politics

Ishida says he'll work to patch up relations with China

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Now, if they could just stop squabbling about the Dokdo islands too....

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

In terms of International Relations Japanese are by and large straight shooters ; and so even with their best efforts they will not be able to manage a manipulative dragon with ulteriour motives. . .

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Yeah, a tough job for this, or any person. I this was my job, how would I respond to the demands from my boss to zero compromise regarding the disputed islands, and the belligerency and bitterness of my neighbor nations? I would feel like the lone guy patching up leaks in the Yamato the day it was sunk.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Neo-nationalism proves to be good for politics, but bad for business. Such is the confusion of globalization.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

warispeace : The Japanese CURRENTLY are by far NOT neo-nationalist. . . . . . . . .Naturally there are fringe elemnts in EVERY country................However it is simplistic to equate the NEED to protec national sovereignty with "nationalism".

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

In the spirit of new year's resolutions, and in entirely good faith, some suggestions for Mr. Kishida to help the possibility of warming relations with Japan's Asian neighbours.

Apologise for Japan's wartime atrocities. Property In the active form, as in: "On behalf of, and as a representative of, the nation of Japan, I offer the sincerest apologies of our country for [Nanjing Massacre/Korean sex slavery/Bataan Death March/Unit 731/other wartime atrocities (delete as appropriate)]." It may help to visit Korea or China and say this, and come August 15, the Emperor being to officially express his regrets/apology would be swell. This won't ease things immediately, but one good deed has a ripple effect, and may well lead to reconciliation. As it is, the unhealed wounds of the war are still festering, and corrupting relations in the present day.

When it comes to territorial disputes, try the softer line for once. Recognise that the Kuril Islands, the Senkaku/Diaoyu Rocks, and Dokdo, were all territorial seizures by force in wartime, which leaves the legitimacy of either side's claim rather vague. Don't cite treaties like the Treaty of Shimonoseki, or really any treaty that was secured at bayonet point during Japan's imperial expansion; by this logic Japan could still claim Taiwan as its territory. Chinese and Koreans will summarily dismiss any of these as Unequal Treaties, and will stand firm that their legitimacy is scuppered by the fact that they were signed under duress. Recognising this state of ambiguity will likely yield much more favourable results, including compromises such as joint resource development, than going in with all guns blazing saying "these rocks are the undisputable territory of Japan and we will not negotiate on this matter". That just gets everyone aggressive, and it leads nowhere nice.

Chew out - publicly - any politician who goes on record to say something stupid and racist. Say that these people are bigots who do not represent the peaceful and conscientious will of the Japanese people. Don't shy away from this just because the people concerned have rich and powerful daddies or the credulous support of racists in society at large.

Cut down on the ultra-nationalist rhetoric. Japan's Asian neighbours have more than a little reason to be rather skittish about the idea of Japan rearming, given that the atrocities are still within living memory for many. Having the top members of the establishment indulging in war nostalgia and denying that anything wrong was done does not help with the effort to portray Japan as a peace-loving nation. No, you do not have the right to expect the Koreans and the Chinese to "get over it". Japan did this, and as a representative and agent of the state you can own that responsibility.

Recognising the regional tensions, keep an open line with Beijing and Seoul, and even Pyongyang, on any potential shifts in Japanese foreign policy doctrine, particularly where military matters are concerned. When making announcements on matters such as Article 9, SDF deployment policy, etc, or even governance of maritime territory, have the ambassadors in each country briefed to be able to talk to the local press and give details.

These are some things I can think of that would do wonders. Right now, it seems as if Japan, Korea and China are still fighting the old wars, albeit via the proxy of modern territorial disputes. I'd love to see this end.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

Yes, return the islands to the original owner.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

@Fugasis, you know very well that there have been at least 40 apologies by verious politicians, academics, etc. to all people of Asia (see Wikipedia list, in English, Japanese, and Chinese). We apologize, but it is always "not sincere". There is really no use. Of course China and all those countries did not mind taking billions of Japanese yen for reconstruction of their economy, which they evidently did not tell their citizens about because judging by posts on the internet, they seem to know nothing about it. Technology transfer to China and free education to thousands of Chinese students (some were my classmates). This is unknown. And now he will have to deal with the issue of who has the oldest person in the world. China also claims to have the youngest...

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

@Fugacia, if you are resourceful, you could go to U-tube and find videos of individual Japanese citizens going to China to meet the people they imposed brutal conditions on, and apologizing. On U-tube, in front of the whole world. But, I guess that is not sincere.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

avigator-san,

Yes, return the islands to the original owner.

Which is . . . . ?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Original owner = Long De Chuan Ren

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Great post Fugacis.

Japanese are in a frantic search for anything that would indicate the islands belong to Japan. Like in Japan Times there is an article that says China had included the "Senkakus" as belonging to Japan. Even if did, it does not mean the islands belong to Japan. China could have indicated that the islands were under Japanese control because the US was administering the Okinawa Prefecture. The newly formed government was in no position to be in animosity terms with the US after a disastrous war in the Korean Peninsula.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Apologise for Japan's wartime atrocities. Property In the active form, as in: "On behalf of, and as a representative of, the nation of Japan, I offer the sincerest apologies of our country for [Nanjing Massacre/Korean sex slavery/Bataan Death March/Unit 731/other wartime atrocities (delete as appropriate)]." It may help to visit Korea or China and say this, and come August 15, the Emperor being to officially express his regrets/apology would be swell. This won't ease things immediately, but one good deed has a ripple effect, and may well lead to reconciliation. As it is, the unhealed wounds of the war are still festering, and corrupting relations in the present day.

All been done before - in Japan, in Korea, in communist china. All to no avail. No more apologies to anyone for the events of WW2 and no more compensation. Let the apology deniers stew in their own bitterness.

I certainly hope Mr Kishida does none of the things you recommend until the communists and the Koreans grow up and move into the 21st century.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

avigator-san,

Original owner = Long De Chuan Ren

OK. Well, let's give it back to him then. He must be missing it like crazy!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It is not common for a poweful person, nation or country to apologise to a weaker person, nation or country. Apology is only done among equals. China, Korea, Philipine and the rest, must first grow stronger economically, militarily, politicaly, and then they can ask for an apology. Nothing short of the above will get them any apology from Japan

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Mahumane-san, China CAN always ask for apology from Japan, as many times as they want to. They don't need to, they WANT TO, it's different, and even they know Japan wouldn't do it sincerely...Power talks and apologies over invasion follow two sets of logic and ethics...Kishida-sama actually has a "sortie" on the issue and it's simpler than what everybody thinks: get straight down to BUSINESS, give a co-development action plan of the area already- Chinese are reasonable businessmen, they surely will understand a banker's hint, if the offer is tempting enough...and everybody understands(without being able to say it out loud) that this is a long-standing complicated issue, unless Ryukyu or ROC comes back to live and get worldwide recognition, the only way out is to put politics aside and aim at a win-win economical gain.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

....individual Japanese citizens going to China to meet the people they imposed brutal conditions on, and apologizing. On U-tube, in front of the whole world. But, I guess that is not sincere.

A group of Japanese citizens paid respects to the victims of the Nanking massacre several weeks ago during the anniversary memorial. They were treated politely and warmly by local citizens. It's unfortunate that sincere apologies always become undone by right wing politicians who deny atrocities were committed.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Headline says........... " Ishida says he'll work to patch up relations with China "

In your dream.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I seriously doubt that any one person can convince China to give up their plans to take over all of the South and east China Seas.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

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