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Japan shrugs off S Korean calls for 'sex slave' apology

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"Critics say Seoul uses the issue to galvanise public opinion and focus irritation on Japan, instead of whatever is happening at home."

And the critics where right. Let's learn from that awful past and move on.

4 ( +17 / -13 )

Japan have better things to do other than apologizing to these people. No need to explain to these Koreans of their actions that happened over a half of century. Let go of the past and move on.

-15 ( +10 / -25 )

i like this stance better. This issue has been milked to the core and only the South Korean politicians benefit from it. Nothing happens to the so called victims.

-2 ( +12 / -14 )

Now that the right wing has firmly taken control, we will never get an apology, but even in the past, when things were not that far right leaning, I felt the Japanese always worried that once you apologize, it opens the flood gates to more demands, and the call to make some kind of financial settlement. What I really wonder is, what would South Korea do, if the Abe gov't did issue a formal apology, and a really well written one at that, then what would they do?

-7 ( +4 / -11 )

It was mentioned before: forgive but never forget.

"... and offered financial compensation to victims via a non-government group,"

This is the point, non-government and offered. This compensation should have officially come from the Japanese government, not "just" some NG group. Maybe it would have made "things" easier? But then again, who knows.

8 ( +14 / -6 )

well done Japan, tell korea where to stick their apology

-10 ( +7 / -17 )

Having read through quite a number of articles on this topic I would have to side with the Japanese government on this issue.

During the negotiations for the 1965 Treaty, Japan proposed directly compensating Comfort Women, and all Koreans affected by Japanese actions. This was rejected by South Korean, who stated that they would organize compensation, but then took the money and invested it in State infrastructure, without passing it onto the victims. Both sides were bound by confidentiality clauses in the agreement, which is why Japan could never clearly state how the matter had been settled from their perspective.

Japanese statesmen have repeatedly recognized the pain and suffering that Japan caused before and during WW2 on many nations and offered apologies for the actions that caused them. However, these apologies often fall on deaf ears as the individual Korean victims are still waiting on compensation that their own government has misappropriated.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_on_Basic_Relations_between_Japan_and_the_Republic_of_Korea http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_war_apology_statements_issued_by_Japan

0 ( +14 / -14 )

Each time Korea has a new president, they settle issues concerning Japan's wartime activities.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

And every time some rightist politician stands up in the Gikai and states that some Japanese atrocity is just an illusion conjured up by some lying Chinese or Korean then we see the whole issue flare up again......

4 ( +11 / -7 )

However, these apologies often fall on deaf ears as the individual Korean victims are still waiting on compensation that their own government has misappropriated.

Park should have asked her dad where the money went, considering he was in power at the time. (getting straight to the compensation part as per inspectorgadget's link above)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_on_Basic_Relations_between_Japan_and_the_Republic_of_Korea#Compensation

Dear old dad. Lovely chap. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Park_Chung-hee

Somebody should say it aloud - President Park is scum and her agenda is to stay in power. I'm surprised the daughter of her father would even be considered for election, but then again... South Korea. Their slogan should be "Hey, we're not as crazy as North Korea!". Something to be proud of.

-2 ( +8 / -10 )

It seems that Japan has properly apologized and compensated but South Korea has not to Vietnam having asked apology and compensation.

-1 ( +7 / -8 )

An opportunity for Japan to get it over with. Yet, an arrogant country is also as stubborn like a mule.

-1 ( +7 / -8 )

One of the main problems with this issue is not the treaties of past, not the paid compensations of past, not the repeated apologies of the past......, but rather the denials, the revisions, the obfuscations of the the present.

Every country has, shall we say politely "it's agitators with perhaps extreme views", but these are part and parcel of a democratic social structure.

However in Japan there have been the same views continually espoused by senior politicians and business and social leaders. Lacking totally in what we would call "diplomacy", they have un-done the hard concillatory work of many caring Japanese.

Putting it directly, they just add fuel to the fire - which in turn inflames the "agitated" Korean element - while at the same time emboldening the local "crazies". All in all creating an unhealthy nationalistic fervour reminiscent of days gone by.

Revisionist school texts, Yasukuni visits, derogatory statements, baseless inflammatory speeches etc do not befit a mature compassionate nation.

6 ( +13 / -7 )

It seems that Japan has properly apologized

They haven't.

and compensated

They haven't.

South Korea has not to Vietnam having asked apology and compensation.

Whether they should or shouldn't has nothing to do with whether Japan should or shouldn't properly deal with Korea.

-4 ( +10 / -14 )

Japan has paid Korea reparations for the war, Korea spent all the money on rebuilding roads and towns and gave nothing to the people.

Here lies the problem, should Japan say sorry it opens up a can or worms for them to claim compensation.

Korea can easily just shift the focus to a Japanese problem rather than the Korea government spending all the money.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Japan, on numerous occasions, has apologized sincerely and at length.

Browny1 is correct when he points out that part of the problem lies in "the denials, the revisions,[and] the obfuscations...by senior politicians" But another major part of the problem stems from the refusal to recognize these apologies from the majority of Koreans:

As of 2010, 24% of South Koreans still feel that Japan has never apologized for its colonial rule, while another 58% believe Japan has not apologized sufficiently.[59] Some in the Japanese government have expressed exasperation at what level of apology is enough.

(Inspector Gadget's link was broken. Here it is again.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_war_apology_statements_issued_by_Japan

6 ( +11 / -5 )

Just compare it with the situation of North Korea's kidnapping of 13 Japanese which will continue forever with the Japanese commenting like: Yurusenai! (can never be forgiven!) Well, Japan, your grandfathers including the grandfather of your prime minister, a War Criminal, have committed Yurusenai crimes in Korea, and this will continue. So get used to it!

3 ( +8 / -5 )

Besides the fact that Japan wanted to directly compensate Korean "individuals who suffered" under it's colonial rule back in 1965 but the SKorean goverment iniusted tthat THEY would distribute the funds but DIDN'T spending it on infrastructure and deveoipong Pohang Steel Works, AND that the basis of Soth Korea's Comfort Women position was based on a false story run by the Asahi Newspaper, AND that South Korea continues to play the victim card when 240,000 Korean men who served in the Imperial Japaese miltary made use of the Comfort Stations, many of which were run and managed by Koreans, AND the South Korean goverment has learned to copy China, who sent 250,000 troops to the Korean Penninsula to support North Korea and kill South Koreans, to use anti-Japan sentiment as a political tool. It's a sign of Park's polical desperation that she's back on the CW bandwagon now that her approval ratings are scraping bottom. Japan is right to ignore South Korea,

-3 ( +9 / -12 )

Fortunately with the age of information we live in, all the world can see and will see the documents of crimes committed by Japan in WWII forever. Comfort Women is just one of these. There are many others including the atrocities of Unit 731 cutting open people without anesthesia like in the horror movies. The barbaric acts of Japanese Imperial army will never be forgiven, as long as they are in denial and do not have the courage to accept their crimes and honestly apologize. May God judge you for raping all these women, a figure in hundred thousand or more ...

1 ( +8 / -7 )

I look at the facts, I hear both opinions, and no, I'm not ashamed to be Japanese. Unfortunately, Ms. Park seems to dislike Japan quite a bit. She has only done things to worsen diplomatic relations between the two countries over the past 2 years. I would be ashamed if I were Ms. Park for taking such irrisponsible actions. But at the same time Japanese and Koreans think differently, so I am in no position to judge anyone.

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

This may surprise some people, but I bet a lot of Koreans are secretly happy to see Japan display this callous, uncaring attitude.

They know well enough that Japan has already lost a great deal of international standing and faces some very serious criticisms from people of conscience in other advanced nations as the country that continues to deny its past evil. I'm sure Koreans are happy to see Japan voluntarily continue to be known as the nation with no historical conscience.

-1 ( +9 / -10 )

If you have any doubts about Comfort Women, or are not educated on the issue, just do a Kensaku (search) in Youtube. Watch for example, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5yHHfYOGumI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mard9WrYn2I Words cannot describe the gravity of these crimes, and its denial is simply ridiculous. Can they ever "Grow Up"?

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

strangerland

It seems too hard to understand why Japanese government has to pay more apologies and compensations to those who will ignore sincere apology and sincere compensation at all for Vietnam for many years, though Japan has already done historically.

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

“We have explained our position many times. We want to continue our diplomatic efforts so that our view will be understood,” says Abe's Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga. This is denial in so many words. As long as Japan continues in this vain this issue will remain a sore point in South Korean-Japanese relations.

3 ( +11 / -8 )

slowguy2: "This may surprise some people, but I bet a lot of Koreans are secretly happy to see Japan display this callous, uncaring attitude. They know well enough that Japan has already lost a great deal of international standing and faces some very serious criticisms from people of conscience in other advanced nations as the country that continues to deny its past evil. I'm sure Koreans are happy to see Japan voluntarily continue to be known as the nation with no historical conscience."

Don't forget Chinese and others who see Japan as is. Many are sickened by their ignorance. And at the same time, many are relieved that they are revealing their true identity to the rest of the world.

-5 ( +5 / -10 )

AND that the basis of Soth Korea's Comfort Women position was based on a false story run by the Asahi Newspaper,

Ossan -- you lose all credibility right there. But let's see what the NY Times says:

Two weeks later, Japan’s ambassador for human rights, Kuni Sato, was sent to New York to ask a former United Nations special rapporteur on violence against women, Radhika Coomaraswamy, to reconsider her 1996 report on the comfort women — an authoritative account of how, during World War II, imperial Japan forced women and girls into sexual slavery. Ms. Coomaraswamy refused, observing that one retraction did not overturn her findings, which were based on ample documents and myriad testimonies of victims throughout Japanese-occupied territories.

Or how about this from Wikipedia:

In 1944, the United States Office of War Information report of interviews with 20 Korean comfort women in Burma found that the girls were induced by the offer of plenty of money, an opportunity to pay off family debts, easy work, and the prospect of a new life in a new land, Singapore. On the basis of these false representations many girls enlisted for overseas duty and were rewarded with an advance of a few hundred yen. Only some of these girls who had paid their debt were allowed to return to Korea.

I just cannot understand why your obvious hatred for anything related to Korea blinds you to reality. Should SK probably back off this issue, as it clearly is not helping relations with Japan any? Almost certainly. But simply mis-stating the facts, and trying to make Japan look like the "victim" simply because of one poor decision by the Asahi Shimbun is just foolish -- even more so.

3 ( +14 / -11 )

"Japan has issued formal apologies over their suffering and offered financial compensation to victims via a non-government group, but Seoul maintains it is not contrite enough."

Then too bad.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

I wonder how long it is going to take to truly normalize the relation between the two.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

How ironic of Japan to ignore something they are largely, not entirely, instigating. If only Japan would stop bringing up the issue of their wartime atrocities (text-book changes, apology alterations Yasakuni visits etc.) then Korea and China might be less aggravated.

-1 ( +10 / -11 )

A Formal apology and mere back door compensation are not the same. Many times corporations compensate (settle out of court) rather than admit guilt in open court. Sounds like the same situation here. Japan should own up to the things it did in the past. No shame on succeeding generations.

4 ( +10 / -6 )

Japanese nationalists have expanded campaigns to assert that the brothels were run by pimps and shadowy operators in the private sector, and that the Japanese military neither tricked nor enslaved the women.<

I am in total agreement with this. Wars bring out even more evil than people can bear. Prostitution is one of them, and it greatly increases during war so people can feed family and friends.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Ms. Park's supporters on JT are displaying signs of being just as misinformed and/or unwilling to accept the facts as she is.

The amount of time you devote to spewing such rubbish could be better spent in doing something positive. But here's a thought that might appeal -

Taiwan was a colony before Korea. Yes, there is some call for compensation but it's nowhere near as frequent as the demands from across the Sea of Japan. Funnily enough, Taiwanese and Japanese get on fine. This probably really irritates you, assuming you've enough sense to be aware of it.

As an alternative to finding a life, why not harass online Taiwanese news sites about their (replicated by most countries) ability to move on and focus on now and the future? Somehow we normal people will manage without your presence.

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

@ReformedBasher The issue is not about bashing Japan but correcting its tarnished image by a group of rightist politicians whose vans broadcast hate speech openly in public. I am not Japanese neither Korean but my respect for Japan where I live helps me understand that Denials are destructive to the image of Japan. I wish Japan could get the respect of the international community the way Germany did, not through denial. Also remember most of the victims were from Korea and Japan left quite a different legacy in the two countries you are comparing.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

What I really wonder is, what would South Korea do, if the Abe gov't did issue a formal apology, and a really well written one at that, then what would they do?

Apologies are meaningless unless people like Abe, Hashimoto, Ishihara etc are prevented from making denials in the name of "freedom of expression" after the fact. Do you see politicians in Germany or Austria denying the Holocaust? No. Germany has apologised to, and compensated, its victims, as well as passing laws against denial. Thus WW2 ghosts have long since been laid to rest. Not so in Japan, unfortunately. And this is why South Korea is justified in protesting

1 ( +8 / -7 )

Taiwan was a colony before Korea.

Yes, but it fears being recovered by China, so Taiwan is very quiet on historical issues as it needs the full support of Japan.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

There is one more apology the Japanese authorities could offer Koreans to salve the festering wounds caused by the official policy of denial, and that is to memorialize the Korean slave laborers who toiled and died during the construction of the top-secret underground Imperial General Headquarters in Matsuhiro, Nagano, which was designed to serve as "Hirohito's Last Stand" after the US invasion of the mainland, rather like the fanciful scenario of a "Goetterdaemmerung" conjured up by desperate Nazi die-hards.The last forty-six Korean workers who were still on the site up to August 15th, the day the war ended, were "disappeared" overnight. All documents pertaining to the forced labor and secret construction were supposedly burnt by the usual suspects. End of the story as far as the Japanese government was concerned, but of course the shame still smoulders in the embers of the historical record.

8 ( +11 / -3 )

Germany's response to its war crimes has been largely lauded by the former Allies. The Government of the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany until 1990) offered official apologies for Germany's role in the Holocaust. Additionally, German leaders have continuously expressed repentance, most notably when former Chancellor Willy Brandt fell on his knees in front of a Holocaust memorial in the Warsaw Ghetto, also known as the Warschauer Kniefall in 1970. Germany has also paid extensive reparations, including nearly $70 billion to the state of Israel. It has given $15 billion to Holocaust survivors and will continue to compensate them until this year. Additionally, the government of Germany coordinated an effort to reach a settlement with German companies that had used slave labor during the war; the companies will pay $1.7 billion to victims. Germany also established a National Holocaust Memorial Museum in Berlin for looted property.

Germany has apologized on every anniversary of the war.

Japan says we apologized already, that's enough. Germany has been about atoning for their sins and moving forward since the war. Japan has always been about going back to the way things were before they lost the war.

4 ( +11 / -7 )

Taiwan was a colony before Korea. Yes, there is some call for compensation but it's nowhere near as frequent as the demands from across the Sea of Japan.

If the Taiwanese are willing to accept the situation as resolved, good on them. That's their choice and their right. They have their own relationship with Japan, and how they want to proceed with their relationship is between Taiwan and Japan. Who it's not between is Korea and anyone else. And on that note, the Koreans have their own relationship with Japan, and how they want to proceed with that relationship is between Korea and Japan, and no one else. So the fact that the Taiwanese have for the most part dropped their concerns regarding the sex slaves is entirely irrelevant to whether the Koreans should.

8 ( +11 / -3 )

At this point, any apology or compensation won't help the victims. I would like to note that many of the victims are already dead, those who aren't will soon follow. The victims have lived their lives and won't benefit from any compensation anymore. It's simply too late to look into the past now and fan the flames of hatred.

You also shouldn't forget that Park's and Abe's behavior are both dragging generations into this situation who have nothing to do with all of this. In the end, this will give birth to extremism and discrimination in both countries and, thus, ultimately continue a war which should have long been over.

Both sides are fundamentally wrong. They should both put their differences aside to discuss not the past, but the future of the current generation. Unless both of them don't see the error of their ways, there won't be a solution. Simple as that.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

At this point, any apology or compensation won't help the victims.

Absolutely ridiculous. If anything, it will help them more now at the end of their life than it would earlier. They can rest in peace knowing that the situation has been resolved.

I would like to note that many of the victims are already dead, those who aren't will soon follow.

By that logic, no one ever needs to be apologized to, or compensated, as they'll be dead soon enough anyways.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Yes, but it fears being recovered by China, so Taiwan is very quiet on historical issues as it needs the full support of Japan.

For what? Japan trades with both Taiwan and South Korea, but only has a defense pact with the latter (with the US included of course). In that light, South Korea should get along with Japan even better than Taiwan does.

hokkaidoguy,

How very true and sensible. Well said.

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

Absolutely ridiculous. If anything, it will help them more now at the end of their life than it would earlier. They can rest in peace knowing that the situation has been resolved.

Korea was given money (108 billion yen) by Japan in the past, too. But back then, nobody cared about these victims and not a cent was used on them. This was Korea's mistake, not Japan's.

After that, the Japanese government even set up the Asian Women's Fund (1994-2007) which also included Korea as benefactor. I think that the victims can rest in peace, since it was clearly set up as an act of remorse for their actions. Don't you think that gesture made them happy? I'm sure the victims were happy. I would be, too. I would also like to remind you that it was the Korean government who also demonized this act of charity offered by the Japanese people.

By that logic, no one ever needs to be apologized to, or compensated, as they'll be dead soon enough anyways.

You've sorely missed my point. I have said that it's too late NOW. If this happened 10, 20 years earlier, it would have made much more sense. But, oh wait, there was the Asian Women's Fund in that time frame. The PM also offered an apology in that time frame. Too bad that such facts are never acknowledged and immediately invalidated.

The only reason that Korea would want to bring this up NOW, when it's too late, is, as the critic said:

to galvanise public opinion and focus irritation on Japan, instead of whatever is happening at home.

A P.R. stunt, a distraction, nothing more. I also find it a little harsh that a country, which still celebrated war crimes against another country last year, has the gut to demand an apology about war crimes from another country. Just to draw some moral parallels there.

Moreover, all of you still forget that in the treaty of 1965, Japan and Korea agreed that they finalized all the problems in World War 2 forever and perfectly.

This case is, de facto, over.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Korea was given money (108 billion yen) by Japan in the past, too. But back then, nobody cared about these victims and not a cent was used on them. This was Korea's mistake, not Japan's.

So now you are switching from "any apology or compensation won't help the victims" to "compensation has already been paid". Shifting the goalposts.

After that, the Japanese government even set up the Asian Women's Fund (1994-2007)

And expected the populace to pay into it. That doesn't really show much remorse on the part of the government.

You've sorely missed my point. I have said that it's too late NOW. If this happened 10, 20 years earlier, it would have made much more sense.

I didn't miss your point at all. Again, by your logic no one should ever be apologized to or compensated, as they will be dead soon enough. Human lives are very short on the greater scale of things.

I also find it a little harsh that a country, which still celebrated war crimes against another country last year, has the gut to demand an apology about war crimes from another country.

Even if Korea perpetuated war crimes last year (I'm not taking a stance on that in either direction), it doesn't justify the Japanese atrocities committed, nor does it negate the necessity for an apology by the Japanese. It's a separate issue altogether with no bearing on the current issue.

Japan and Korea agreed that they finalized all the problems in World War 2 forever and perfectly.

If that were true, we wouldn't be having this discussion today. It very obviously was not settled perfectly.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

I think its disgusting that Japan is still burying there heads in the sand on this issue, why don’t the government stand up, get a back bone and just say “sorry, we should not have done this “once and for all.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

They know well enough that Japan has already lost a great deal of international standing and faces some very serious criticisms from people of conscience in other advanced nations as the country that continues to deny its past evil.

Really? Not in any news I've read or seen lately.

The facts are that Japan has paid compensation and apologised. It's done, finito. If the SK government spent the cash on other things that's hardly Japan's fault is it?

0 ( +5 / -5 )

So now you are switching from "any apology or compensation won't help the victims" to "compensation has already been paid". Shifting the goalposts.

I didn't miss your point at all. Again, by your logic no one should ever be apologized to or compensated, as they will be dead soon enough. Human lives are very short on the greater scale of things.

You still haven't gotten my point. It won't help them NOW as much as it would have helped them BACK THEN. Considering the past and present circumstances, it's simply too late.

Do you really mean to defend that they didn't use even a fraction of all that money for the comfort women? They could have been paid right then and there but they weren't. And why? Because the Korean government simply didn't give them that money. We are talking about 108 billion yen here. Even 5% (5.4 bil yen), even 2.5% (2.7 bil yen) of that is more than the whole Asian Women's Fund raised included with tax payments. (which is 1.7 bil yen) And it was just not given to them. That's why, I say it again, it's too late to demand that Japan pays again. You can't tell me it was impossible.

They've had their fair chances to distribute it, but they didn't. What good does it do them when they're almost dead and could have had it when they were a lot younger? This whole problem could have been avoided right then. Stop acting like Korea did everything right and accept that Korea had its chances to distribute the money it got from Japan in 65 to meet these womens' needs.

It's an atrocity in itself, to be honest. But Japan is far more horrible, right? Even after the Japanese initiated fund, you mean to tell me it's still not enough today? When the Japanese start to care more about the comfort women than these womens' own government, you should notice that something's really wrong...

And expected the populace to pay into it. That doesn't really show much remorse on the part of the government.

The populace would have paid into it regardless. Tax money is collected from the populace as well. But don't worry, the government paid with tax money. "770m yen ($6.5m) in taxpayers' money was provided to pay for medical fees for these women"

it doesn't justify the Japanese atrocities committed, nor does it negate the necessity for an apology by the Japanese

We can turn the tables and say that the Japanese atrocities don't justify how irresponsible the Korean government handled that influx of money and just neglected the comfort women altogether. Parker and Abe should totally apologize together in the name of their respective governments. Don't you think?

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Here's an idea - how about if Abe reiterates the Kono Statement which acknowledged Japan's guilt and apologized for what they did to these women, and admit he was wrong about the women being professonal prostitutes? This would go a long way toward improving relations with Korea. No good?

1 ( +4 / -3 )

StrangerlandMar. 03, 2015 - 05:27PM JST

They have a right to be angry with both the Japanese and Korean governments - the Koreans for not sharing the money they received,

Good point. Korean former comfort women should sue Korean government for compensation and apology for embezzlement. The money is there. When it pays the money, everything will be settled.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

You still haven't gotten my point. It won't help them NOW as much as it would have helped them BACK THEN. Considering the past and present circumstances, it's simply too late.

No, you said it won't help period. You didn't make any comparisons timewise.

Good point. Korean former comfort women should sue Korean government for compensation and apology for embezzlement. The money is there. When it pays the money, everything will be settled.

Well that is one way to settle it. The other is for the Japanese government to pay the compensation. What doesn't help anyone is for the Japanese government to say the Korean government should pay it, and for the Korean government to say the Japanese government should pay it.

In fact, if the Japanese really wanted to clear up the situation, they would pay the sex slaves, then sue the Korean government for not properly paying the money to the sex slaves as they were supposed to.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

The Korean government had to use the money for the victims when Japan paid, but they used for other things. This is the only fact that matters. Indeed, all the following denials from Japan are also because of the fact SK wants money again.

Some people here are praising Germany without knowing the facts. Germany apologized but it isn't paying money everytime any of its former victims ask them. This is misinformation. Some people apparenlty know NOTHING about the current situation in Europe. The Greeks actually were never properly compensated by Germany and now they are asking for compensation, but Germany rejected. Period. Plus, it's not true that now in Europe all the countries are living together happily (?!). South Europe thinks Germany politics is destroying Europe again, and the Germans forgot how the whole Europe forgave them and helped economically Germany for her reunification. You can side with Germany position or with South Europe position, but at least don't be in denial and face the fact that in many European countries the extreme right is increasing because of German-austerity politics. According to many people, Germany attitude shows they didn't learn from history, since they are creating the basis for fascism in Europe again. The Greeks hate Germany. Also in Italy, many people don't want to stay in the EU anymore and they are embracing parties like CasaPound (ultra-right, fascist), Lega Nord and other other anti-EU parties, while Germany doesn't care, because she cares more about her business with China, and forgot how the rest of Europe helped it after the reunification.

Do you think everyday European countries are asking for war reparation money to Germany, like SK does? Except for the Greeks, not. But many people think Germany is ruining the EU. So, get the facts straight and don't embellish European tragic situation, where all are "friends".

Finally, you should notice how while both China and SK are asking for Japan facing his history properly (and this is right, but every country should do it, and you can't deny also China and SK history version is biased and censored), only SK wants more money. I think this is insulting for the victims, I doubt they are the ones who are asking for money, like if money could delete their terrible memories of war time. And if they need money, they should ask them to their own government that used that money given from Japan for building streets, and other things.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

North Korea are launching short range missiles whilst vowing to carry out “merciless strikes” against the U.S. and South Korea, for the sake of political expediency and common security interests, a diplomatic solution is long overdue.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

About Germany/Greece (and not only) relation:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/greece/11400718/Germany-rejects-Greek-war-reparations-call.html

These are news on a daily basis. The loan matter is the most interesting one, since it's not even about war reparations, and Germany should consider that at least, since it is imposing her rules over the Greeks and the others...But this is thei attitude:

But the response from Germany was blunt. “The likelihood is zero,” Sigmar Gabriel, Angela Merkel’s vice-chancellor, told a party meeting in the state of Brandenburg.

I hope some people actually learn to read news about Europe (where I live) before starting their usual fairy tail about how Japan should learn from the perfect Germany at dealing with its former colonies, in Europe all the countries are friends, etc.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Ok, let me make this very easy for you: if you go to the bank and get a loan and a couple of days or weeks later you tell them you will not pay it back, what will happen?

Right. But I was speaking about this loan:

The demand for reparations centres on two issues: a war loan of 476 million Reichsmarks that the Bank of Greece was forced to make to the Nazis – essentially the Greeks were made to pay the costs of their own occupation – and compensation for the destruction and suffering caused by the occupation. The loan, which was never directly repaid, would amount to some €11bn (£8bn) today before interest. A Greek commission of inquiry last year determined that Germany owes Greece a total of around €160bn (£120bn) before interest, to cover the loan and the cost of damage from the occupation.

I guess you are okay only when people bring the Germany topic here to say "how good and perfect is Germany, Japan should learn from Germany, everyone loves Germany".

This is why I started the topic, since there's always this comparison between Japan and Germany. You said Park and Abe should work together, but Germany rejects to work together with the Greece about the loan and war reparations matters, so I wonder why Germany shoudl be considered like a model from Japan, only why they say "sorry"? And about learning from history...Learning from hystory means also don't let to create the same scenario that brought to the war.

(not only the UK news)

Are you saying the UK news are biased against Germany? I chose UK news since they are written in English, of course.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

From the official website of MOFA:

Letter from Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi to the former comfort women

The Year of 2001

Dear Madam,

On the occasion that the Asian Women's Fund, in cooperation with the Government and the people of Japan, offers atonement from the Japanese people to the former wartime comfort women, I wish to express my feelings as well.

The issue of comfort women, with an involvement of the Japanese military authorities at that time, was a grave affront to the honor and dignity of large numbers of women.

As Prime Minister of Japan, I thus extend anew my most sincere apologies and remorse to all the women who underwent immeasurable and painful experiences and suffered incurable physical and psychological wounds as comfort women.

We must not evade the weight of the past, nor should we evade our responsibilities for the future.

I believe that our country, painfully aware of its moral responsibilities, with feelings of apology and remorse, should face up squarely to its past history and accurately convey it to future generations.

Furthermore, Japan also should take an active part in dealing with violence and other forms of injustice to the honor and dignity of women.

Finally, I pray from the bottom of my heart that each of you will find peace for the rest of your lives.

Respectfully yours,

Junichiro Koizumi Prime Minister of Japan

Statement by the Chief Cabinet Secretary Yohei Kono on the result of the study on the issue of "comfort women"

August 4, 1993

The Government of Japan has been conducting a study on the issue of wartime "comfort women" since December 1991. I wish to announce the findings as a result of that study.

As a result of the study which indicates that comfort stations were operated in extensive areas for long periods, it is apparent that there existed a great number of comfort women. Comfort stations were operated in response to the request of the military authorities of the day. The then Japanese military was, directly or indirectly, involved in the establishment and management of the comfort stations and the transfer of comfort women. The recruitment of the comfort women was conducted mainly by private recruiters who acted in response to the request of the military. The Government study has revealed that in many cases they were recruited against their own will, through coaxing, coercion, etc., and that, at times, administrative/military personnel directly took part in the recruitments. They lived in misery at comfort stations under a coercive atmosphere.

As to the origin of those comfort women who were transferred to the war areas, excluding those from Japan, those from the Korean Peninsula accounted for a large part. The Korean Peninsula was under Japanese rule in those days, and their recruitment, transfer, control, etc., were conducted generally against their will, through coaxing, coercion, etc.

Undeniably, this was an act, with the involvement of the military authorities of the day, that severely injured the honor and dignity of many women. The Government of Japan would like to take this opportunity once again to extend its sincere apologies and remorse to all those, irrespective of place of origin, who suffered immeasurable pain and incurable physical and psychological wounds as comfort women.

It is incumbent upon us, the Government of Japan, to continue to consider seriously, while listening to the views of learned circles, how best we can express this sentiment.

We shall face squarely the historical facts as described above instead of evading them, and take them to heart as lessons of history. We hereby reiterate our firm determination never to repeat the same mistake by forever engraving such issues in our memories through the study and teaching of history.

As actions have been brought to court in Japan and interests have been shown in this issue outside Japan, the Government of Japan shall continue to pay full attention to this matter, including private researched related thereto.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

klausdorthMar. 03, 2015 - 06:41PM JST

Mr. Abe and his colleagues should get their act straight, same South Korea's Park, talk and work together to solve this problem mutually.

The "problem" was all solved in 1965 when Korea Japan Basic Treaty was concluded and was ratified by Korean Congress and Japanese Parliament. There is no problem left to be solved.

By the way, the treaty was concluded when Pak Jeong Hui, the father of President Pak, was Korean president and Eisaku Sato, the granduncle of PM Abe was Japanese Prime Minister. They might as well talk about the significance and feel proud of the achievement of their ancestors.

Or, should we forget about the mutually ratified treaty and start solving the problem that was solved 50 years ago? In that case, Korea will soon forget about the new solution again. I hope we have better memory than that.

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

The vast majority of anyone who was involved is dead. Lets move on.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

"The vast majority of anyone who was involved is dead. Lets move on."

Following that logic, the Japanese soldiers should have just killed all the sex slaves, and then the Allies should have just killed all the Japanese soldiers, then anyone who was involved in that sordid episode would have been dead and Japan and Korea could have moved on after 1945.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

The vast majority of anyone who was involved is dead. Lets move on.

The vast majority of victims of The Holocost are dead as well, obviously. Does that mean the world should just forget it and "move on"? What an ignorent comment, that, unfortunately reflects the attitude of many Japanese people -- years have passed, and since most of the victims have died, Japan can "move on" without any real sense of guilt. Afterall, time heals all wounds right? And so Japan has the right to insist that enough time has passed for the victims to get over it all. And who says Japan is cold and arrogant?

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

"Moreover, all of you still forget that in the treaty of 1965, Japan and Korea agreed that they finalized all the problems in World War 2 forever and perfectly. This case is, de facto, over."

Not until Abe admits Japan's war crimes and that the sex slaves were not willing prostitutes.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

I watch the back and forth between Japan and Korea as well as the back and forth here and I am of the view that only the passage of time will allow this issue to either be resolved or fade into the blur of history. Not a satisfactory way to resolve it, but I can't see this being resolved any other way.

Accusations flung back and forth, both sides posturing to placate their domestic audience and to preserve the honour of country and family.

So, a few facts:

Comfort women did exist. Both sides agree on this. Fact. The only question is whether there was coercion involved in obtaining their services. Without question, this is the biggest point of contention. In dispute, but coercion for some Korean women (setting aside the broader comfort women system and women of other nationalities) does appear to be supported. Japan and Korea signed the Treaty and compensation/monies were paid to settle all claims, regardless of whether claims regarding comfort women were specifically covered. This is the language of the treaty and supporting documents. Fact. Korea may dispute whether this was, in fact, covered, but the idea of full and final settlement is clear. Fact. Japan has made multiple apologies regarding the comfort women issue over the years. There is no disputing this. Fact. At the same time, Abe himself as well as many conservative politicians have, since these apologies were made, have disputed whether coercion actually took place, effectively undermining previous apologies. Fact. The subject of comfort women as a specific issue did not arise until nearly 40 years after the war. It most certainly was not front and center for the Koreans as an issue. Fact. Abe and the Japanese government has sought to get U.S. textbooks, for example, revised to reflect the view that coercion of comfort women did not happen. Fact. Japan has embarked on a revision to the education program to instill patriotic education and love of country, a long sought goal of the conservatives, which includes a sanitisation of colonial and wartime history. Fact. Korea's education of its own children as it relates to 20th century is certainly not above reproach and most certainly does not delve into the complexities of the post war era, to include the nation's own handling of the comfort women issue. Fact. Abe's grandfather was a prime minister but also deeply involved in WW2, both in Manchuria and as a member of Tojo's cabinet and he was imprisoned as a Class A war criminal suspect. Abe himself has said that he feels revulsion that people would suspect his grandfather as being a war criminal and that he may feel attachment to conservatism as a result. Fact. Abe's great uncle, Eisaku Sato, was PM when the Treaty with Korea was signed. Fact. Park's father was the military dictator for a good portion of Korea's post war history, most importantly when the Treaty with Japan was signed. The handling of the negotiations and the agreement regarding compensation occurred on his watch. So whatever was and was not agreed to with Japan, to include any provision for (or omission of) compensation for comfort women occurred with his knowledge. Fact.

Does anyone disagree with any of the above? Happy to hear contrary views, just my view of the facts.

Unfortunately, there is no clear way out that will satisfy both sides, certainly not under the current governments on both sides.

Both Abe and Park representative the conservative/nationalist elements of their respective countries. As such, they will never sacrifice country & family honour to achieve a solution. Never.

Equally, the populations of both countries, as a general matter, either are ignorant of the specifics or are sympathetic to the positions put forward by the conservatives in their country. Not all, but the majority. Only my observation having followed this issue, so feel free to challenge me on this if you like.

So, we are where we are. Abe, his government the conservative politicians will pursue their agenda to restore Japanese honour and remove the masochistic view of history that they feel permeates school textbooks. They most certainly will not cede any more ground with respect to the war and will likely seek to reclaim ground that they feel was wrongly ceded, such as seeking revisions to U.S. textbooks, as an example.

Park and the conservatives in Korea will continue to push a nationalist agenda and will use Japan as a unifying force in the face of domestic issues. They will most certainly not cede any ground on this issue and, rest assured that if Japan does nothing further and all comfort women pass away with no further action, the “injustices” of Japan in this regard will be cast in stone for future children to study.

Pretty bleak outlook if you ask me. But that’s just my take on it.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Sorry for the typo. It should, of course, be "Holocaust".

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Japan and Korea signed the Treaty and compensation/monies were paid to settle all claims, regardless of whether claims regarding comfort women were specifically covered. This is the language of the treaty and supporting documents. Fact. Korea may dispute whether this was, in fact, covered, but the idea of full and final settlement is clear. Fact. Japan has made multiple apologies

Nope, as this link shows. Japan has outstanding debts. http://japanfocus.org/-Totsuka-Etsuro/3885

As for the apologies: meaningless as long as Abe, Hashimoto, Ishihara etc have the freedom to contradict them

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

@Christopher Glen:

Thanks much for the comments. On the recent developments covered in the link, I understand the point you are trying to make. However, Japan does not have outstanding debts. There are potential claims that some may want to pursue, but until such time as there is agreement that Japan owes such monies, there is no outstanding debt. No party can unilaterally claim outstanding debts on an agreement that settled all outstanding debts, unless specific carveouts exist for the pursuit of such claims and/or the claims are pursued outside of the scope of the agreement. Maybe I am missing the point and/or there is something that you are focused on in the link that I am not addressing. Happy to discuss further, as this is a worthwhile conversation.

Regarding your point on the apologies, that was my point as well with respect to Abe's subsequent comments. I am merely pointing out that the original apologies are a fact. Had they not been modified by subsequent comments/contradictions, they might carry more weight. Which, if Korea was trying to make this point, they should be explicit about it. Conversely, the Japanese government is not responsible for the comments of every politician. In the end, it is what is stated officially by the government in power, whether that be the PM, the Cabinet, etc. For lack of a better term, the official position of the government.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

1.Comfort women did exist. Both sides agree on this. Fact. The only question is whether there was coercion involved in obtaining their services. Without question, this is the biggest point of contention

To be exact, the biggest point of contention is who was involved in the coercion. In regards to the Korean comfort women, there exists no evidence that they were coerced by the Japanese military and that if there was any coercion, the individuals were that of the private operators or recruiters.

So the comparison to that of the Holocaust is lame for this is a well documented from top to the bottom, state issued order to force the Jews, gypsies, and homosexuals executed throughout parts of Europe.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

@nigelboy:

Fair enough. The question is two-fold, with an overlay that complicates matters: was there coercion, and if there was, who did the coercing. There seems to be more willingness to accept, on both sides, that there was coercion in some cases. The question, then of who did the coercing, becomes the key point.

You have indicated that if any coercing happened, there is no evidence that this was done by the Japanese military directly. I won't get into all of the details here, but this point is not so clearcut. And, indeed, the Kono statement seems to imply that this did take place, so if the Japanese government does not believe this to be the case, then the Kono statement would need to be amended.

Finally, the overlay is this. Regardless of who did the coercing, if coercing happened, did the Japanese military knowingly condone and facilitate it where the coercing was not done directly by the military?Again, there is evidence to suggest that it would be impossible for them not to condone it.

However, as I was stipulating in my original post, this is the point of contention as it relates to the comfort women.

Anyway, appreciate the feedback/thoughts back.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

You have indicated that if any coercing happened, there is no evidence that this was done by the Japanese military directly. I won't get into all of the details here, but this point is not so clearcut. And, indeed, the Kono statement seems to imply that this did take place, so if the Japanese government does not believe this to be the case, then the Kono statement would need to be amended.

As Prof. Nishioka indicated on his paper, the portion of "and that, at times, administrative/military personnel directly took part in the recruitment.." was based on one case, the Semarang case.

And as the Kono Statement review report which came out last year indicates, the Korean government would not accept statements that did not indicate "coersiveness" element.

"...the ROK side stated that on the question of how the Japanese side makes its recognition, it believed that while it would not be possible to make an announcement that contradicted the facts for Japan, it should avoid employing a complicated “preface” (such as stating, for example, that “it was not possible to find documents showing the direct involvement of the military in the recruitment” before recognizing the involvement of “coerciveness” in some form)..."

This is one of many problems with the Kono statement itself for the entire passage gives an impression that Japanese military did take part in the coersive recruitment as a policy and when you attach the over inflated 200,000 number, you get a exaggerated narrative of

"...more than 200,000 women and girls who were abducted by the armedforces of government of Imperial Japan..." or the McGraw Hill's

".. The Japanese army forcibly recruited, conscripted, and dragooned as many as two hundred thousand women age fourteen to twenty to serve in military brothels, called "comfort houses" or "consolation centers".

Finally, the overlay is this. Regardless of who did the coercing, if coercing happened, did the Japanese military knowingly condone and facilitate it where the coercing was not done directly by the military?Again, there is evidence to suggest that it would be impossible for them not to condone it.

Again, the recruiment was done by private operators and brokers. As in the case of Korean comfort women, they were recruited by these individuals in Korea where they were subject to domestic laws and the enforcement of such laws were conducted mostly by Korean law enforcement agencies and personnel. On that note, there are instances where there were Korean authorities apprehended those who tried to recruit these women in an unlawful manner.

http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%97%A5%E6%9C%AC%E3%81%AE%E6%85%B0%E5%AE%89%E5%A9%A6#mediaviewer/File:%EF%BC%91%EF%BC%99%EF%BC%93%EF%BC%99%E5%B9%B4%EF%BC%98%E6%9C%8831%E6%97%A5%E3%80%8C%E6%9D%B1%E4%BA%9C%E6%97%A5%E5%A0%B1%E3%80%8D.jpg

Using common sense, the Japanese military's presence was minimal in the Korean peninsula at that time. In addition, Kempeitai system (Military police) was abolished in Korea in the 1920's. From a logistical standpoint, you can't forcefully recruit them when you are not there.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

nigelboy Mar. 04, 2015 - 02:41AM JST This is one of many problems with the Kono statement itself for the entire passage gives an impression that Japanese military did take part in the coersive recruitment as a policy

It's not impression. Nobody forced Kono, who represented Japan goverment to admit the problem, but they did. This is called confession. In 1993, the Kono Statement which apologized for the immeasurable pain caused to the comfort women and also affirmed that many of them were employed through coaxing, coercion, with the administrative/military personnel directly involved in their recruitment. Sure, the statement did not go down well with Japanese nationalists who challenged the claim that these women were ‘physically coerced’ by Japanese officials. But this is the history that you cannot change.

Abe announced that Kono Statement will continue as is. However, Abe’s goverment went ahead and announced a review of the drafting process of the Kono Statement, and released a report stating that the content in the statement was drafted jointly by both nations, perhaps hinting at a probable ‘Korean influence’ on the statement. Another denial. Abe's goal for a long time has been to re-educate the Japanese and international public into believing a sanitized version of the ‘comfort women’ history. In the minds of Abe's history, there was no forced recruitment of women by the Japanese military, and Japan's behavior was no different from that of other countries in wartime. The current Japanese government has a generally denialist approach. Abe's government has been working very hard to undermine Kono's credibility. Dismissing the matter by merely calling them professional prostitutes, is actually dishonoring a set of people who felt violated with the treatment history.

If some people think that 1965 treaty was finalized, meaning a done deal, and no further negotiations, why would a former PM Koizumi send written letters of apology to some of the former comfort women many decades later, along with contributions made on the basis of the Kono statement? Many have rejected this letter and payment.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Nobody forced Kono, who represented Japan goverment to admit the problem, but they did.

No. But he was definitely pressured to do so by the Korean counterparts as indicated in the review report. As history shows, it was stupid for Kono to trust the Korean government during the drafting of this statement.

As to the rest of your paragraph, you basically plagiarized the article below so no need to respond in full length.

http://rt.com/op-edge/202503-comfort-women-south-korea-japan/

What ever happened to your comment on March 3 which you state

".. It's because there was no abducted prostitute. Nobody said at the time in Korea, those prostitutes were abducted. Everyone knew there were many women who were so poor that they sold themselves to live and the Japan army didn't have to abduct Korean women..."

It's like I'm arguing with a person with a severe bipolar disorder.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Nigelboy,

Kono, being the head of the Japanese goverment had top secret clearance with access to many of the classified goverment/military information that is not available to media or people like you. He made the decision to apologize based on facts.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Kono, being the head of the Japanese goverment had top secret clearance with access to many of the classified goverment/military information that is not available to media or people like you. He made the decision to apologize based on facts.

Again, as per Nishioka's paper indicates, the portion of "and that, at times, administrative/military personnel directly took part in the recruitment.." was based on one case, the Semarang case. This is based on a statement by Yoshinobu Higashi who was a Counsellor of Cabinet Secretariat at that time.

"...東良信・内閣外政審議室審議官の証言である。東氏は河野談話の中で「慰安婦の募集」について書いている部分につき、慰安婦への「甘言、強圧」に関し、「官憲等が直接これに加担したこともあったことが明らかになった」としている部分に対し、それはインドネシアであった一部隊の戦争犯罪行為について述べたもので(これは一ヶ月後に参謀本部から処罰されていると同時に、戦犯法廷で責任者は死刑になった事件)、それ以外に日本軍が組織的にそのようなことをした事実はないし、またとりわけ朝鮮半島でそのようなことをした事実もない、と証言しているのである.."

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Nigelboy,

Who cares what Professor Nishioka saids. He doesn't represent the goverment, nor does he have secret clearance, or intelligence access.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Who cares what Professor Nishioka saids. He doesn't represent the goverment, nor does he have secret clearance, or intelligence access.

That's why it's backed by Yoshinobu Higashi who was a member of the Cabinet Secretariat (who's also a Counsellor of External Affairs 内閣官房内閣外政審議室内閣審議官併任内閣総理大臣官房参事官) at that time.

In addition, the last year's report indicate

"....Meanwhile on the Japanese side, even after the announcement by Chief Cabinet Secretary Kato, the relevant ministries and agencies continuously investigated related documents and additionally conducted search and investigation of documents in the United States National Archives and Records Administration and in other locations. With these documents that were obtained in this way as a basis, it also began to analyze hearings of military-related parties and those responsible for managing the comfort stations, as well as testimonies collected by the Korean Council, and was able to practically finish compiling the report on the study results. The recognition obtained through these series of studies was that it was not possible to confirm that women were “forcefully recruited.”.."

0 ( +5 / -5 )

nigelboy Mar. 04, 2015 - 08:09AM JST That's why it's backed by Yoshinobu Higashi who was a member of the Cabinet Secretariat (who's also a Counsellor of External Affairs

Kono has aleady affirmed that many of them were employed through coaxing, coercion, with the administrative/military personnel directly involved in their recruitment. Are you saying Nishioka (a civilian teacher) and opponent Higashi with the different point of view is the one you trust the most?

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Kono has aleady affirmed that many of them were employed through coaxing, coercion, with the administrative/military personnel directly involved in their recruitment. Are you saying Nishioka (a civilian teacher) and opponent Higashi with the different point of view is the one you trust the most?

Yes. That's what the review report revealed which is also in line with Higashi's statement who was directly involved in the formulation of the Kono Statement. This is why Kono Statement in of itself was questionable for it gave the false 'impression'. Even when this fact became public, there were many within the Japanese public who are still requesting an official Diet hearing from Kono himself. This isn't really news. Academics were questioning the accuracy of Kono statement for little over two decades since the issuance for still, there are no evidence presented to support the portion of "and that, at times, administrative/military personnel directly took part in the recruitment.." in regards to Korean comfort women. NONE.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

nigelboy Mar. 04, 2015 - 08:27AM JST Yes. That's what the review report revealed which is also in line with Higashi's statement who was directly involved in the formulation of the Kono Statement. This is why Kono Statement in of itself was questionable for it gave the false 'impression'.

So what your saying is the conclusion by U.S. House of Representative is wrong?

Many of those involved in the 2007 US House of Representatives Comfort Women resolution 121, for instance, including Dennis Halpin, a former senior Asia policy staffer, said in September that: “There was ample documentary and testimonial evidence from across the Indo-Pacific region to support the fact that Imperial Japan organized and managed a system of sexual slavery for its military.

source: www.globalresearch.ca

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Many of those involved in the 2007 US House of Representatives Comfort Women resolution 121, for instance, including Dennis Halpin, a former senior Asia policy staffer, said in September that: “There was ample documentary and testimonial evidence from across the Indo-Pacific region to support the fact that Imperial Japan organized and managed a system of sexual slavery for its military.

Yes. There are plenty of documented evidence that the Japanese military organized and regulated private brothels attached to the military. Forceful recruitment, if any, were conducted by individual operators when it comes to Korean comfort women.

I believe CH3CHO gave a analysis on one of the Korean comfort women's testimony during the hearing. How any one could come up with so many versions of how they became one is simply amazing.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

How any one could come up with so many versions of how they became one is simply amazing.

Yep, and the sex slaves came from several different countries. How about that?

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Can someone explain to me how you apologize for something you deny?????? Good grief.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

zones2surf: I watch the back and forth between Japan and Korea as well as the back and forth here ...

That is a nice description of it.

There is a lot of back-and-forth at comments to a no-longer-available article on JT, at link below.

I was looking for a particular post, that at one foreign site (probably Taiwan or Indonesia), local girls who worked for Japanese businesses, in offices, etc., were picked for forced recruitment as comfort women, probably because they were already familiar with Japanese. But didn't find it, maybe it was deleted from this or another article.

https://www.japantoday.com/smartphone/view/national/asahi-apologizes-for-erroneous-fukushima-comfort-women-reports

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I have spent more time in Korea than anywhere else and Japan has historically treated Korea as a colony and probably will never feel like apologizing. Look at how they think of Okuba.....even in video games Okuba is the name some times used for a dumping ground or garbage site .

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

This issue should have been settled in 1965. Japan wanted to stipulate that some of the reparations paid would go to compensate alleged Korean victims; instead Korea used to money to build its steel industry.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

would go to compensate alleged Korean victims

So according to you, basically Japan didn't really recognise their existence, but gave them money anyway. How convenient

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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