politics

Lower voting age leaves many wondering: 'Where's Japan's Bernie Sanders?'

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By Linda Sieg

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Almost every politician in Japan is already a Bernie Sanders. They all make big promises they don't intend to keep, and couldn't keep even if it were possible. They all spend freely, with no thought of how much debt they are racking up, and without any thought as to how this debt will be repaid. They all believe that it is the government which should control and plan all matters, despite it's record of universal failure.

Sanders is popular because people think he can fix the government. But it seems his only plan to fix the government is to give it more power and more money, which, given the government's track record, will make things only worse, as the same people who are running things now will have more power to coerce, and money to squander.

-21 ( +8 / -29 )

True, but it's image over substance in politics, and Sanders is seen as appealing to thew youth vote. More "free" stuff for everyone.

Judging from the quotes in this article, Japanese youth seem to have a far better grasp of the issues than American youth.

-13 ( +6 / -19 )

Lower voting age leaves many wondering: 'Where's Japan's Bernie Sanders?'

Have these youths not heard of 日本共産党? They are the Bernie Sanders of Japan. They even have an English site, discussing the issues:

http://www.japan-press.co.jp/

7 ( +10 / -3 )

Could there be a connection between Japan's "children first" family contract and the youths obvious political apathy? Thinking that the older generation will take care of everything? Few college kids have to worry about paying for their own college education.

Maybe these grassroots organizations would be better served if they just bought enough of the latest smartphones and handed them out to every 18 and 19 year old who can show proof that they voted in the national election. By the next election, create and promote an adorable tiny stuffed mascot (a lot cheaper) for the 18 to 25 year olds.

In three of four elections:

Young adult A: Hey did you vote?

Young adult B: Nope

Young adult A: あなたはクールではありません

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Maybe it could come in the future but for now, a 'Bernie Sanders' cannot rise in Japan unless he came from the existing set of political families - Politics in Japan, at the top at least, is based on family dynasties.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

'Where's Japan's Bernie Sanders?'

Couldn't find anyone that young?

10 ( +11 / -1 )

Surveys show young Japanese are more likely than their elders to support Abe’s conservative LDP, echoing a risk aversion that runs through mainstream Japanese society.

What? Noooo!! Tell me it's not true. This is so depressing.

9 ( +11 / -2 )

I have my hopes this fellow, Tamaki, will become Prime Minister someday soon -- educated in Japan and the USA, his view is not only Japan but the world. He attracts both the youth vote and elderly vote in Kagawa ken.

http://www.tamakinet.jp/

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Tamaki is Japan's Bernie Sanders.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Where is America's Bernie Sanders is what I want to know. Looks like he got robbed. And I am curious where exactly sangetsu03 and commanteer get their ideas about Bernie Sanders. Do you guys have half a clue how much money the US throws at the military? A living wage, expanding public education from high school through college, and a public health care plan is not "free stuff". Other countries are doing those things and doing just fine. They can all be accomplished in America by simply rolling back the obscene amounts America throws at the military, which is literally all other countries' military spending combined. America is rich beyond belief, its just that we have super leeches that need to be dealt with, and yes, Bernie has ideas to deal with them.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Well, the number of Japanese people who have worked on a kibbutz is rather small, I imagine, so not many future Bernie-samas to choose from, either.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

That's a good one -"where's japan's Bernie Sanders?"

For one thing, Japan's mums and pops would be saving fortunes (literally) if higher education was "free" for their sons/daughters. One thing I like about Japanese is that they're full of responsibility and never expect(ed) "free" stuff.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

In the climate that is japan's politics, a maverick like Bernie would be forced out of politics.

'Where's Japan's Bernie Sanders

Here's the REAL question:

'Where' are Japan's people who would vote and back a Japan's Bernie Sanders?

6 ( +7 / -1 )

In the climate that is japan's politics, a maverick like Bernie would be forced out of politics.

Agree. Bernie Sander's is an old political cat who's been around the block. A new, young, bright, hopeful Japanese aspiring to be politician (in Japan) with Sanders-like views prob couldn't even get his "foot-n-the-door" let alone being forced out of politics.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Has anyone asked the question, Why ask such a question, looking for Sanders in Japan?

We have two totally different cultures and histories with different social, economic and political environment. Why do we want to or even have to "compare" personalities and voting habits or tendencies?

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Hiroyuki Arai wants to print money (Abenomikkus) for the benefit of families and the weak (aka Kateinomikkus). He is opposed to nuclear power and the privatusation of the post office, and in favour of Eastern medicine research, trade agreements with Korea and China, traditional culture. He is short. I think he is the only member of the New Rennaissance Party that he represents but I think he may appeal to young people.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Why do we want to or even have to "compare" personalities and voting habits or tendencies?

Because by comparing personalities, we can see our qualities and where we fall short. Let's be honest. Politics in Japan and it's politicians are about as exciting as watching wet paint dry on the wall. And compared to other modern global governments Japan seems to be failing it's people.

Japan needs a boost, a shot in tha' arm. Something new. Something that fits in with current times. For better or worse.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

I fear that politics in Japan drives talent away, not attract it. Hence the crybaby antics of those caught in the latest corruption fiasco of the month. That's hardly an attractive selling point.

You'd need a systematic change where dozens of dynasty candidates no longer want to run because they would be held to a higher standard that they could no longer reach by having to enunciate actual things.

Doesn't have to be a disaster to bring out the real leaders but if someone for example could champion self powered Japan, without nuclear, without thorium, without radiation, instead utilizing all the renewables and thermals and Ring of Fire advantages rather than ignoring them. Having a real plan.

If there was a ground swell of responsible energy use instead of more blue LEDs it might be interesting.

Geothermal would easily replace nuclear but the influx of solar in spite of the country and media also continues. There has to be a tipping point sometime when that starts to ruin the bought off politician.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I shine the votes they'd get if, instead of ice cream, manga, anime, Internet movies, and other bribes, they simply engaged in interesting and honest politics?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

This article is so misleading.

Who says the Japanese want a Bernie Sanders?

Abe has made so many missteps, no one blinked when Aso was brought back, Abenomics, Okinawa, tax raises, stagnant wages, constitution changes, and all there is are some articles about scattered protests or worried citizens, but then...

Nothing. Japanese people are and have always been unwilling to stand up as a whole. Study the history. They want an iron fist, they want to be controlled, and progress has never been welcomed, whether it be opening up to the west or challenging dictators.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

I fear you may be right, Harvey Pekar. They seem unwilling to do what is necessary to steady the slowly sinking ship that is their country. The best solution is to do the same as Australia and make voting compulsory. A 20 dollar fine does wonders for curing apathy. I very much doubt the current government's tactic of offering 18-19 year old voters ice-cream is going to work.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Japan's Bernie Sanders is in the same place as Japan's Einstein - working as a middle-management salaryman somewhere after years of cram school study and with "the nail that sticks up gets hammered down" ringing through his head has gotten rid of the drive to come up with something new and different, and then stick with it. Whether you like or agree with Bernie Sanders or not is irrelevant - he certainly did provide something DIFFERENT that not only defied the status quo - but went in opposition to it. Japan has a history of being very good with imitation - industry takes ideas invented overseas, and finds ways to improve on them and do it slightly better. But rarely do you see the new, creative, original ideas originating here...and that trickles through all aspects of life - arts, sciences, politics. The Japanese people who are born with the originality and drive to come up with bright new ideas (and there are many of these people!!) become wary of defying the status quo or upsetting communal harmony. An aspiring "Bernie Sanders" would likely have buckled long ago under the pressure of falling in line with the current government's ways, and backed off the rhetoric that would rock the proverbial ship.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Japan needs to fins a cure to Shouganai Syndrome before ANYTHING will change. Sorry that's the way it is so shouganai.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

sangetsu03 They all spend freely, with no thought of how much debt they are racking up, and without any thought as to how this debt will be repaid

Didn't the DPJ the last time they were in power have this committee headed by Renko that looked into gov't waste and grilled bereaucrats who created Amakudari avenues for themselves and senpais. Though the amount that could be saved was like a drop in the ocean, at least it was a step in the right direction. All that ended and has been forgotten with Abe taking the rein.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

More "free" stuff for everyone.

Naa..just free stuff for the farmers, construction companies and the well connected.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

sangetsu03JUL. 02, 2016 - 08:09AM JST

Almost every politician in Japan is already a Bernie Sanders.

In this context, for "Bernie Sanders" read "Anyone who isn't an ageing non-entity in a boring suit with his head covered in Grecian 2000."

Osaka_DougJUL. 02, 2016 - 10:05AM JST

I have my hopes this fellow, Tamaki, will become Prime Minister someday soon -- educated in Japan and the USA, his view is not only Japan but the world. He attracts both the youth vote and elderly vote in Kagawa ken.

It's nice to think there are at least one or two opposition politicians who show a bit of promise. Well, if he takes a shot at becoming DP President and makes them actually look like a viable party of government then who knows.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Reflecting their minority status in Japan’s fast-ageing society, voters aged 20-34 made up just 19 percent of the electorate in 2015 compared to the 55% who were 50 or older.

If that's the problem, maybe one idea would be to split Japanese voting population into 3 voting constituencies, 18-30 (young adults still finding their feet in society), 30-65 (the "working" established population) and >65, and give the young votes more weight so the 3 constituencies have equal power?

It isn't like each Japanese vote is exactly the same size anyway.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

And I am curious where exactly sangetsu03 and commanteer get their ideas about Bernie Sanders. Do you guys have half a clue how much money the US throws at the military?

I know exactly how much America throws at it's military, and it is far less than you think. America has spent more on welfare than on defense since Nixon was in office, did you know that? As for education, America spends about one-third per pupil more than other developed countries.

In the past, healthcare in America used to be quite affordable. It was rare that treatment and medical bills bankrupted people. But when healthcare became subsidized via medicare and state plans, costs skyrocketed; the deep pockets of government distorted the system, pushing up costs to the point where people needed to buy insurance to be able to pay for treatment.

What do I know about Bernie Sanders? What do you know about him? Do you know that he has been a politician his entire adult life? He has never worked in a shop, a store, or a factory. He knows nothing about people who earn an hourly wage, or live paycheck-to-paycheck. He has never hired or fired a worker, he has never had to write a check to pay someone's salary.

Bernie Sanders is the complete politician, and he plays the same card every politician plays; he promises to give you a free ride, and to charge someone else the cost of the ticket. And when the promise has to be met, and the free ride provided, the vehicle never shows up, and when that happens, he can blame "opposition" in congress for thwarting his plans. In the worst case scenario, you actually get the free ride he promised, but then after you hop in and are nearly to your destination, you notice that the meter is running. It turns out the free ride was not free after all, and you yourself actually have to pay for it.

In life there are no free rides, unless you are a politician.

What I dislike most about Bernie Sanders is his form of politics is so blatantly false, and unsupportable by reality. What is even worse is that people believe the things he says. I wonder how it is that people can be that dumb. But then again, to most people "Economics 101" is as far beyond their mental grasp as trying to create a non-linear equation to explain the variations of bubble formation in a stream of fast-moving water.

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

Sanders is popular because people think he can fix the government.

You clearly do not understand anything about Bernie. Nothing. His main idea, he repeats this all the time, is that government is in the hands of the rich and therefore the policies serve the rich. Same as here in Japan. The government does not need to be fixed as you incorrectly state in his view, it needs to be returned to its proper owners. The other 99%.

But when healthcare became subsidised via medicare and state plans, costs skyrocketed; the deep pockets of government distorted the system, pushing up costs to the point where people needed to buy insurance to be able to pay for treatment.

Now you proven that you are completely removed from reality. Fox news perhaps? Medicare was instituted in its first form in 1956 by President Eisenhower. You may not know about him, based on your other comments, but he was a Republican and former leader of the US Military in WW2. So that was 60 years ago. The massive increase in medical costs started in the 1980s under Reagan, as the insurance and drug industries bought off the republican party to serve their own selfish goals. You may want to check medical costs in the USA versus here in Japan which is a fully socialised medical system. Costs in Japan are about half that of the USA, and outcomes are better. Total government control, less cost. Fact. Obamacare has reduced the costs of medical care even though it is not a single payer system. Even just some government control of costs is helpful. When Hillary becomes President the USA will move on towards the Japanese system which is far superior to the broken system in the USA that you folks call free market.

Here is the prefect example of your type of free market healthcare, Mr. Martin Shkreli.

Martin Shkreli (/ˈskrɛli/;[4] born in 1983)[5] is an American entrepreneur and pharmaceutical executive. He is co-founder of the hedge fund MSMB Capital Management, co-founder and former chief executive officer (CEO) of the biotechnology firm Retrophin, and founder and former CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals. In September 2015, Shkreli received widespread criticism when Turing obtained the manufacturing license for the antiparasitic drug Daraprim and raised its price by 5,556 percent (from US$13.5 to US$750 per tablet) leading him to be referred to by media as the "most hated man in America".[6]

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Miyake Yohei, if he manages to get elected...dude is drawing some serious crowds while the media pretends he doesn't exist

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Judging from the quotes in this article, Japanese youth seem to have a far better grasp of the issues than American youth.

You don’t suppose the reporter selected such quotes to support the line she takes in the article?

And, I would imagine that it’s rather hard to get quotes from apathetic young people or those who told the reporter to buzz off.

Nothing. Japanese people are and have always been unwilling to stand up as a whole. Study the history. They want an iron fist, they want to be controlled, and progress has never been welcomed, whether it be opening up to the west or challenging dictators.

I have studied Japanese history and I would come to the opposite conclusion. Overall, especially in the modern period, the Japanese seem to have preferred rather vague and indecisive leadership. Further, Japan has a long and often violent tradition of civil unrest. Moreover, Japan has not had a single Western-style dictator in its modern history. Even Tojo who is often described in Western but not Japanese writing as a dictator was no such thing and when told to clear his desk and go home in 1944, he did.

And, why Bernie Sanders? What about a Japanese Donald Trump? Or, a Japanese Silvio Berlusconi?

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Media only focuses on certain parties, the rest is .....

Anyone seen a mention of minor party members, heck even Komeito goes short.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

It's a little hard to understand why anybody should expect a politician like Bernie Sanders to gain popularity in Japan, unless you think Japan's political development resembles what has gone on in the United States. But it does not.

The single biggest, most consequential, and most depressing development about politics in the USA over the last 20 or so years is that many white voters in mostly southern but also other states have abandoned any pretenses of supporting populism and have instead thrown their support behind the most shameless, unadulterated bunch of corporate shills and antediluvian, retrograde, parochial, know-nothing miscreant politicians you can imagine. Just look at the average Republican politician from South Carolina or Mississippi. No surprise many American voters turned to Sanders as an alternative to a disgusting ideology that combines unbridled corporatism and militarism.

Japanese politicians may leave a lot to be desired, but they do appear to be held in check by an electorate that is not quite as inclined to be so servile, slavish, and sycophantic in the face of extremely wealthy people.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

And when the promise has to be met, and the free ride provided, the vehicle never shows up,

sangetsu03, you could really do with fewer metaphors and more factual examples, you know that? Its pointless any of us trying to argue with a metaphor. Say something precise about Sanders, you know, something he supported that wrecked havoc. You speak of rising medical costs. Tie that directly to Sanders please. We seriously are not here to do YOUR homework. Or, if you just actually don't have a case, say so.

I will tell you some FACTS about Sanders. He opposed segregation and protested for it to go. He was against U.S. meddling in the Vietnamese Civil War. How much money did we throw down the drain on Vietnam?

He has never worked in a shop, a store, or a factory. He knows nothing about people who earn an hourly wage,

He has worked as a teacher and a carpenter. Oops!

Despite your doom and gloom garbage, he was mayor of Burlington, Vermont and he kept his promises and the city did just fine. He got reduced fees for cable, and lo and behold, that "free ride" worked out just fine. And he saved Burlington's waterfront from being a place for fat cats to rob the people. Its parks, houses, public beaches and bike paths still today. Under Sanders it was the first American city to fund community-trust housing. And the city survived, and prospered.

As U.S. Rep he voted against invading Iraq. We would have saved a bundle had everyone listened to him. He voted against the Patriot Act and when it passed, pushed for amendment after amendment to protect our rights. He voted to keep the Glass–Steagall Legislation in place. It was repealed. That led to the Financial Crisis of 2007-8. Again, should have listened to Bernie. Its SO not Bernie bankrupting us.

He supported gay rights LONG before that was popular. He supports vets and soldiers (and I do hold that against him as we could never have fought our wars of enriching the rich without their unquestioning willingness to invade and destroy).

See there? FACTS. Your turn.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

It is still the Age of Political Dinosaurs in Japan. Until an event near the scale of the asteroid occurs, the Political Mammals will not thrive.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@It"S ME I agree. They should mention Komeito more. They are LDP's "partners in crime" and, as such, are responsible for new security laws, chilling of a free media, restart of nuclear power, proposed change in article 9, lack of reform of education and regulation, lack of seriousness regarding effects of population decline, etc. But Komeito flies under the radar in the English and foreign press - escaping scrutiny.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

In reality the voting age should have probably been left alone not reduced to 18. The kids are not growing up. Actually I like the coming of age 20 thing in Japan. That seemed about right to me. It was international pressure to make it 18 in Japan since we use that age for age of majority but in reality we'd all probably benefit from it being raised a couple of years as well.

For example, all kinds of diseases like smoking and smoking weed and other drugs have been shown to affect the brain in 19 year olds and less, so raising majority age to 20 would have solved a lot of mental illness cases where those are the result of teen experimentation.

The results of binge drinking as well could also have been alleviated.

Businesses needn't have feared change. It's not like there isn't a cohort of 20 year olds and up available. Science needs to be used to help not ignore our kids, and certainly not ignore them for someone else's profit

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Shallots.

Just posted your comment to my Komeito contact. Yours is not the 1st voice, they will reply soon.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@sf2k

This is what the Japanese kids mostly think too: we are uninterested, therefore, don't challenge us to get interested. Most of Japan's big problems will impact them more. Can you give an example of the international pressure you speak of? I see you want to discourage youth involvement in democracies in other countries too. Why do I find your logic depressing? Perhaps it's that I think, when it comes to uni students in Japan, they are shallow enough as it is. If Japanese youth must be that disengaged, let's limit this to Japan and not spread it around!

@It"S ME

..."my Komeito contact."

Let us in on the psychology of your Komeito friend. Why would anyone support them? I understand being conservative and wanting a normalized military. But the chill on press freedoms, the lack of education and work reform, the increasing poverty and continued disenfranchisement of the poor and women...No idea why people support that stuff. Even my conservative friends think Japan needs something even stronger than social reform. The status quo of Komeito/Jiminto? Why? Ask your friend.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Shallots.

Walk down to your City-Hall and ask those questions directly to your local Komeito official.

I am not here to answer those questions, do your own research.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@It"S ME The research is in! The Komeito/Jiminto government fails to improve the lives of working people or engage young people in politics. The "Bernie Sanders" will be someone more like Mizuho Fukushima, perhaps. Though, she also doesn't seem to grab the attention of the thought-proof youth.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

If the research is in why pester me with your questions?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@It"S ME Well...you said you had a contact. I apologize though. Let my comments be directed away from you and at Komeito supporters wherever they are (they are everywhere!). Komieto-Jiminto has been a failure for Japan. If young people could (magically) become more engaged, we'd have more hopefulness about what comes next. Presently, there is only this chasm. In the meantime, let us be mindful not to pester each other.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

This will get your head spinning.

Just because I support Komeito don't mean I support or approve of Jiminto . If they were the same why vote Komeito?

My own country has been ruled mostly by the Socialist part but the Freedom party(right wing) is gaining even more than the Green, Democratic or Communist Party.

I always vote Green btw.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@sf2k If young adults are seemingly less and less mature, its for treating them like children until they are older and older. Banning things for teenagers is not stopping smoking, binge drinking or reckless sexual activity. In fact, all signs point to making them worse as what I see is that these things have gotten worse as the age for EVERYTHING as going up and up. If you want young adults to act like young adults, you need to treat them like young adults, and not be all condescending and controlling.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@It"S ME ah! You do support Komeito! But you don't want to take responsibility for their government! I don't want to pester you, in particular, but maybe some day someone from the Komeito camp will provide coherence. It's a neat trick if the parties in power never have to answer for the way they exercise such power. This sounds like some of my students: I didn't do the homework because I was absent!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

As a non-voting foreigner I can't take responsibility but I do support parties that can control/counter the majority one.

DPJ has also failed here, so they can't provide a balance/counter against LDP, who else to vote for?

Let the ruling party run free and we get ....

Remember Hitler, etc was also democratically elected .

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@It"S ME Um...Hitler wasn't elected. He was subsequently appointed chancellor, but lost the two elections in which he ran. You have an eccentric view of government. Komeito has been a member of the ruling government since 2012 so they ARE the government and its current policies. DPJ is not IN the government. They are in the opposition, i.e. they oppose (some of) the government's policies. The ruling party IS running free with their Komeito partners and Komeito explicitly supports policies like changing the constitution to widen Japan's military engagements (is that a Buddhist principle? I can't find the sutra). Do you have any specific examples to clarify to what you refer? I can't make sense of it. I suspect a little bias here. Perhaps blanket support for Komeito is faith-based?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Shallots.

Komeito got their own agenda and goals.

Who is easier influenced an ally or an enemy?

And that is all I am going to say.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

If you are young, you should leave the country for greener pastures than waste time fooling yourself that voting would make a difference here. Come back after the crisis passes over and people thinking again.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@It"S ME You'd have to give an example of what you mean. Your Hitler example was off. I'd need a more concrete example of something factual to understand what specific policy you want to advance. You never answer any factual questions, consider examples of policy I've brought up (like Komeito's support for constitutional revision to allow Japanese participation in U.S. wars), admit factual mistakes, etc., so perhaps there is no real conversation here. I cannot follow your thought pattern or find any tangible content in it. Perhaps you just have faith in Komeito. That's OK. If you feel that way, then there is not much point since there is no common basis from which to discuss politics. Maybe you should have said that to begin with. Honestly, when it comes to faith, we just have a disagreement since I think government should be justifiable using logic.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Have you read the Komeito Manifest if not I can't help you as Soka Gakkai and Komeito are different entities.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@It"S ME Both entities are reflected poorly here. I am quite wiling to look at the issue honestly. Furthermore, if there is an entity, political or otherwise, that advances just institutions, I would not cling dogmatically to a dismissive view but would rather seek to embrace it. Sadly, my suspicions are only confirmed. What I'd guessed about the groups you speak of becomes quite clear through the manner and substance of what you say about them.

“Our home towns will disappear. We won’t be able to raise children and there will be no future,” Okuda said at a recent event in Tokyo, warning about Japan’s bleak, depopulated future.

This is what worries me greatly for the next generation and what I see made mockery of in today's Japanese institutions. Public life, whether political or otherwise, becomes professional lying and deception at the risk of the next generation (both Japanese and global). If you've no wish to advance any positive view of Komeito or SG then there is no reason for either of us to worry about that. However, we still have the matter of a dearth of political voices to speak to the problems of the future.

And that is all I am going to say.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

We all have to make our own minds and chose our own paths, seems like your choice was made before starting the conversations here with me. I saw that very soon.

That is one thing I like about SG no one is pressured, etc into joining.

Religion is a personal choice and not something that should be put onto you like from parents, etc.

In my home-country we can chose our own religion at age 14 and even family, parents can't prevent/forbid that choice. I left the Protestant church at that age as there are too many things in Christianity I don't agree with.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@It"S ME

"...seems like your choice was made before starting the conversations here with me..."

I am always open to good reason, logic and expressions of compassion and love. However, your thought is a comfort since then you could not have done, and needn't do, anything different.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I am pretty sure that a fair share of your Students are SG members.

Myself didn't just join but spend 5yrs attending meetings and reading all the relevant texts in English of course.

I have found my human revolution and grown stronger and healthier from it. Not something that can be easily understood or explained here via this medium.

Keep searching you might find a good SG mentor as we value the mentor/disciple relationship.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

At last arrived at the outside, if only by age.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

zurcronium - Japan has a dual-payer system (similar to Germany), not socialized (UK) or single-payer (Canada). It is still universal, though.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Sanders has been against Wall Street and against income inequality. he means everyone should have equal income and everybody should graduated from college and he will make sure that. Meaning closing corporations.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

he means everyone should have equal income and everybody should graduated from college

No, that's not what me means.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

*he means

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

@shallots Isn't the Komeito party just an extension of some buddhist sect? So I'm pretty sure the members of that sect are the ones voting for the Komeito party, and probably not thinking too much about a lot of the issues you mentioned.

Surveys show young Japanese are more likely than their elders to support Abe’s conservative LDP, echoing a risk aversion that runs through mainstream Japanese society.

This is so sad. Don't they understand it's the LDP that are screwing them the hardest?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Japan is already a socialist country. and most of its pols are like Bernie Sanders, at least age wise.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Miyake Yohei drew 10,000 in Shibuya on Saturday evening: not a peep about it in the major media.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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