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Kan resigns; says he did all he could, given difficulties he faced

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I think he got a raw deal and actually feel kind of sorry for the guy. He wasn't the perfect PM, but I seriously doubt any other honest Japanese politician could have done a better job under the circumstances.

18 ( +16 / -1 )

Naoto Kan, the gaijin are with you! Don't give up! Japanese people, please WAKE UP!!!

10 ( +10 / -0 )

What papasmurf said.

Japan's loss.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

all the more reason we need to change the constitution to give the emperor some political power back. allow the emperor to issue out orders to put and end to the policitical nonsense that is not in the interests of the people of japan.

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

You couldn't blame him if he takes a bit of a break next, but I'm hoping that he continues to lead the push for an alternative energy future for Japan and to fight the good fight against oyabun Ozawa and the useless Hatoyama.

3 ( +2 / -0 )

another ineffectual Japanese PM completely devoid of any leadership abilities. Still, unlike the last 6 or 7 I had the feeling he at least meant to do the right thing.

-12 ( +1 / -13 )

Fortunate or otherwise, it's for Japanese people to decide. For me it's disappointing.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I agree with papasmurf. I think he honestly tried. However, being that there are so many different groups within the JGov, it's hard to do anything.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

So our choices are between someone unethical, a right-winger, and a guy facing criminal charges. Are we sure this ain't a pilot for a new comedy series? Yea, the future's lookin good Japan!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

That PM office has a turnover rate rivaling that of eikaiwa schools. It's sad that finding a competent person to do the job is so difficult.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I think it would have been better to call a snap election

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Wow, he actually lasted an entire year in office, this one. Amazing.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

SquidBert, that was the only true resolve, after all the political infighting with total disregard for the people suffering from 3/11. The japanese people should have had the right legally and morally to choose their next PM. Thank you Mr Kan , you showed, in you a japanese politician with integrity,honesty , a heart and a genuine concern for the people of Japan. You can resign , albeit under duress, with your head held high.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

So Kan. Now that you are retired you will have a lot of free time on your hands. Will you go to Fukushima Daiichi and help first hand with the clean up? I didn't think so.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

This is the danger of a parliamentary system........

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@ssway

Will you go to Fukushima Daiichi and help first hand with the clean up? I didn't think so.

I am sure there all sorts of valid critique against Mr. Kan, but you can hardly blame him for the decision to construct Fukushima Daiichi, that decision was taken a long time ago.

I am sure however that you could, if you tried, find a whole bunch of bureaucrats and regulators that together with some TEPCO officials should be forced to to clean every inch of the Fukushima Prefecture with their tooth brushes.

5 ( +5 / -1 )

ok go home & have a few cold ones you earned them, if fact have a few too many if you want!!!

The crap & truck loads of A-holes he had to deal with & who lied & thwarted left right & centre has & is hard as hell to watch!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

This is the danger of a parliamentary system........

As some-one from a country with a one-chamber parliamentary system, I would say the the two chamber system greatly adds to the mess. Maybe its just me being unfamiliar with two chamber systems, but it seems to me to remove control from the public.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This is the danger of a parliamentary system........

I think the system is fine. It is the morons here inside that system that are the real problem. Parliamentary democracy has worked brilliantly for a much longer time in the UK, Australia, NZ and Canada to name a few, with general stability and calm. This joint just seems to have a pre-occupation with changing leaders for no real reason or benefit. Backroom politics seems to override the respect for the system. Good luck Mr.Kan - I reckon you did your best. At least you weren't one of Ozawa's chosen boys...

7 ( +7 / -0 )

put the emperor back in charge of the executive branch of government.

-7 ( +3 / -8 )

Agreed ... I think he did what he could and can held his head up high for trying to stand up to the bureaucrats, power companies and the long line of self serving leeches who pass for politicians here.. For all his strategic mistakes I still think he was the only one who honestly tried to fight on behalf of the little guy. Too bad his own divided party and the apathy stricken comatose voting public here didn't see it & give a damn enough ... Thanks for trying Mr. Kan

10 ( +10 / -0 )

Guy resigns Friday and there is a new guy by Tuesday? Why can't we have this type of speed for the disaster effort?

6 ( +6 / -0 )

What Marcelito said.

And now God help us all.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

“The latest power change will yet again give the world the impression that Japan’s leadership is fickle,”

Give the impression? I'd say "further cement the fact".

10 ( +10 / -0 )

So Kan. Now that you are retired you will have a lot of free time on your hands. Will you go to Fukushima Daiichi and help first hand with the clean up? I didn't think so.

The ink on his letter of resignation is barely dry, and you're complaining about what he hasn't done next week?

I reckon you did your best. At least you weren't one of Ozawa's chosen boys...

One of the reasons he was forced to resign.

And now God help us all.

Because Ozawa, Hato-kun and the LDP surely won't.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

If anybody is wondering why Japan's culture and economy are going down the toilet, this scape-goat is the 14th Prime Minister to be replaced in the last 16 years. As a result, while these children have been spatting over who is the playground boss the country is getting flushed!

4 ( +6 / -2 )

@sunhawk

put the emperor back in charge of the executive branch of government.

I hope you are joking. The Emperor has ZERO power to manage/control this country. He lost it when the country lost in WW2. Besides, we are in the year 2011...not in Edo-jitai....so why would we need to have "the Emperor" back in power?! What we need is RELIABLE/HONEST/HUMAN responsible people to work FOR THE PEOPLE!!!!!

Emperor back in charge?! Nonsense.

Time to get REAL.

p.s. Honestly, I always liked Kan for some unknown reason. All I can say is, what a terrible loss for our country. He did way better than the rest of shameless buffoons we had as PM's before him. (Aso, Fukuda, Hatoyama, etc.)

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Kan was alright. Next!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

He's done a BETTER job than the rest of the previous four combined, not a perfect PM but you're the best one at the moment. REALLY hate to see him go... and SOOOO disappointed with Japan's current political crisis!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

and SOOOO disappointed with Japan's current political crisis!

CURRENT?!? It's been like this for the past 20 years at least!!! (-_-)

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Even though he resigned as President of the DPJ, he is still the Prime Minister until Monday when they elect another poor guy to fill his shows.

I give the new guy....180 days..

0 ( +0 / -0 )

One of the few honorable politicians left in the Diet, he kept his word and left as promised. It's a shame that he was let down by ministry bureaucrats, local government, his own party and TEPCO. Sure he could have done better, but so could virtually everyone else involved.

The country owe him a debt of gratitude for storming round to the TEPCO office, and telling them to stay on site and fix the problem, even if they had to die. Had they abandoned the place, it would have been a lot worse. Everyone seems to have forgotten that decisive action by him.

Enjoy your break, but come back soon!

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Too bad the people of Japan don't have a direct say in who the next prime minister will be. Now we have to sit back and wait while a handful of politicians from the political party in power make their decision in backroom politics. But that's the way the system is set up. No matter who the winner will be, the Liberal Democrats and New Komeito will be waiting to attack the next prime minister. They are desparately awaiting their return to power ...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Good riddance. He's broken election promises, alienated his party, abused and ignored radiation victims and overseen an increasingly mishandled disaster recovery. The biggest disappointment is how, as a guy who has a track record of fighting on issues of social justice and against bureaucratic control of Japan, he basically sold out completely to the Finance Ministry and reversed most of the DPJ manifesto he helped create that got most of his party members elected. He ended up being another ministry agenda stooge, which shows to me that the job changed him. I used to think he was a good guy with faults, but now... I'm just glad this is over and someone else can start trying to pick up the pieces.

I hope Maehara gets in next, and I hope he restores some competence to how the DPJ is run, and gives them a chance of surviving the next election (when they will probably lose, and the PM will change... again).

All the best to Kan and his wife/cousin.

Peace

-12 ( +1 / -13 )

There goes the best PM Japan has had in many years.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Just as a postscript, to his credit, in over 10 years of Japan Today, I don't think I've ever seen a Japanese PM even half as popular. Even Koizumi was despised by a majority of commenters here. He certainly deserves credit for being able to have popular appeal with people outside Japan at least - if only he could have done half as well within Japan.

Peace

7 ( +7 / -0 )

power-grabbing at its finest!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I will miss Naoto Kan's sincerity as a PM. He was level-headed, tried hard to improve relations with Japan's neighbors, showed respect for Japanese and non-Japanese alike, and refrained from making embarrassing racist remarks unlike most of the other politicians.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

its a trap!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

He wasn't perfect, but I had a general good opinion about him. I'm sorry. I hope that Maehara will be the next PM, just because I read he is the only one, between the candidates, who agrees with Kan's anti-nuclear policy.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

feel sorry for the history students who have to memorize all the names of the PM................ must be tough.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Kans resignation was dependant on 3 important pieces of legislation being passed He attained that,so perhaps he can retire with some dignity. I just hope who ever is now chosen to replace him does not back track on Kans hopes to gradualy replace the nuclear reactors with renewable energy

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Now I would like to see you choose someone respectable as a new prime minister

So would we all Mr Kan so would we all.

The latest power change will yet again give the world the impression that Japan’s leadership is fickle,”

No kidding.

He did try to do the right thing but was right up against it all the time, he did't get a fair go and I feel given different times and circumstances he could have done a hell of alot more and alot better, but it wasn't meant to be.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Down goes Kan! Down goes Kan! And yet another Japanese PM resigns after only a year in office.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

He did all he could? This idiot demanded to visit the reactor site right after the damage occurred. As a result TEPCO delayed the release of the hydrogen pressure build up in Reactor 1. The first explosion "might" have been prevented if his sorry excuse of a PM had not demanded to visit on site immediately following the earthquake to showboat.

His inept handling of this situation could very well become the downfall of Japan as a nation.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

Given the situation, I really think PM Kan did all that he could. I just wished that he was given more time to resolve the problems hounding the country. He can't make miracles, same as all of the leaders. Changing PM often doesn't paint a good image of Japan, esp to the world; it just shows instability. Japanese leaders shouldn't give in to pressure, every President experiences that, even Pres Obama! Just stick it out 'til the end!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

if the emperor had official political power again, he could provide a stabilizing force to counter the revolving door premier-ship in the diet. our government needs substantial reform on the constitutional level.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

His inept handling of this situation could very well become the downfall of Japan as a nation.

It's like to say that Obama is the guilty for USA's downfall. Actually, the process which is bringing to the downfall of the developed nations started many years ago.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

ssway - yeah as a leader of the country in crisis he wanted to visit the damaged reactor as soon as he could to see for himself and I actually give him credit for that...TEPCO chose not to vent even before his visit despite being ordered to do so, thats not Kan,s fault - if it wasn,t for him getting p...d off with them , they would have actually abandoned the site.. Show me one bafoon among current Japanese politicians who would have handled the crisis any better - you think Hatoyama, Aso ,Fukuda would have? ...or Tanigaki ?...don,t make me laugh!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I believe Koizumi would have handled it better then any of the PMs that have come after him.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

I actually like Kan. I think he set out to do good but he was up against a bureaucracy filled with self serving, selfish and narrow sighted idiots. Japan got hit by Fate's demolition ball in March and it would have been nice, to say the least, to see all the politicians putting agendas aside and focusing on folk directly affected by the disaster. Instead, we got a squabbling crowd of brats, centre stage and using all their energy to get Kan to resign. Kan held himself in a dignified fashion. I really don't know where Japan is headed to now.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

@sunhawk

I believe Koizumi would have handled it better then any of the PMs that have come after him.

Koizumi? LOL!!! The former PM that has never seen the last child he had with his ex-wife before they got divorced?? Are you sure you want that kind of person as a PM to represent our country in the world stage? I remember how nationalistic and xenophobic he was, praying to war criminals and all...

Keep Koizumi buried in the dark. Thank you.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Keep Koizumi buried in the dark. Thank you.

I agree. It's amazing how people are so influenced by looks and charisma.

Naoto Kan wasn't perfect, but he had integrity, which can't be said for most of the other muttering, bumbling, buffoons in parliament. I liked him too.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

better koizumi then some inept suits that apologize for everything and talk about being regretful for things we shouldn't!

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

I hope Japanese people are not tempted by LDP again. It's LDP, with its 50 years of almost uninterrupted government, that has created the conditions for the actual crisis in Japan, even with its nuclear policy. The new government with DPJ has only received LDP's bad inheritance, just like poor Obama, who is blamed for everything, has only received Bush's bad inheritance

3 ( +3 / -0 )

better koizumi then some inept suits that apologize for everything and talk about being regretful for things we shouldn't!

Sorry, what?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@ssway

Your suggestion that Kan's visit stopped Tepco venting and preventing the explosion is absurd - pure LDP propaganda. TEPCO is the only one to blame for their mishandling of the situation, including their turning off the emergency core cooling system.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Mr. Kan- look between your legs and find what's missing. If you ain't part of the solution you are part of the problem. And now for someone with even bigger words, less ideas and smaller cojones.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Readers, the emperor is not relevant to this discussion. Please stay on topic.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Kan is IMHO the most decent politician on the Japanese stage that I have perceived since I got interested in contemporary Japan. His decisions in the wake of 3/11 were not always the right ones. His handling of SPEEDI was clearly a mistake.

The emperor and Kan did a good job this year. They addressed the fear of people. They did what they could. Kan has been the head of state, where the body is ripe with corruption, infighting, nationalism, mismanagement and economic disease. And now with a nuclear disaster at hand. I really hope that he comes back into the political scene after a while. Maybe not for Japan, but for an international institution. He'd deserve it.

The emperor as a public face is very valuable. Since his power is only the power of the word, he is free from all these political games. He can really follow his conscience and help Japan find an orientation in times of crisis. If Japan didn't have an emperor, they would have to elect someone for a similar rôle. Regarding the typical bickering of Japanese politicians, I think the emperor is a better option.

Each people has the leaders they deserve. Nothing to be added.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

And that's the coup d'grace. Brace yourselves. The ride just got bumpier. All the candidates to replace Kan have DOOM TO JAPAN written all over them.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Hey Darren, at least you are not publicly castrating the man, hahaha! I wish more elected politicians could follow Mr Kan's footsteps, at least towards resignation when failing to do their job, eg Obama.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Johannes, sorry but what the heck is IMHO?? You and some others keep writing that here and I have no idea what IMHO is and what to make of it in this context. Do I have to Google up IMHO?? Anyway, Kan tried his best, way better that than fool Aso.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@Elbuda - it means "in my humble opinion".

Kan seemed sincere enough but I agree that there wasn't much he could have done differently, and his party shackled him with ridiculous vote-buying, budget-bankrupting "promises" that he didn't have much choice but to back away from.

Koizumi may have been a nationalist who got away with it because of his charisma, but at least the nation performed well financially durnig his term. These days the government is spending three times what they take in, with the deficits presumably to be paid by today's younger workers. All I want from the next PM is a promise of a balanced budget.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Thanks Thon, but IMHO, would be more like In Hy Mumble Opinion?? Thanks anyway. All I want from our Japanese PM is for them to fix the Fukushima Tepco power plant and to help turn Japan from nuclear power to some safer cleaner form of energy ASAP!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@Elbuda Mexicano

sorry but what the heck is IMHO??

IMO=In my Opinion

IMHO=In my Honest Opinion

Because English is not my native language, it took me ages to learn many of these abbreviations...The amazing Internet Language.. it is.... lol (^_~)

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Prime Minister Kan worked hard and in the circumstances what more could he do?

I will remember him as a true leader who placed his position on the line for the good of Japan.

The Renewable Energy bill, the restructuring of the Nuclear Energy and Safety infrastructure, and the recovery bill are tremendous accomplishments of which Japan should be proud.

All this, spoken from a foreigner.

I can only hope that Japan will now lead the world in renewable energy. Science is good, but the technology has not reached a level where Nuclear energy can be handled safely. It is time to reconsider and take bold steps. I hope this has begun.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

"This is the danger of a parliamentary system........"

lostrune2: If by "danger" you mean the ease and frequency with which the prime minister's office changes leaders, you are incorrect. A quick glance at the UK, Canada, and Australia shows that a prime minister can stay in office for a long time (even longer than a two-term US president) in a parliamentary system.

No, what's happening in Japan now is an indictment not of parliamentary democracy or even Mr. Kan, but parliamentary democracy Japan-style. The Japanese are famous for importing ideas and concepts from abroad and tweaking them here and there to make them suit Japan, but they've blown it with their political system. A bicameral legislature in which both houses have actual power is workable in a US-style system that also has a strong, separately elected chief executive, but it's a potential disaster in an ostensibly Westminster system where supreme power is supposed to reside in one main parliamentary body. A bicameral structure in which both houses have power is a recipe for endless gridlock, UNLESS one party is overwhelmingly dominant, as was the case in Japan during the Cold War with the LDP. But those days are gone.

Japan should seriously consider either abolishing the Upper House altogether or at least stripping that body of any power to delay the passage and implementation of much-needed laws.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

6 PMs in 5 years? The government in Japan is so unstable its laughable..

3 ( +3 / -0 )

He did all he could? This idiot demanded to visit the reactor site right after the damage occurred. As a result TEPCO delayed the release of the hydrogen pressure build up in Reactor 1. The first explosion "might" have been prevented if his sorry excuse of a PM had not demanded to visit on site immediately following the earthquake to showboat.

I find it hard to believe you are serious about this. With all the deception and witholding of information that TEPCO had been doing following the disaster, you're going to hang the blame for the hydrogen explosions (plural... as in THREE DIFFERENT BUILDINGS AT THREE DIFFERENT TIMES) on ONE visit by a Prime Minister who's being told by TEPCO that the problem is "under control" and there's no need to worry? Or perhaps you believe that once the first explosion happened, the others were inevitable and nothing TEPCO could have done after the Prime Minister's visit could have prevented them? A leader can only perform well if his subordinates and constituents give him accurate and timely information. TEPCO failed in every regard when it comes to those things.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Next up number 7 and in quick order #8 and 9. Things will not change until the people of Japan show some loyalty to our leaders.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@MASSWIPE

"This is the danger of a parliamentary system........"

lostrune2: If by "danger" you mean the ease and frequency with which the prime minister's office changes leaders, you are incorrect. A quick glance at the UK, Canada, and Australia shows that a prime minister can stay in office for a long time (even longer than a two-term US president) in a parliamentary system.

No, what's happening in Japan now is an indictment not of parliamentary democracy or even Mr. Kan, but parliamentary democracy Japan-style. The Japanese are famous for importing ideas and concepts from abroad and tweaking them here and there to make them suit Japan, but they've blown it with their political system. A bicameral legislature in which both houses have actual power is workable in a US-style system that also has a strong, separately elected chief executive, but it's a potential disaster in an ostensibly Westminster system where supreme power is supposed to reside in one main parliamentary body. A bicameral structure in which both houses have power is a recipe for endless gridlock, UNLESS one party is overwhelmingly dominant, as was the case in Japan during the Cold War with the LDP. But those days are gone.

Japan should seriously consider either abolishing the Upper House altogether or at least stripping that body of any power to delay the passage and implementation of much-needed laws.

YES YES YES!!! EXACTLY!!!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I'm glad Kan has gone....

... because I'd like to see him now WRITE A BOOK that blows the lid off all the corruption and cosy deals that create the stench that is Japanese politics. Maybe then the Japanese people will wake up and demand accountability from their politicians instead of this 'shoganai' lethargy. Kan has nothing to lose now and can continue to be a thorn in the fat belly of these hopeless cretins that remain.

Mr Kan, your heart was in the right place and for that I thank you.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Things will not change until the people of Japan show some loyalty to our leaders.

What are you talking about?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

All phasers were not fired. Disappointing.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

My sympathies.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'm glad Kan has gone....... because I'd like to see him now WRITE A BOOK that blows the lid off all the corruption and cosy deals that create the stench that is Japanese politics.

That's funny, hatsoff - I was actually thinking the very same thing today! I can't imagine, however, there would exist the freedom in Japan to publish such a book. I mean, there would be so many big players who have benefitted from the cosy big business/politics/yakuza relationships here for decades - ie the power industry and the politicians of both sides they have paid off - that it would never get to print. We can only hope though...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

papasmurfinjapanAUG. 26, 2011 - 01:26PM JST I think he got a raw deal and actually feel kind of sorry for the guy. He wasn't the perfect PM, but I seriously doubt any other honest Japanese politician could have done a better job under the circumstances.

Absolutely agree with you, It's true, Kan was not perfect but he's been through sheer hell during his term. I mean just look at the Mr Kans face, it tells the whole story. At least now he can get some rest.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

YES YES YES!!! EXACTLY!!!

Bluewitch -- agree with your opinion of Masswipe's post. Japan has managed to produce six decades of politicians, but no real legislators. All they do is focus all their time on party politics, factions, funding, etc. And no time on actually being a public servant and working to pass meaningful legislation. And their supposed "debates" are just a joke -- just ranting and raving and flinging insults. They have dumbed-down/made childish even their own political system. Real pity.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I've lost track now of the number of Prime Ministers who've come and gone in the years that I've been here. It seems that just when I start to remember one's name, he's already gone and it's someone new.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I've lost track now of the number of Prime Ministers who've come and gone in the years that I've been here. It seems that just when I start to remember one's name, he's already gone and it's someone new.

Ha ha! Too true. To put things in perspective - I've seen 7 Japanese PMs in my 7 years here. In my 35 years I have had only 6 Aussie PMs!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

How can people say that Kan didn't sell out to bureaucrats? He was owned by the Finance Ministry, and is backing pro-Nuclear Noda to replace him, just because the guy supports his Finance Ministry technocrat agenda to raise sales tax.

This has a lot to do why a reasonably well liked guy ended up with a 16% approval rating.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

So, should we expect the release of his autobiography—“The Adventure of Uncle KAN-cle berry Finn”?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Next should be a jail cell. He deliberately released radiation in the sea. Then he instructed Japanese people to feed contaminated fish to their children. Which is worst, killing nature or the human? Both are crime.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

Well, at least he bowed and gave the apology. I suppose all will be good now, and the next leader will step up and immediately improve everything that is going wrong these days in Japan.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@BlueWitch

Okay, I admit that I am not Japanese, I don't even understand how all of this works. However, there should be one thing in common to Kan resigning as PM: He really did do all that he possibly could to set things back in order in Japan, and that he really meant to do what was right to begin with regardless of what anyone says. So basically we should at least give Kan-san(Did I say his name right?)his much needed dues because I feel that he stood his ground knowing that it was not going to be easy having to put things back together.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Adrian Luis MaisonetAug. 27, 2011 - 03:36AM JST

@BlueWitch

Okay, I admit that I am not Japanese, I don't even understand how all of this works. However, there should be one thing in common to Kan resigning as PM: He really did do all that he possibly could to set things back in order in Japan, and that he really meant to do what was right to begin with regardless of what anyone says. So basically we should at least give Kan-san(Did I say his name right?)his much needed dues because I feel that he stood his ground knowing that it was not going to be easy having to put things back together.

But if you want my humble opinion on Kan, I'll be delighted to give it to you.

I really liked him and still do. I feel its a great loss for our country to lose such an individual who had his own beliefs and went against typical nationalistic/xenophobic bureaucracy. He never went to Yasukuni, you know? He showed he didn't need to follow outdated/draconian nonsense in order to please the very old crusty/greasy geezers in the government, most of them are actually descendants from the REAL war criminals.... and they do worship them, regardless of the atrocities they committed. YUCK!

Overall, Kan was a good PM, far from perfect but, he did the best he could under extreme hostile circumstances. (Note that he wasn't one potatoe-face Ozawa's chosen boys!) He has my respect, period.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Kan did best he can considering Japan has continous problem with their political system. The Japanese bureaucracy places greater value on maintaining group harmony than on discovering the truth of the matter or facing. reality. In fact, in order to maintain group harmony, there is nothing unethical about lying in Parliament or in court. The basic principle of the Japanese bureaucracy is that neither the people nor the system take responsibility. No wonder nothing gets done properly. Whoever takes over Kan's position will inherit the same bureaucratic problem of Japan and cannot do nothing about it. This is kind of tragedy for Japan.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Hyagal should probably have his account deleted for his racist remarks. It's amazing how ignorant people get when hiding behind pseudo-anonymity.

Obama didn't start ANY wars, those were started by other leaders. He inherited 2 of them and was involved in the third because of alliance agreements. Placing blame on Obama for those wars is just as incomprehensible as placing blame on Kan for the hydrogen explosions at Daiichi because he visited the site.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I think Kan is basically a good and honest person. He lacked leadership qualities, but looking back did any Japanese PM really lead? Kan should've appointed leaders who could kick butt after the Great Earthquake and Tsunami. Never mind what the opposition is haggling about. Another problem is Japan is mired with too many political parties. The bad thing is, if you can't along or don't like someone in the party, you quit and form your own party, Think Kamei Shizuka, Minna no Tou, Shintou Nippon etc. Coalitions get too broad, and nothing gets done. I doubt if any in the current contenders for PM will be any better than Kan.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I think Kan Did the best that anyone could in his post as PM. Best wishes and good luck to you in your future endeavors.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

he was the next on the list he could not be reponsible for his own nation. sinds the tsunami disaster he could not make decision what to do in that case. who will be the next one?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@papasmurfinjapanAug. 26, 2011 - 01:26PM JST

Naoto Kan isn't perfect? Who is better?

The last 20 years Japan had economic problem. The last 5 years Japan had problem of change PM. Process of change PM is kick to Japan. Politics system and system of management of Japan is degradation. No one PM can't quickly solve of Fukushima and 11.03 problems. That is not Kan problem. Kan is very sensible. May be Japanese society have habit living without terrible stress because society is very capriciously. I suppose that Japanese politics and parliament must take upon oneself responsibility. But they have many emotions also for world relationships.

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Hikozaemon post best describes the public perception of Kan and why his approval rating dwindled. You simply can't dismiss the Manifesto and expect his own party members to go along with you especially in light of the fact that he was elected (lower house election) based on those promises to the public.

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Well, anyone will be the next japanese pm, I just hope that he will follow an anti-nuclear policy, and a friendly foreign policy with his asian neighbors.

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@Alex80

Well, anyone will be the next japanese pm, I just hope that he will follow an anti-nuclear policy, and a friendly foreign policy with his asian neighbors.

I hope so too~~ (-_-)

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Joseph Clark Grew (May 27, 1880 – May 25, 1965) was a United States diplomat in Japan and career foreign service officer his famous words:" Japanese thinking is 2000 yrs out of date" Therefore From date:Friday, 26 August 2011 (Gregorian calendar) Subtracted 2000 years =Wednesday, 26 August 0011 (Julian calendar)

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I am not expecting anyone better to replace him. In fact, I expect it will be someone I won't like at all and won't do anything better.

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The people attacking Kan are clueless, just repeating the rightwing propaganda spread by the youmuri and other sources. Kan was not a corporate slave type or a retarded grandson of a former PM. He had the whole Japanese government stacked against him, including the thief Ozawa. How Kan beat Ozawa is unclear, but he did and gave Japan a chance to redeem itself. Well, once he started to bypass the corrupt ministries he was doomed. The J press attack dogs went after him.

The reason Kan gets some support here is that most gaijin are not poisoned by the local mainstream media everyday. They can see the man for what he was, honest, deliberate, mistrustful of the ministries after he discovered the Ministry of Health spread AIDS in Japan to help the blood companies profits, and willing to stand up for the J people rather than business 100% of the time, as the LDP does for example.

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Kan is alright. I feel he has heart and sincerity.

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Kan says he did all he could with all the difficulties he faced, like not having a backbone or an ounce of creativity. Why is anyone surprised? That's the kind of psychology this country's culture creates.

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People seem to have forgotten that Kan was allegedly also guilty of accepting funds from a foreign, (Korean?) and would have had to step down if the allegations were proven to be true. His position was saved for the time being because of the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear meltdown.

He would have been gone either way.

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This is still pretty sad though. Not having a secure head of government for no more than a couple of years or less? No stability = little to no progress.

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Noda - more taxes? lazy way out.

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There is no one politician any better than the others. As soon as the dust settled and the waves receded, talk of "post-Kan" began. I was extremely angered at the media circus in the Diet day after day, politicians all arguing while people in Tohoku were (and are) suffering terribly. They're all vultures.

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