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S Korean president defends sex slave deal with Japan

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"she said, warning Japanese politicians and media against undermining the deal."

What Park means is that she has a huge uphill battle to overcome public opinion in South Korea that has been created by decades of anti-Japanese education in their school systems, so the last thing she needs any comments from loose lipped thoughtless Japanese politicians shooting off their personal views that would undernine her efforts. In this instance, since both South Korea and Japan have agreed that the issue has been permanently settled as "final and irreversible" I am sure the Abe administration has made this point very clear.

1 ( +10 / -9 )

Since Japan agreed to apologize and compensate these women, why do they demand the statues be removed AFTER the deal was agreed upon?

-3 ( +12 / -15 )

@WatchingStuff

"" why do they demand the statues be removed AFTER the deal was agreed upon?"

Because that was part of the original deal.

People assume that the apology/compensation deal was unconditional, but it wasn't, the conditions were that the deal would be final, irreversible, and that the SK govt would make a real effort to remove the statue from areas adjacent to the embassy.

Why? For you people who have no clue, International Diplomatic law - The receiving state is under a special duty to protect the mission premises from intrusion or damage or "impairment of its dignity".

2 ( +14 / -12 )

The hard line South Koreans opposed to this compromise are fools who should be shamed into silence rather than coddled.

3 ( +9 / -6 )

her gov't and previous gov'ts have had a huge hand in creating this anit-japanese sentiment. well guess what, the genie is out of the bottle, and you can't put her back in.

3 ( +11 / -8 )

@F4HA604

Where in the deal did South Korea agree to remove the statue?

2 ( +10 / -8 )

“We will not take the money,” said 90-year-old Kim Bok-Dong.

Fine. Don't take the money. Meanwhile, the rest of the world would like to move forward towards something more positive.

16 ( +20 / -4 )

"...a group of comfort women said the deal should be scrapped."

The question is: What do they want instead of an apology and compensation? I was under the impression that was what they had always demanded.

17 ( +18 / -1 )

What are the reasons for the still living comfort women to reject the apology/payment? What do they actually want? I was under the impression that a government sanctioned apology and remuneration is what they were after all along?

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Reality check: it takes two to tango. Sex slaves happen throughout history from Biblical and Islamic period till modern area. It is wrong. However, when there were pimps (DICTATORS, RULERS, GANGS...) there would be sex workers and clients. These elements combined commit crimes as an enterprise. It is time to stop exploitation on this issue and move on together by learning from all aspects of history, good and bad.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

OssanAmerica JAN. 14, 2016 - 07:18AM JST What Park means is that she has a huge uphill battle to overcome public opinion in South Korea that has been created by decades of anti-Japanese education in their school systems,

Are you sure? Your Japanese system has been creating young people who get annoyed by all the complaints that China and South Korea make about war atrocities because they are not taught what they are complaining about. The J-government deliberately tries not to teach young people the details of Japan's atrocities. If you experience history education in two countries, the way history is taught in Japan has at least one advantage, students come away with a comprehensive understanding of when events happened, in what order. At the age of 14, young Japanese students are clueless of Japan's relations with the outside world. They are taught too late. Young Japanese people often fail to understand why neighboring countries harbor a grudge over events that happened in 1931-45. The reason, in many cases, is that by the time they reach high school, they barely learned any 20th century history. Many young Japanese got a full picture when they left Japan and went to school in foreign countries. It's hardly surprising that some classes, in some schools, never get there, and are told by teachers to finish the book in their spare time.

Many young people in Japan really don't understand the Japan's war history and making the point that many of today's geopolitical tensions stem from what happened then. In Japanese textbook, only a footnote on the Nanjing massacre. Why they couldn't go straight to that period if it was so important, instead of wasting time on the other subject. When students did finally get there, it turned out only few pages dealt with events between 1931-45. Reading many factual books on the incident at least allowed them to understand why many people in China and South Korea still feel bitter about Japan's military past.

1 ( +10 / -9 )

sfjp330

Yes, Japanese are largely ignorant about how bad they were during WWII.

And South Koreans are full of rabid anti-Japanese propoganda.

Which do you think is more an obstacle?

0 ( +8 / -8 )

@Black Sabbath

South Korea no longer sees significant importance to Japan. So for South Korea, good relations with Japan is not a priority. The bilateral trade has reduced significantly. In the last ten years, Japan had more than fifty percent reduction in import/export from South Korea.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

South Korea no longer sees significant importance to Japan. So for South Korea, good relations with Japan is not a priority.

I hope you're right but SK is now desperately trying to get a currency SWAP deal with Japan. Why would Japan need SK's currency Won? Please ask your friend USA.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

these comfort women are now becoming very uncomforting. soon they will all be dead but i"ll bet all that japanese compensation money that we will still be able to hear them complain.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Your Japanese system has been creating young people who get annoyed by all the complaints that China and South Korea make about war atrocities because they are not taught what they are complaining about.

No, they are annoyed because China and South Korea are complaining about something that happened 70 years ago, and has nothing to do with them. And they are the only people constantly on the receiving end of such complaints, despite atrocities committed by basically every country back then, or even since then.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

WatchingStuffJAN. 14, 2016 - 10:04AM JST

@F4HA604

Where in the deal did South Korea agree to remove the statue?

Here is a Korean news report. http://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/news/article/Article.aspx?aid=3013314

“The Korean government acknowledged the Japanese government’s concerns over the statute for the security of the embassy,” Yun said. “The Korean government will try to find an appropriate resolution by consulting with concerned civic groups.”

In case you do not believe in Korean news, here is the original news release by the South Korean Foreign Department.

http://www.mofa.go.kr/news/focus/index.jsp?mofat=001&menu=m_20_50

한국 정부는 일본 정부가 주한일본대사관 앞의 소녀상에 대해 공관의 안녕·위엄의 유지라는 관점에서 우려하고 있는 점을 인지하고, 한국 정부로서도 가능한 대응방향에 대해 관련단체와의 협의 등을 통해 적절히 해결되도록 노력함.

(translation) Recognizing that the Japanese Government is concerned about the statue of a girl in front of the Japanese Embassy in Korea in terms of safety and dignity of the diplomatic mission, Korean Government also will strive to appropriately solve it, in possibly accommodating way, though, for example, discussion with the concerned body.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

therougou JAN. 14, 2016 - 02:47PM JST No, they are annoyed because China and South Korea are complaining about something that happened 70 years ago, and has nothing to do with them. And they are the only people constantly on the receiving end of such complaints, despite atrocities committed by basically every country back then, or even since then.

Do you see German Chancellor and 100 of their top government reps visiting the Nazi grave? In a wording and verbal openings on diplomatic meets, Japanese officials delivered apologies, but there were never formal documentation of apology with promises to fix their mistakes by taking such actions and such. The Japanese apologies were always vague and lacked details, other than saying sorry and we'll never do it. In meantime in Japan, over 100 Japanese politicians keeps going to Yasukuni and worship their old war criminals as gods and glorify the old days by adding easily accepted forms such as textbooks, popular magazine and newspaper articles and suggesting Japanese legitimacy on their position in WWII. Then someday, we'll come across generation of Japanese population that really believes that their course of action in WWII was the right thing and wanting retribution. The young Japanese students are clueless of Japan's relations with the outside world. With Abe's administration Japan things really started to look that way.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

Where in the deal did South Korea agree to remove the statue?

Here is a Korean news report. http://koreajoongangdaily.joins.com/news/article/Article.aspx?aid=3013314

“The Korean government acknowledged the Japanese government’s concerns over the statute for the security of the embassy,” Yun said. “The Korean government will try to find an appropriate resolution by consulting with concerned civic groups.”

Interesting that you would post something that proves they didn't agree to remove the statue. You do realized you proved yourself wrong, right?

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

This is becoming ridiculous and useless! So many apologies, and compensation paid for a third time!! It's never good enough or appreciated! Does more harm then good! We are giving apologies for what happened 70 years ago during your great grandfather's time!! Want to fix the comfort woman problem? Just wait until North attacks again or China becomes aggressive towards South. One day we will get dragged in a major war because of North and South. We should take advantage and wait!! Let Korea come begging to help defend against North or to help reunite that country! Patience Japan!! Let's see which country needs who more!!

6 ( +8 / -2 )

StrangerlandJAN. 14, 2016 - 03:45PM JST

My comment is for WatchingStuff.

WatchingStuffJAN. 14, 2016 - 08:16AM JST

Since Japan agreed to apologize and compensate these women, why do they demand the statues be removed AFTER the deal was agreed upon?

WatchingStuffJAN. 14, 2016 - 10:04AM JST

Where in the deal did South Korea agree to remove the statue?

I think my previous comment perfectly answers WatchingStuff's question.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

But at a weekly protest in front of the Japanese embassy in Seoul on Wednesday, a group of comfort women said the deal should be scrapped.

“We will not take the money,” said 90-year-old Kim Bok-Dong.

So an apology and money aren't enough... what the heck to they want? Blood?

3 ( +5 / -2 )

F4HA604:

Because that was part of the original deal.

No it wasn't.

CH3CHO:

Thanks. As Strangerland noted, your info proves there was no promise to remove the statue. Why do people persist in claiming that there was?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

My comment is for WatchingStuff.

It doesn't change the fact that you posted a quote that proved you were wrong about the Koreans agreeing to remove the statue.

Where in the deal did South Korea agree to remove the statue?

I think my previous comment perfectly answers WatchingStuff's question.

Except that your previous comment showed very clearly that they did not agree to remove the statue.

As Strangerland noted, your info proves there was no promise to remove the statue. Why do people persist in claiming that there was?

C3PO keeps repeating it, after being showed that he is wrong, and he even posts the text that shows he is wrong.

Kind of calls into question anything else he believes as well.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

your info proves there was no promise to remove the statue. Why do people persist in claiming that there was?

because you don't know the bigger picture of the agreement. There were lots of talks about the statue up to the Ministerial meeting, with which you have to see the agreement. SK knows that statue removal is a must.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

SK knows that statue removal is a must.

Speculation. On the other hand, we know exactly what was agreed to publicly by both sides. No need to speculate.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Strangerland JAN. 14, 2016 - 05:55PM JSTIt doesn't change the fact that you posted a quote that proved you were wrong about the Koreans agreeing to remove the statue.

U.S. officials believe the statue’s removal is not a condition for the Japanese aid but they expect the relocation to happen eventually.

Source: New York Times

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

U.S. officials believe the statue’s removal is not a condition for the Japanese aid but they expect the relocation to happen eventually.

What's it got to do with America?

The SK government agreed to look into the possibilities of removing or relocating the statue - to most people that's as good as saying they'll have it moved. It's a way of copping out if you can't get something done, but the wording does suggest that they'll look into it. Personally they should move it... it serves no purpose other than to pee the Japanese off... unless that's the intention? For this agreement to work and for Park to have a legacy she'll need to do as the Japanese ask... if it fails it's down to her being bloody minded.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I think the best thing for Korea to do would be to move the statue after payment has been made. But not as a requirement of the deal, rather as an expression of good faith on having moved forward. Whether that would/will happen, I don't know, I could see it going either way. But the point is that this was not part of the agreement that Japan agreed to.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Well, I think it would be the best interest for SK to remove the statue. I don't care if they won't, they just invite more anger from Japan.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

The SK government agreed to look into the possibilities of removing or relocating the statue - to most people that's as good as saying they'll have it moved.

No it's not. Agreements are quite specific for a reason. If Japan wanted to believe this meant that it would be moved for sure, then they made a major mistake in not clarifying this.

if it fails it's down to her being bloody minded.

No, if it fails, it's down to the Japanese reneging after they agreed to the original agreement. That's their fault, not the Koreans.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

it is only the best that SK can do especially since the current PM is involved since the father who was PM for SK at the time did not give the money paid by Japan to the intended people and spent it else where. Yet we the Japanese have to pay this money again, it is no big secret that the women do not want the money since it was their own gov that did them wrong from the start by not giving them the money they were to receive along time ago and a lot more than this amount agreed to recently.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

It's like when the US and Iran signed their nuclear deal - they have to sell it to their people.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Thunderbird2 JAN. 14, 2016 - 06:18PM JST What's it got to do with America?

Alot. It reflected a deep U.S. investment in a diplomatic deal it worked to cultivate and is working to safeguard as it comes under fire in both countries. Obama raised the issue in nearly every meeting he’s had with the leaders of Japan and South Korea over the last several years. Repairing the Japan-South Korea relationship was essential to U.S. for two reasons. A closer alliance between the two could help counterbalance China’s growing military and economic influence in the region, and help keep North Korean aggression in check.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

A closer alliance between the two could help counterbalance China’s growing military and economic influence in the region, and help keep North Korean aggression in check.

You would think these would be motivations for Japan and S. Korea as well, and not just the Americans.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

StrangerlandJAN. 14, 2016 - 06:34PM JST

A closer alliance between the two could help counterbalance China’s growing military and economic influence in the region, and help keep North Korean aggression in check.

You would think these would be motivations for Japan and S. Korea as well, and not just the Americans.

If China confronts the US, South Korea will be on China's side.

http://www.voanews.com/content/south-korean-president-china-diplomacy/2943637.html

StrangerlandJAN. 14, 2016 - 05:55PM JST

Except that your previous comment showed very clearly that they did not agree to remove the statue.

South Korea recognized the concerns of Japanese Embassy and pledged to try to solve the concerns appropriately. So, it must try to do so. And it can do so very easily by removing or relocating the statue, or else it must propose a better solution if there is. If X promised to try to solve Y, and if X can easily solve Y by doing Z where other options are unlikely, X must do Z.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

South Korea recognized the concerns of Japanese Embassy and pledged to try to solve the concerns appropriately.

Finally you get it right. They pledged to try, not that they would get it done for sure.

And it can do so very easily by removing or relocating the statue

If they want to remain a democratic nation, it's not as easy as you want to think due to the fact that it was put up by civilians.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

sfjp330Jan. 14, 2016 - 10:29AM JST OssanAmerica JAN. 14, 2016 - 07:18AM JST What Park means is that she has a huge uphill battle to overcome public >opinion in South Korea that has been created by decades of anti-Japanese education in their school systems,

Are you sure? Your Japanese system

Sorry but it's not MY Japanese System. 70% of South Korean textbooks are biased against Japan and designed to instill and hatred, disregarding any benefits gained from Japan. This was determined by the PARK ADMINISTRATION which is now attempting to remove these textbooks and replace them with objective ones. Best to actually study what is going on I South Korea today before repeating the old well worn "Japanese textbooks" fallacy,

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Regardless how SK managed to beg Japan to announce it as the utmost effort (which is their favorite tactics by the way), the statue is to be removed simply because it violates Vienna convention Art.22. Japan has been requesting, which means Japan thinks disturbance of the peace of the mission or impairment of its dignity exit. It’s just simple as that.

Also It’s the symbolic message that the issue is not solved finally and irreversibly.

Until the statue is removed, no more rally nor assembly should be allowed as those must have been basically prohibited within 100m radius of foreign embassy.

Of course, the government can remove the statue erected on public road right away at it’s sole discretion if it gets serious. Remember 2002, US Armored vehicle run over and killed two girls, the government did not let civilian group to erect memorial statue near US embassy? The group erected the memorial far away from the embassy but the government still took it down. It’s just making excuse for hiding the back of civilians.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

the statue is to be removed simply because it violates Vienna convention Art.22.

No it doesn't. Japan's dignity is harmed by it's denial of it's atrocities, not by Korea's pointing them out.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

That's what you and Koreans and any others think, not Japan and Japanese emabssy. It is just simple as that

1 ( +3 / -2 )

It sure is as simple as that. Which is why the statue is still there - because it's there legally. Too bad for Japan.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

No it is not legal. Prove it otherwise

1 ( +3 / -2 )

S Korean president defends sex slave deal with Japan

OK, THIS headline has to be one of the most easily misinterpreted statements there is. It's SHAMEFUL that the the S.K. President is a dealer in sex slaves! LOL

@DieRealityCheck

No it is not legal. Prove it otherwise

Apparently the owner of the land the statue is on wants the statue there. The country would have to take the owner to court in order to force something on privately owned property to be removed to another location. "Eminent Domain" (if it is even a legal concept in South Korea) generally doesn't apply if the government can't prove that the taking of the land is for public use.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

@sfjp330

Do you see German Chancellor and 100 of their top government reps visiting the Nazi grave? In a wording and verbal openings on diplomatic meets, Japanese officials delivered apologies, but there were never formal documentation of apology with promises to fix their mistakes by taking such actions and such. The Japanese apologies were always vague and lacked details, other than saying sorry and we'll never do it. In meantime in Japan, over 100 Japanese politicians keeps going to Yasukuni and worship their old war criminals as gods and glorify the old days by adding easily accepted forms such as textbooks, popular magazine and newspaper articles and suggesting Japanese legitimacy on their position in WWII. Then someday, we'll come across generation of Japanese population that really believes that their course of action in WWII was the right thing and wanting retribution. The young Japanese students are clueless of Japan's relations with the outside world. With Abe's administration Japan things really started to look that way.

You can insert your cookie-cutter lines wherever you want, but it still won't show that the "Japanese system has been creating young people who get annoyed by all the complaints that China and South Korea make about war atrocities because they are not taught what they are complaining about." I am not from the Japanese system but I am quite annoyed by complaints from China and South Korea as well. In fact, I'd say more annoyed than most Japanese, who are usually calm and rarely go out of their way to comment on such issues. Maybe you were offended by a few net warriors at some point in your life, but you are really out of touch with reality if you think what you wrote is true.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Did somebody buy the space on the pavement (public) from City of Seoul?

My understanding is that City of Seoul has still not issued offcial permission yet despite whatever they say positive things in public.

Even if City of Seoul issues offcial permission, it goes against Korean criminal Law 185.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

No it is not legal. Prove it otherwise

That's not how law works. Something is legal by default. It can then be shown to be illegal if it contravenes a law - which in this case it doesn't.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

It can then be shown to be illegal if it contravenes a law - which in this case it doesn't.

Fine. It is illegal.

It is an illegal erection on public land (road)

It is against

1)Vienna Convention Art.22 2

2)Korean criminal Law 185

If any rally, demonstrations around the staue, it is against

3)General Aeembly and Demonstation Law Art.11

And you are saying...?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

sfjp330

South Korea no longer sees significant importance to Japan. So for South Korea, good relations with Japan is not a priority.

I wonder whatever gave you that idea? The very article is about ROK/Japan reapproachment.

Finally, ROK is a client state of the US. The US wants Japan and ROK to make nicey-nice.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Now Fadamor, interesting choice of words, by insinuating 'government' collusion in the recruitment process, hitherto only senior members of the imperial Japanese military were involved, gives rise to the accusation that the present government of Japan could be held legally responsible with all the financial and political ramifications.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Maybe the Sorks had their fingers crossed behind their backs when they said they'd move the statue. That would be pretty typical of the South Korean politicians. Babies.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The Comfort Women "Deal" is supposed to be irrevocable, presumably that means no backtracking or deviation from its original wording by the administration; but it didn't take the LDP long to re-start its old game -- an endless cycle of first apologizing for the sex slavery, then a member of the party says they were voluntary prostitutes, followed by official criticism and backtracking, only to have somebody else start it all over again some time later, ad nauseam, as evidenced in this article:

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/01/14/national/politics-diplomacy/ldp-lawmaker-retracts-statement-comfort-women-prostitutes/#.VpgWxrYrJ1s

And if the sight of the Comfort Girl statue is so injurious to Japan's history-beautification effort, perhaps the Koreans could help out by hiding it from open view -- by building a museum around it.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

greed - leading to the path of unhappiness

0 ( +1 / -1 )

CH3CHO

Nowhere in your post does it state that the Korean government agreed to remove the statue. In fact, a South Korean minister told the press that they never made such a promise.

Why is Japan being so dishonest here? The statue stays whether they like it or not.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

"The Japanese and South Korean foreign ministers, announcing the agreement in Seoul, said each side considered it a “final and irreversible resolution” of the issue."

This means exactly what is says. Keeping a hate monument in front of the embassy is not in keeping with the spirit of this agreement.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

@ OssanAmerica

A statue of a rape victim is not a hate monument. The deal is irreversible. Japan is breaking code by demanding the statues be removed after the deal was already agreed upon. The Korean government has gone out and stated that no such demand was made.

@ DieRealityCheck

The previous article we were debating on expired. I can't add new comments to it. Want to continue to discussion on reddit?

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

WatchingStuffJAN. 15, 2016 - 07:53AM JST

In fact, a South Korean minister told the press that they never made such a promise.

Why is Japan being so dishonest here?

I think you need to check the meaning of "honest".

http://www.mofa.go.kr/webmodule/htsboard/template/read/korboardread.jsp?typeID=9&boardid=749&seqno=302418&c=&t=&pagenum=1&tableName=TYPE_SPEECH&pc=&dc=&wc=&lu=&vu=&iu=&du=

한국 정부는 일본 정부가 주한일본대사관 앞의 소녀상에 대해 공관의 안녕·위엄의 유지라는 관점에서 우려하고 있는 점을 인지하고, 한국 정부로서도 가능한 대응방향에 대해 관련단체와의 협의 등을 통해 적절히 해결되도록 노력함.

(translation) Recognizing that the Japanese Government is concerned about the statue of a girl in front of the Japanese Embassy in Korea in terms of safety and dignity of the diplomatic mission, Korean Government also will strive to appropriately solve it, in possibly accommodating way, through, for example, discussion with the concerned body.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

WatchingStuffJan. 15, 2016 - 08:05AM JST @ OssanAmerica A statue of a rape victim is not a hate monument.

The comfort Women were paid Military Prostitutes, as stated in the US Army Report No.49. It is a hate monument designed to keep the issue akive,m despite the South Korean governents declaration that the issue is finalized and irreversible.

The deal is irreversible. Japan is breaking code by demanding the statues be removed after the deal was already >agreed >upon. The Korean government has gone out and stated that no such demand was made

Wring again. South Korea agreed to work on removing the monument. That is the agreement.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

South Korea agreed to work on removing the monument.

Exactly. They agreed to work on removing it. If they had agreed to simply remove the statue right away, I'm sure they could easily do that. But that is not what was agreed. I expect they will eventually persuade whoever needs to be persuaded, and the statue will be removed. But that is outside the agreement and is a domestic Korean matter now.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Wring again. South Korea agreed to work on removing the monument. That is the agreement.

They agreed to try:

They agreed to work on removing it. If they had agreed to simply remove the statue right away, I'm sure they could easily do that. But that is not what was agreed. I expect they will eventually persuade whoever needs to be persuaded, and the statue will be removed. But that is outside the agreement and is a domestic Korean matter now.

Exactly.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

What do they want instead of an apology and compensation?

Because soon after the deal was signed, Mr Abe went to Yasukuni shrine. Just the other day, Sakurada said the sex slaves were prostitutes. Such actions cast Japan's sincerity in a very poor light. Hence their reluctance to accept the apology and compensation

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

CH3CHO

You still haven't been able to show or prove that Korea agreed to remove the statue. Just admit that you're wrong and that Korea never made such a promise.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

If South Korea refuses to move the hate monument, then they have negotiated in bad faith. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out that keeping the monument in place runs counter to "resolving the issue permanently and irreversibly". The South Korean government, not being idiots, stated that they recognized this and would work on moving it. Whether the wife of the J-PM who holds no public office goes to Yasukuni or some J-politician called the Comfort Women prostitutes, which is exactly what the US Army called them, is utterly irrelevant to the issue. South Korea and Japan have made a major step forward the mutual benefit of both countries, and the hate mongers who linger here trying desperately to keep the hate alive need to get a real life,

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Why should Korea remove the statue when it made no promises to do so? Quit trying to shift the goal post.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Mr Abe went to Yasukuni shrine

Typing error, Mrs Abe went to Yasukuni, after the deal was signed

If South Korea refuses to move the hate monument, then they have negotiated in bad faith

No, they haven't

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Why should Korea remove the statue when it made no promises to do so?

Putting your sophistry aside, the reason is because it is illegal as DieRealityCheck highlighted at Jan.15, 2016 - 01:15AM JST. ROK gov should have removed the statue right when it was built on the public street by civilians without official permit, however, ROK gov had been ignoring to this date unlike the case of Yangju highway incident.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

ROK gov should have removed the statue right when it was built on the public street by civilians without official permit, however, ROK gov had been ignoring to this date unlike the case of Yangju highway incident.

Nope

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

If the statue is on public property, then the city has the authority to relocate it wherever they want. If the creators of the statue don't want to have the statue confiscated, they will move it on their own. I'm not really sure how civilians can guarantee that the statue won't move if it's on city property.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Park is already under fire for accepting a very watered-down - and to be honest, insecure - deal with Japan. If she made any attempt to move the statue she'd be thrown to the wolves. Besides, the statue was privately erected

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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