politics

Japan to retain emissions cut goal despite calls for greater efforts

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So remember those headlines Koizumi made a few months ago about making climate change "cool" and "sexy"?

Yeah, as suspected that doesn't mean he is going to actually do anything whatsoever.

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Cool and sexy say it slowly with Jazz and you won't notice the water at your knees as the sky burns....one more time....cool and sexy.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Japan is already one of the largest OECD countries in the world with the lowest levels of pollution.

And the Toyota RAV4 is the world's greenest gasoline-powered car. An achievement for the Japanese engineer.

It's more. Japan was the first country to implement serious measures against climate change as early as 1991. It is the most advanced country in ecological technology. And they are decades ahead of the rest of the world.

So it's the world that has to follow in Japan's footsteps.

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With a population-weighted seasonal average of 67 parts per billion (ppb), Japan has the highest level of tropospheric ozone among nations in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, according to data in the report, which estimates the country had some 6,250 deaths attributable to ozone in 2017.

Toxic pollutants from power plant emissions have led to the appearance of acid rain throughout the country. In the mid-1990s, Japan had the world's fourth highest level of industrial carbon dioxide emissions, which totaled 1.09 billion metric tons per year, a per capita level of 8.79 metric tons per year.

Japan burns close to two thirds of its waste in municipal and industrial incinerators. By some estimates, 70 percent of the world's waste incinerators are located in Japan. As a result, Japan has higher levels of dioxin in its air than any other G20 nation.

Japan became known for pollution-related illnesses: Yokkaichi asthma, Minamata disease (mercury poisoning) — both named after the cities where they first appeared — and cadmium poisoning, known as itai-itai, or “ouch-ouch,” because of the excruciating bone pain it caused.

The nuclear disaster in 2011 has caused further pollution problems. The continuing burning of coal for power generation.

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