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S Korean president urges Japan to apologise to 'comfort women'

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They still talking about it?

7 ( +25 / -17 )

Perhaps Ms. Park could give back the money her father received as president of South Korea for the women in its treaty with Japan while she is on the subject.

9 ( +28 / -19 )

They still talking about it?

Why wouldn't they be? Japan has done nothing to resolve the situation.

-5 ( +22 / -28 )

"The stupid neither forgive nor forget; the naive forgive and forget; the wise forgive but do not forget." Thomas S. Szasz (Hungarian psychiatrist).

21 ( +25 / -4 )

Time for Japan to stop just thinking 'again' and look into their own history to see why so many people are still hurting from their war antics. Ignore it at Japan and look worse and worse in the eyes of the world.

-5 ( +17 / -23 )

I suspect, unfortunately, that it may only be the passage of time that will "settle" this issue. Clearly neither side has shown any willingness to truly resolve this, only play to their respective domestic constituencies.

Japan, for its part, looks set to only harden its position. The controversy over the Asahi Shimbun's comfort women reporting has only renewed the resolve of the conservatives to recast the history regarding comfort women. The idea that Japan, under Abe's government, will issue a genuine apology to the comfort women is a distant possibility. Does anyone really think PM Abe will do that, given his family history? If anything, he will backtrack on what has already been said.

Korea, for its part, is conveniently ignoring the payments it received from Japan as part of the 1965 Treaty which were supposed to settle all claims. Setting aside the question of a specific apology to the comfort women, they themselves argued that the monies to settle claims would be paid by Japan to the Korean government and the Korean government would compensate the individuals directly. Which never happened, of course. However, that is an inconvenient truth for the Korean government, particularly for this President, given that her father was the President at the time.

This year marks 50 years since the treaty between the two countries and 70 years since the end of the war. Maybe in another 50 years, after most of us are dead and gone, others will not still be having this same conversation. One can only hope.

7 ( +13 / -6 )

Korean politicians like President Park politicize comfort women to bolster support at home. On the other hand Japanese politicians continue to skirt the issue because they would lose support by accepting Korea's demand for an apology. End result: nothing will change.

14 ( +17 / -3 )

This is obviously a quick and easy way for Park to boost approval ratings at home, and divert public attention from issues that matter — all at the expense of more healthy bilateral relations. She is even worse than Abe.

Her call for an apology would have more significantly more credence if she would first apologize for South Korea's atrocities in Vietnam (the Binh An massacre, Binh Hoa massacre, Binh Tai massacre, etc.), and apologize for the role of her father and other South Koreans who were in cahoots with the IJA during the war.

0 ( +12 / -12 )

I don't understand why the Korean president demands apology from Japan so obstinately about the thing which happened nearly 100 years ago. It is not that we do not apologize for what we did in the past but we are apologizing every year. Suppose my grandfather was nasty to his neighbor and if the neighbor demands apology for what my grandfather did, I would be very much perplexed. President Park is paranoiac. America dropped two atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki and America never apologized to Japan about it claiming it was necessary to put an end to the war soon. Most Japanese do not agree to their cause but think what is the use of arguing the issue. What had happened is happened. Important thing is in the future.

2 ( +16 / -13 )

I don't understand why the Korean president demands apology from Japan so obstinately about the thing which happened nearly 100 years ago.

1) For the women who are still alive, the fact that it was 70 years ago doesn't matter. They are still living with the memories - and no official apology.

2) Many Japanese right-wingers, including politicians and the Prime Minister himself, deny that they were sex slaves, and are claiming that they were voluntary prostitutes.

As such, it's not an old issue, it's still very current.

-3 ( +16 / -20 )

He already has freaken apologized. Man these people don't learn.

8 ( +20 / -12 )

What had happened is happened. Important thing is in the future.

The governments of both Japan and South Korea are to blame here, both are dredging up the past to gain political advantage at home.

The Abe regime and Japan's right wingers are to blame for publicly denying/whitewashing past wrongdoings, thereby negating past apologies and fueling anger around the world. The Park regime is to blame for using the comfort women issue to her political advantage, while turning a blind eye to Korea's role in atrocities.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

He already has freaken apologized. Man these people don't learn.

Who is he? I hope you don't mean Abe: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/1544471/Japanese-PM-denies-wartime-comfort-women-were-forced.html

6 ( +12 / -7 )

The important thing is that the remaining survivors know they were sex slaves, and that is what really counts, so apologize to them already and move on before they are all dead.

7 ( +12 / -6 )

This type of news gives me a headache. It's like my friend is still angry about what happened a long time ago, which I thought I had already apologized for. In such case, I just assume that this friend may have some issue on his/her own, and I may not have much to do with that.

2 ( +10 / -7 )

Japan just needs to grow a pair and stop this bull-crap once and for all.

None of the former colonial powers has to apologise everyday.

Japan should just expel of these Koreans to Korea; alternatively send them all to Canada.

-5 ( +11 / -15 )

It's like my friend is still angry about what happened a long time ago, which I thought I had already apologized for.

Incorrect. For your analogy to be accurate, it's like your friend is angry, because after you apologized to someone else instead of him directly, you then told even another person that actually you weren't sorry at all because you didn't do anything wrong.

7 ( +14 / -8 )

If they are demonstrating against former Japanese rule, they can also use their chance to demonstrate against former Chinese rule under the Ming and Qing eras? It's clearly that South Korea don't want a peacefully end of the issue between Japan when they're just enriches their minds to critisize Japan and not China as well?

-2 ( +8 / -9 )

What incentive is Ms. Park willing to offer Japan for its apologizing, aside from her next round of demands for more apologies?

0 ( +8 / -8 )

It seems to be a history that Japan officially compensated and apologized properly in 1965 to normalize the relations of the two countries and South Korea accepted no more future demands from Japan on the treaty at that time.

1 ( +8 / -6 )

Cortes ElijahMAR. 02, 2015 - 08:57AM JST He already has freaken apologized. Man these people don't learn.

Cold. Heart. What you're basically saying is "shut the hell up old women, so what if you were gang raped 10 times for years from the age of 11. Life's like that and we don't give a shit. We gave you your stupid damn apology (even though we keep demonstrating clearly didn't mean it) and some cash (oh wait that was a private organisation not Japan as a nation). Now hurry up and die already, I got my own selfish, heartless life to lead".

I know some people just don't have a warm beating heart period, but come on, not you Elijah.

0 ( +10 / -11 )

Cortes ElijahMAR. 02, 2015 - 08:57AM JST He already has freaken apologized. Man these people don't learn.

Cold. Heart. What you're basically saying is "shut the hell up old women, so what if you were gang raped 10 times for years from the age of 11. Life's like that and we don't give a shit. We gave you your stupid damn apology (even though we keep demonstrating clearly didn't mean it) and some cash (oh wait that was a private organisation not Japan as a nation). Now hurry up and die already, I got my own selfish, heartless life to lead".

I know some people just don't have a warm beating heart period, but come on, not you Elijah.

-1 ( +8 / -10 )

I dislike Abe's position on this issue, but the Japanese government has apologized several times; so if Korea refuses to accept it, it will be harder for any Japanese politician to convince the Japanese public they need to bow their heads again.

When Korea and Japan normalized relations, Japan paid a large sum of money, and it was the Korean government who insisted they will pass it on to victims. The Kono statement of 1993 (as the article mentions). Japan has offered compensation through the Asian Women's Fund. Prime Minister Koizumi has written a letter of apology directly to former comfort women:

Letter from Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi to the former comfort women

The Year of 2001

Dear Madam,

On the occasion that the Asian Women's Fund, in cooperation with the Government and the people of Japan, offers atonement from the Japanese people to the former wartime comfort women, I wish to express my feelings as well.

The issue of comfort women, with an involvement of the Japanese military authorities at that time, was a grave affront to the honor and dignity of large numbers of women.

As Prime Minister of Japan, I thus extend anew my most sincere apologies and remorse to all the women who underwent immeasurable and painful experiences and suffered incurable physical and psychological wounds as comfort women.

We must not evade the weight of the past, nor should we evade our responsibilities for the future.

I believe that our country, painfully aware of its moral responsibilities, with feelings of apology and remorse, should face up squarely to its past history and accurately convey it to future generations.

Furthermore, Japan also should take an active part in dealing with violence and other forms of injustice to the honor and dignity of women.

Finally, I pray from the bottom of my heart that each of you will find peace for the rest of your lives.

Respectfully yours,

Junichiro Koizumi Prime Minister of Japan

4 ( +12 / -7 )

demanding an apology rarely results in an apology, especially when it involves international relations. japan will never budge on this issue when it's being demanded by other countries. onyl domestic pressure will have any attempts at success. even sympathetic japanese are sick of hearing about this issue from SK and china.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

How many times should they re-apologoze?

January 1, 1992: Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa, in a press conference, said: "Concerning the comfort women, I apologize from the bottom of my heart and feel remorse for those people who suffered indescribable hardships".

January 17, 1992: Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa, at a policy speech on a visit to South Korea, said:. "What we should not forget about relationship between our nation and your nation is a fact that there was a certain period in the thousands of years of our company when we were the victimizer and you were the victim. I would like to once again express a heartfelt remorse and apology for the unbearable suffering and sorrow that you experienced during this period because of our nation's act." Recently the issue of the so-called 'wartime comfort women' is being brought up. I think that incidents like this are seriously heartbreaking, and I am truly sorry"

Upon further research, there was even a fund established for them called the The Asian Women's Fund (アジア女性基金) Does this woman even know how to research? She should apologize to the comfort women since she is obviously only using them as a tool to try to make Japan apologize. Disgusting.

-3 ( +5 / -7 )

I dislike Abe's position on this issue, but the Japanese government has apologized several times

You call this an apology:

"There was no evidence to prove there was coercion as initially suggested. That largely changes what constitutes the definition of coercion, and we have to take it from there," - Prime Minister Shinzo Abe

5 ( +13 / -9 )

Japan, there are 111 news articles about this around the world right now. Ignore this and the country I love's international image is going to continue its decline.

https://news.google.com/news/story?ncl=dL97j30flPya0QMbnW0qqKwm3jjlM&q=japan&lr=English&hl=en&sa=X&ei=4a_zVOTvNMHQmAXYz4DIBQ&ved=0CCsQqgIwAA

1 ( +8 / -8 )

@ Strangerland

As I said, I don't like Abe's position, but previous Japanese governments have apologized. Better read the whole post before commenting.

-3 ( +8 / -10 )

As I said, I don't like Abe's position, but previous Japanese governments have apologized. Better read the whole post before commenting.

And current politicians have denied. It ends up canceling out the apologies, particularly when the current sitting PM feels that way.

On top of this, there has never been an official apology ratified by the cabinet. Until that happens, it cannot be considered to be a proper apology.

Better read the whole post before commenting.

And you'd be better to know all the facts before commenting.

7 ( +14 / -8 )

And current politicians have denied. It ends up canceling out the apologies, particularly when the current sitting PM feels that way.

Maybe it cancels it out, maybe not. I tend to agree with you, but that is an interpretation.

On top of this, there has never been an official apology ratified by the cabinet. Until that happens, it cannot be considered to be a proper apology.

The Kono statement and Koizumi's apologies were stated as prime ministers and are official apologies. Apologies are not "ratified" by parliament. As we speak, the Kono statement is still the official position of the government, and is on the official MOFA's official website (although that might change this year).

1 ( +7 / -6 )

My godness. Again? Every week is the same think. The same tiring "oh, japan must apologize". I think it is a kind of mental problem.

-3 ( +10 / -12 )

Strangerland

It seems that South Korea still forgets about an international big issue that its soldiers raped and killed so many Vietnamese civilian people during Vietnam war and never heard about any apology and compensation to Vietnam so far. I just wonder why no apology for them?

2 ( +10 / -7 )

I suspect there is a language translation issue here. In Asian languages like Japanese and Korean and Chinese it is not possible to say "an apology" as there are no indefinite or definite articles in those languages. Surely what Park saying is that Abe should "offer apology". This seems a reasonable request in response to Abe's repeated statements that there was no forced abuse of comfort women, and that Japanese soldiers who served in Korea should be venerated. Of course, both Park and Abe are operating within the contexts of their respective domestic opinions, but logic and the norms of international diplomacy say that the country which was the aggressor needs always to be on the front foot with its statements or remorse and regret, and unfortunately, Abe doesn't really position himself in this way.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Send AKB over there. That'll make everyone happy happy.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

When are the surviving old South Korean men who served in the Imperial Japanese milirary diring WWII and made use of the Comfort Stations and their decendants going to apologize to the former Comfort Women?

-7 ( +8 / -14 )

Any chance of her acknowledging the reparations paid by Japan to Korea already? She loves to conveniently ignore that happened.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

It seems that South Korea still forgets about an international big issue that its soldiers raped and killed so many Vietnamese civilian people during Vietnam war and never heard about any apology and compensation to Vietnam so far. I just wonder why no apology for them?

how does this excuse Japan from needing to apologize?

2 ( +8 / -7 )

I read this article, but I didn't have to. There's nothing new.

Japan - Stop denying it. Embrace it and swallow your pride. You already made an official apology with reparations that was accepted in the past. Korea has no right to demand further action, but they do have a right to demand that you don't deny or diminish past wrongs.

Korea - Let it go. Nothing can be done to change the past. Keep this to what it is, an intellectual and historical debate. Stop using it as political propaganda.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

And here we all go back down into the rabbit hole....again. It all feels like the Abbott & Costello "Who's On First" routine.

Look, Park is a conservative nationalist, Abe is a conservative nationalist. Park is playing to her support base, which loves this stuff and tends to ignore inconvenient details. Abe is absolutely playing to his base as well, who have a revisionist view of history.

Japan has paid reparations at the time of the signing of the Treaty of '65, which officially close out all claims for compensation from Korea. The Asia Comfort Women's Fund was a way around that, since officially there was no basis to pay any further claims. In addition, there are the numerous apologies/expressions of regret previously provided, all of which Park conveniently ignores when demanding further apologies.

At the same time, Abe has only himself to blame for helping inflame the situation by denying any coercion back in 2007, by now deciding to review the previous statements and facts around this issue, and by openly saying that the texts of some U.S. textbooks regarding this issue need to be revised. It certainly does not seem like he is supportive of the previous apologies around this issue.

So, there you go. There is obviously more facts that can be brought to bear on either side, but at this point, I don't think either leader really wants to settle this, or at least not do so in a way that would cause domestic problems for themselves.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

how does this excuse Japan from needing to apologize?

Not making any excuses for Japan. Why doesn't S Korea simply apologize Vietnam for many decades?

-5 ( +5 / -9 )

"Because unlike your magical thinking most never got any chance to sleep with anyone while fighting"

Did ALL Japanese soldiers managed to get one leg up?

Didn't they have to do some fighting as well?

Going by that logic shouldn't they be excused from the all encompassing "Japanese soldiers" getting their rocks off on the unsuspecting Korean lasses?

2 ( +6 / -4 )

kwattMAR. 02, 2015 - 10:25AM JST how does this excuse Japan from needing to apologize?

Not making any excuses for Japan. Why doesn't S Korea simply apologize Vietnam for many decades?

Can we stop with the childlike logic; when someone commits a crime can we let them off because the police officer arresting them smoked pot in his youth. Silliness.

Nobody has EVER suggested Japan is the ONLY country to have harmed another countries people. Just because Korea harmed Vietnamese doesn't exonerate Japan from harming Koreans.

0 ( +5 / -6 )

Why doesn't S Korea simply apologize Vietnam for many decades?

What does that have to do with Japan apologize for its wrongs?

4 ( +10 / -7 )

strangerland

It seems that Japan has actually apologized times but South Korea never done any inches for wrongs.

-3 ( +7 / -9 )

"What does that have to do with Japan apologize for its wrongs?"

Is it because Korea's been highly hypocritical here?

1 ( +10 / -9 )

President Park? please, perhaps she needs to research her father who took part in receiving the money compensated and more than likely she enjoyed living in luxury on that very same money. Make her own crooked thugs pay the ones who didn't receive the money leave Japan out of it.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

@letsberealistic

Can we stop with the childlike logic; when someone commits a crime can we let them off because the police officer arresting them smoked pot in his youth. Silliness.

But it was neither Abe nor the current government which committed this crime.

Using that childlike logic, Korea wants Japan to apologize because Japan's father smoked pot when it was younger. (Note that the current Japan has got nothing to do with this.)

A former PM has already apologized and The Asian Women's Fund was established as well. Do they want every government to apologize from now on?

Nobody has EVER suggested Japan is the ONLY country to have harmed another countries people. Just because Korea harmed Vietnamese doesn't exonerate Japan from harming Koreans.

kwatt actually meant that Korea's behavior of demanding apologies is hypocrisy. They don't apologize for what they did in the past, but demand that Japan does so. While Japan has apologized in the past, Korea has not. In fact, in 2014, Vietnam had to ask Korea to CANCEL VIETNAM WAR CELEBRATIONS.

Think about that for a second. Why should anyone apologize for war crimes a third time to people who still celebrate their own war crimes? It's odd.

The worst thing is that it's not even about the comfort women anymore. It's just propaganda at this point.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

This is Double Jeopardy, Japan already paid, end of story. In fact, anyone who reads the "Treaty on Basic Relations between Japan and the Republic of Korea" knows that Japan proposed to directly compensate individual victims but ROK refuse and to take it all on behalf of it's victims. But ROK didn't gave it to the victims, did it? NO, it instead use it for economic development. The victims should really blame and demand it from the Korean Govt. but it can't do that, because then it cannot blame Japan anymore to divert anger and attention from it's own problems.

In 1994, Japanese Govt. even established the Asian Women's Fund to distribute compensation to former comfort women from various nations. Each survivor received a signed apology from the then Prime Minister of Japan. The funds were provided from both the state and donations from the public. it was dissolved in 2007.

While South Korea rejected it since it was not a state redress, but why should it, since a formal apology and compensaton were already solved with the nations affected, including South Korea. this was in addition.

South Korea already been compensated, formal apology already been given, yet despite that, it still demands it every year. Enough is Enough.

4 ( +10 / -6 )

I don't understand why the Korean president demands apology from Japan so obstinately about the thing which happened nearly 100 years ago.

This article is crap because it doesn't explain the background of the speech made by the South Korean president. March 1 is a special holiday in South Korea, to remember the 20,000 Koreans who died on March 1, 1919, for protesting unarmed on the streets against the Japanese rule. Japan to this day, still considers that day as a disobedient riot against a rightful rule. But to the Koreans, it's a remembrance day for thousands who sacrificed their lives for the country during that one day. Every year, speeches are made, and every year the Korean president makes similar speeches. But the last couple of years, it's been different because of Japan's move to rewrite history. Japan should disregard her speech, because I disagree with her. To me, Japan's apology isn't needed because it won't be enough. South Korea should remain quiet, so that Japan could continue to rewrite history and do what she's doing now, so that Japan's true face can be exposed to the world. Why should South Korea get in the way of Japan that insists on shooting themselves on foot. Let them.

-1 ( +8 / -9 )

Too much exaggeration the death toll was 7,509 and it was not on a single day either. The protest eventually turned into a riot and police stations and other public offices were burned down that resulted in the Japanese police to retaliate.

Basically it's like any other riots that happen all around the world.

-5 ( +7 / -12 )

Korea, for its part, is conveniently ignoring the payments it received from Japan as part of the 1965 Treaty which were supposed to settle all claims

How about Japan also sticking by its 1965 treaty as well? They signed that treaty admitting guilt, and if they really supposedly apologized, as what everyone keeps saying, should not be trying so hard to backtrack on their treaty promise of apologizing. But that's what they've been doing declaring Comfort women were lies, crimes against humanity didn't happen, that Japan didn't do anything wrong. It's Japan that should stick by its treaty signing thereby its apology in 1965, and not keep on backtracking and whitewashing.

1 ( +11 / -10 )

How about Japan also sticking by its 1965 treaty as well?

They have. 100%.

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

Too much exaggeration the death toll was 7,509 and it was not on a single day either. The protest eventually turned into a riot and police stations and other public offices were burned down that resulted in the Japanese police to retaliate. Basically it's like any other riots that happen all around the world.

That's exactly the Japanese attitude that infioriate the Koreans. Thousands of unarmed protestors were gunned down by Japanese troops, and the protest spread throughout all over Korea, for months on end. It didn't end in one day, it took months for Japanese troops to arrest, torture, and execute suspected protestors and ring leaders. Twenty thousand deaths is a conservative number. Japanese even rounded up entire villagers, hundreds of them, into a building and burned it down. It was a mass murder that Japan still denies to this day.

They have. 100%.

How? They keep saying they didn't do anything wrong. If they didn't do anything wrong, what was the apology for?

2 ( +10 / -8 )

I think it's fair to point out that the treaty signed during the resumption of relations between Japan and Korea in the 1960s did not include comfort women at all. The calculations used to determine the proper compensation revolved mainly around the usage of forced labor in factories.

Comfort women did not become a significant issue in Japan or Korea until the 80s and 90s as aging women gradually started to come forward with their experiences.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Comfort women did not become a significant issue in Japan or Korea until the 80s and 90s as aging women gradually started to come forward with their experiences.

In 1985 one Japanese writer Yoslhida, Seiji wrote the book/novel titled "My war crimes". That book was a start of comfort women issue. No one talked/thought anything about the comfort women / sex slaves issue in Japan and S Korea before the book was published in 1985. The book seemed for years to be true story of comfort women during Japanese colonial rule but the writer confessed later the story is fiction he imagined for selling his more books.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

Hotmail

They were neither unarmed or peaceful since they burned down public offices. As for your conservative number, where did you get it from? As always propaganda with inflated numbers to make it look bigger the it really was.

By the way the figures I wrote are from Park Eun-sik's book he wrote recording the time. Some other interesting figures within the book, there were 159 police stations, 77 public offices, 15 post offices,17 houses, 47 churches and 2 schools that were burnt down. There were 46,303 people arrested, 4,026 were accused in which 3,967 were found guilt with the highest charge being three years in prison with 80 were found guilt.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

S Korean president urges Japan to apologise to 'comfort women'

Well, how about it Japan? A once-and-for-all apology, with legislation to prevent people like Hashimoto and Abe downplaying it

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

>The important thing is that the remaining survivors know they were sex slaves, >and that is what really counts, so apologize to them already and move on before they are all dead.

Do you really thing Koreans were only survivers? (That's funny) Actually there are also many Japanese survivors. Some might themselves comfort women, some were users. They know comfort women were prostitutes as a matter of system. That's why Japanese can not accept Korean's lie. It was proven by U.S. army official reports and the report of task force for U.S. congress that comfort women were prostitutes as a matter of system.

http://www.archives.gov/iwg/reports/final-report-2007.pdf http://www.exordio.com/1939-1945/codex/Documentos/report-49-USA-orig.html http://koreanhistorytranslations.blogspot.jp/

Japanese feel sorry to several comfort women who were actually sex slaves. That's why Japanese establish Asian Women's Fund and compensated applicants. But Korean government allured Korean comfort women not to apply the Fund.

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

It takes two for reconciliation.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I am Japanese and I think Japan should apologize and end of story everybody moves on with their lives. I cannot understand why it is so hard to say I am sorry. We need to learn how to loose and accept our mistakes. It was hard times, the world was mad and everybody makes mistakes. Apologizing makes us look better as Japanese, pretending and changing what was real is pointless and only creates more remorse among Japanese and Koreans and other Asians. Aren’t we supposed to be an example of modesty and kindness? And foreigners don’t need to say to Koreans to leave us alone or that Japanese are right and Korea is wrong or say something else to defend us like some people are saying here because we actually know that we are wrong but it is just a matter of pride. In any case, ideally what should be done should be done. Our emperor is in a better understanding of this situation. We need to accept and move on.

10 ( +15 / -5 )

Japanese feel sorry to several comfort women who were actually sex slaves. That's why Japanese establish Asian Women's Fund and compensated applicants. But Korean government allured Korean comfort women not to apply the Fund.

Well, they were sex slaves not comfort women. The latter term applies to those who were voluntary prostitutes. As most were coerced the fund didn't apply to them. Secondly, the money didn't come dorectly from the Japanese government. They didn't want to "dirty their hands" with the issue. As such, the way the money was offered was basically an insult, and belies the claims of many of you that the claims of the sex slaves were settled by the 1965 treaty. The Japanese government wanted to be seen to be doing something, but also wanted to be able to distance itself from it. Now if the money had come directly from them - this issue would've been long since laid to rest

-1 ( +7 / -8 )

@PamiPame

Japan has already apologized times and compensated in the past.

This post is from Ishiwara.

1.When Korea and Japan normalized relations, Japan paid a large sum of money, and it was the Korean government who insisted they will pass it on to victims. 2.The Kono statement of 1993 (as the article mentions). 3.Japan has offered compensation through the Asian Women's Fund. 4.Prime Minister Koizumi has written a letter of apology directly to former comfort women:

-1 ( +8 / -9 )

I am Japanese and I think Japan should apologize and end of story everybody moves on with their lives. I cannot understand why it is so hard to say I am sorry.

Because it's a lie. "200 thousands comfort women" is a lie. If it is not a lie, it would be easy for Japanese to apologize.

I agree with you that Japan should made more apology speeches as to it actually did in the past. For example, invasion into China and several actual sex slave cases (which are acknowledged in Japanese courts and others). But Korean government demand is a different thing.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

Ossan: ""When are the surviving old South Korean men who served in the Imperial Japanese milirary diring WWII and made use of the Comfort Stations and their decendants going to apologize to the former Comfort Women?"

Maybe around the same time as the government apologies to them for forcing them into service at the barrel of a gun. You know, the 'join us or die' option that is very much like what IS does these days, if even given THAT option (by the Imperial Army). You guys will NEVER learn that joining the Imperial Army or becoming a sex slave were not options that people jumped at and jobs where they were treated humanely and made lots of money. They were FORCED into it, at least on most occasions, and the fact that you guys can never admit those things, despite former Imperial troops admitting it, and the women who were there giving testimony that it did -- not you guys or the politicians who deny it ever happened and who claim those people have 'foggy memories' -- you'll constantly be on here deflecting and denying and asking why Koreans can't forget. And it will be because of YOU. And as such, despite you having nothing to do with what happened at the time, you also need to apologize, Ossan, because you help propagate the myth that Japan was some sort of benevolent governor who did nothing wrong, and that the women jumped at the chance to be gang-raped various times daily and bayonetted if they became pregnant, etc.

What's truly sad is that you deny the atrocities by Japanese soldiers, but ask why the Korean soldiers forced into taking up a gun and killing others or possibly engaging in what the Imperial troops did with sex-slaves in your attempts to deflect and deny. Simply astounding.

The current Japanese are of course not at all guilty of any of the crimes committed by Japanese Imperial Troops before and during the war, but many ARE guilty of denying it and white-washing history, and worst of all trying to rescind and/or change apologies, and thus the demand for sincere apologies and reparations. And so even people alive now who had nothing to do withe past but propagate the hatred in denying the past and blaming Koreans for their own victims -- and having the gall to proclaim Japan is painted in a bad light! -- also need to apologize. I don't think the government should be giving any money to SK or its people as they have received money in the past, and it's the government's fault if it was not enough compensation, unless they can find abuses aside from the compensation provided and agreed upon by both governments. BUT, Japan DOES need to issue another further, official, and ratified by the cabinet, apology and a promise that no apology now or in the past will ever be rescinded or attempted to be altered ever again. That won't happen, so don't cry about how Koreans are rightfully upset by the current activities of the deniers in power in Japan.

5 ( +14 / -9 )

This is the summary of Park Geun-hye's speech, how is her speech can possibly be considered hostile to Japan?

http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/news/2015/03/02/0200000000AEN20150302000800315.html

The president’s hard line

President Park Geun-hye expressed hope for a forward looking partnership between South Korea and Japan. In an address on the 96th anniversary of the March 1, 1919, nationwide uprising during Japan’s colonial rule, Park urged Japan to “admit to historical truths courageously and frankly and join hands with South Korea to build a new history as partners for the next 50 years.”

She asked for enlightenment in Japan’s perspective on its past aggressions to open a new chapter in bilateral relations as the country celebrates the 70th anniversary of Korea’s liberation from Japanese colonial rule and the 50th anniversary of diplomatic normalization.

Park’s message to Japan in the March 1 address was nothing entirely new. She reiterated the urgent need for Japan to sincerely apologize to the victims of sexual slavery by Japan’s military during World War II and implored Tokyo to stop distorting historical records in Japanese school textbooks.

0 ( +9 / -9 )

"South Korea urges Japan and world to accept their one-sided view of history, while asking that no one bring up the Jeju Uprising in which 80,000 Koreans were killed by Koreans, because it was a long time ago, and people should move on."

0 ( +8 / -8 )

Evidence of coercion of Comfort Women (Reports from the U.S military & other nations) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IlD1U34aNxE

Comfort Women - NHK admits to government censorship of documentary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Up30OGfl478

Australia Dutch Jan O’Herne reveals her personal experience as a forced sex slave for the Japanese imperial army: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTl66az1nzU

Disturbing Photo's (It even shows a women who was raped & had a bayonet inserted into her) http://www.metroactive.com/papers/metro/12.12.96/cover/china1-9650.html

The rape of Nanking (Westerner's eye witness accounts): https://www.youtube.com/watchv=aQnBvs3LTZw

The Diaries of Minnie Vautrin & John Rabe – Members of the International Safety Zone Committee open pages of the journals they kept during the Rape of Nanking: http://www.metroactive.com/papers/metro/12.12.96/cover/china2-9650.html

Rape in Nanking (Yamada Unit Soldiers giving testimonies): https://www.youtube.com/watch/v=L_XzRaEAer4

Australian government's site on comfort women: http://www.awm.gov.au/exhibitions/alliesinadversity/prisoners/women.asp

The Nanking Documentary Film. The actors in this film portray real people, the words they speak are taken from letters, diaries & other sources: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILS6wGvOWO8&index=4&list=PLYpTsIFcT9z37ePuFOrw_iN8xi408EjEz

2 ( +9 / -7 )

Christopher Glen

Now if the money had come directly from them - this issue would've been long since laid to rest

This was because Japanese government feared that direct payment might undermine 1965 treaty.

Anyway, You are right at this point above.

I think if there are possibilities of reconciliation between Korea and Japan, Japan should directly pay compensation.

But if Korean goverment would not admit '200,000-sex-slaves story is not true', Japan would never go forward into any reconciliation.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Hotmail

How? They keep saying they didn't do anything wrong. If they didn't do anything wrong, what was the apology for?

Who is "they"? The Japanese government has not only paid reparations but apologized repeatedly, officially.

Don't listen to propaganda.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

PamiPameMAR. 02, 2015 - 12:35PM JST I am Japanese and I think Japan should apologize and end of story everybody moves on with their lives. I cannot understand why it is so hard to say I am sorry. We need to learn how to loose and accept our mistakes. It was hard times, the world was mad and everybody makes mistakes. Apologizing makes us look better as Japanese, pretending and changing what was real is pointless and only creates more remorse among Japanese and Koreans and other Asians. Aren’t we supposed to be an example of modesty and kindness? And foreigners don’t need to say to Koreans to leave us alone or that Japanese are right and Korea is wrong or say something else to defend us like some people are saying here because we actually know that we are wrong but it is just a matter of pride. In any case, ideally what should be done should be done. Our emperor is in a better understanding of this situation. We need to accept and move on.

My faith in Japanese as a compassionate and honest people has been restored. Thank you, with open, honest and reasonable Japanese youth like Pami, there is a positive future for Japan.

3 ( +10 / -7 )

I personally believe that, in principle, Japan is "correct" in saying that military prostitution was largely a legal thing, done with payment. There is evidence of this, and if there is evidence, then it's "true" at least in those cases.

That said, whatever reasonable system was in place in 1935 or 1938 was not when things were going to hell in 1945, so along the way everything probably went out the window, and women were in fact "enslaved" (or given no choice but to enter that area of work if they wanted to go on living). As such, Japan should probably apologize.

It should NOT be to "Korea" though, since that implies this was a Korean only thing, when logical requires we realize it was more complex than that. It should be to women affected, no matter where they were (Guam, the Philippines, Borneo, Manchuria, South Korea, Taiwan), some payment should be offered, but "Korea" itself should be snubbed for using the plight of the women for their own political gain, and (as usual) to make its people complain about Japan rather than realize the failings of their own government.

H.Kosaka posted translations of old Korean newspapers (http://koreanhistorytranslations.blogspot.jp/) which is fascinating reading. It mostly applies to the Korean War era but shows the standard of the time were not today's.

-4 ( +6 / -10 )

This post is from Ishiwara.

1.When Korea and Japan normalized relations, Japan paid a large sum of money, and it was the Korean government who insisted they will pass it on to victims. 2.The Kono statement of 1993 (as the article mentions). 3.Japan has offered compensation through the Asian Women's Fund. 4.Prime Minister Koizumi has written a letter of apology directly to former comfort women:

These links quote Abe, Hashimoto, and Ishihara (effectively cancelling out previous apologies) http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/1544471/Japanese-PM-denies-wartime-comfort-women-were-forced.html http://ajw.asahi.com/article/behind_news/politics/AJ201305270109

1 ( +9 / -8 )

My favorite part about reading these comments about WWII, is how incredibly naive some Japanese are. How they unfortunately don't know the real story of their people's involvement in that war, because they have been taught a distorted version of that War. So naturally, they know all about the horror of the Atomic bombs dropped on their cities, but they know nothing about what led up to that decision to drop them. Ask any Japanese about WWII and if they are under 60 years old, they will tell you the Japanese Military won a glorious victory at Pearl Harbor because the US and the Brits wouldn't stay out of their business. Then as a payback, the US dropped 2 Atomic bombs out of revenge. Nothing about what happened in-between. Oh and apparently, there were thousands of professional prostitutes waiting at the docks to be shipped off to Brothels like Geisha's waiting to be picked as the #1 Lotus flower for the Daimyo!

1 ( +9 / -8 )

@Christopher Glen

Hashimoto and Ishihara do not have the authority to speak for the Japanese government so I'm not sure how they can cancel out any official statement or position of the Japanese government.

Abe could potentially do that but the specific statement quoted in the article you posted was not an official statement of the government but his personal thoughts on a very specific aspect of the comfort women subject that is still open to historical debate in Japan. The question is whether or not the Japanese military went around rounding up women at gunpoint, as opposed to simply letting private brokers handle the recruitment of comfort women.

Later on he said that his government will stand by the original Kono Statement.

The Telegraph article also quotes a former Korean comfort woman by the name of Lee Young-Soo. This is really unfortunate that people keep publishing their claims without any attempts at all to verify their testimony or even mention how their testimony has changed over the years. Lee Young-Soo is well known to have changed her story about the circumstances of her "kidnapping" multiple times. In the 90s she was simply deceived by a brother owner. Later on she started claiming that she was kidnapped at gun point. She told the US Congress in her testimony that she ran away from her village with a friend of hers and met up with a broker by a river. This story was given after she was touring Japan telling people she was kidnapped by Japanese soldiers from her own house.

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

Marcus A. Perkins

Ask any Japanese about WWII and if they are under 60 years old, they will tell you the Japanese Military won a glorious victory at Pearl Harbor because the US and the Brits wouldn't stay out of their business.

Utter nonsense, Marcus. Ask most any younger Japanese person about the war years and you'll more likely get something like "We were so ignorant then, I cannot understand why we would go to war. Fortunately we love peace now."

I've had this conversation MANY times, and not once have I heard anyone talk about "glorious victory at Pearl Harbor", only about how terrible war is and how it should be avoided.

I wish the Americans had learned the same lesson as well....

1 ( +8 / -7 )

Utter nonsense, Marcus. Ask most any younger Japanese person about the war years and you'll more likely get something like "We were so ignorant then, I cannot understand why we would go to war. Fortunately we love peace now."

I recently had one guy struggle to tell me about the first Tokugawa shogun of Japan - a pivotal figure in the country's history. Only a minority of people had any idea of what they did at Pearl Harbour - let alone the fact they bombed northern Australia as well. I do agree about the "love peace" part. Unfortunately most people are too passive to oppose Mr Abe's plans to change all this. Fingers crossed though that Mr Abe sees sense and says the right thing on August 15th

5 ( +10 / -5 )

It seems the facts in this matter are as follows:

There has been previous apologies from Japans top representatives. An apology from the Japanese people can't be more clear than that. Still it is not enough for the group of people that have a strong sense of right and wrong, at least from their own view. I fear it will never be enough so it is pointless for Japan to continue apologizing. Abe has made comments about an interest to revise something he believes is wrong in the ww2 history narrative. Since most people in Japan already know the history and discuss these issues, I think Abe will loose face if he in fact makes the revision to a real state issue. It will only end in the loss of respect. If Park really want to do something for the elderly that a long time ago suffered from the Japanese occupation she should make sure that they have what they need and offer psychological support. Constantly harassing todays Japan will most likely not solve anything for these women.
-5 ( +3 / -8 )

I fear it will never be enough so it is pointless for Japan to continue apologizing

You and many others have trouble grasping this simple point: If people give apologies, but then soon after someone else goes out and denies them (and their right to do so is considered "free speech") how would that make South Korea and China feel? Aggrieved that the apologies aren't sincerely given would be the best answer. Until Japan changes its attitude on this point this current situation will never end

0 ( +7 / -7 )

This Chicken-head woman is using Comfort women for her own political gain. In S. Korea, she was called Chicken Head woman.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

PamiPame, I don't believe you are Japanese becuase you don't know what Japanese know.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Japanese feel sorry to several comfort women who were actually sex slaves. That's why Japanese establish Asian Women's Fund and compensated applicants.

No. Japan established Asian Women's Fund because Koreans did not stop demanding apology and compensation.

-13 ( +5 / -18 )

Why don't you just stop reporting about South Korea demanding apologies? I find this counter-productive. Just like Japan, South Korea has as many nationalists believing on every propaganda from the books they read. I don't believe South Korea will ever forget as long as the president like her keeps the presidential position and reminding more of the past. Believe me when I say this, South Korea is emotionally charged about everything especially about the history, no way they will let go. And you must admit, Abe's government clearly is giddy about upsetting the neighbours even though it's all obvious how they would react.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

Judging the actions of the past from the comparative peace of the present all too often descends into acrimony with each side accusing the other of denial or hypocrisy. Once the genie of war is unleashed, brute inhumanity too easily becomes the norm and atrocity begets atrocity in a race to the bottom. The simplistic blame game being indulged in here by both sides stands in the way of us gaining a deeper understanding of ourselves and about our propensity to accept and excuse excess in times of war.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Mard9WrYn2I

2 ( +2 / -0 )

VincehwrMAR. 02, 2015 - 04:15PM JST Why don't you just stop reporting about South Korea demanding apologies? I find this counter-productive.

It's world news; 120 newspapers around the world have covered it so far. Don't Japan can ignore it.

https://news.google.com/news/story?ncl=dL97j30flPya0QMACCQsA4R2KFGoM&q=japan&lr=English&hl=en&sa=X&ei=oxb0VPiDOsr98QXyg4CwAQ&ved=0CCsQqgIwAA

Believe me when I say this, South Korea is emotionally charged about everything especially about the history, no way they will let go.

Sounds like projection on your part to me. I agree Korea is fairly hyped up about it all, but not without reason. All they want is recognition and a greater expression/attitude of remorse from Japan. From the Abe regime that's probably not going to happen anytime soon. We'll have to hope for a more liberal government which there never really has been in Japan. The Liberal Democratic party is the most inaccurately named party in the history of modern politics. Japan is losing face by the day. Shame, I've always loved my second home Japan.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

S Korean president urges Japan to apologise to 'comfort women'

I thought they already had, in 1993. Or do they want every Japanese PM to apologise when they get into office?

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Unfortunately, this incident was just one act of many acts done by one country to another. As much as they believe this issue needs to be resolved, I would think present day events are much in need of being solved. Priorities needs to be given to the many accidents occurring in South Korea that includes the recent sideway just caving in along with a maniac with nukes as your next door neighbor.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

tinawatanabe: "No. Japan established Asian Women's Fund because Koreans did not stop demanding apology and compensation."

I thought you said you don't speak for all Japanese, tina? Need me to quote your contradictions yet again? In any case, all you needed to say is "I don't feel sorry for the sex slaves at all".

0 ( +8 / -8 )

igloobuyerMAR. 02, 2015 - 04:59PM JST Sounds like projection on your part to me. I agree Korea is fairly hyped up about it all, but not without reason. All they want is recognition and a greater expression/attitude of remorse from Japan. From the Abe regime that's probably not going to happen anytime soon. We'll have to hope for a more liberal government which there never really has been in Japan. The Liberal Democratic party is the most inaccurately named party in the history of modern politics. Japan is losing face by the day. Shame, I've always loved my second home Japan.

I'm sorry but it's a waste of time asking for apology from LDP when they even have much trouble acknowledging Japan's intention in WW2. I mean they are still spinning that narrative that the imperial army was protecting the Asia from European Invasion and South Korea is asking for sympathetic retribution from such party as LDP. Also this party doesn't seem to want to give up its seat any time soon, I think there are better ways to raise the awareness for comfort woman issue rather than just rallying and squabbling with LDP.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Also this party doesn't seem to want to give up its seat any time soon,

So this seems a case of Japan "cutting off its nose to spite its face"

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

Unfortunately most people are too passive to oppose Mr Abe's plans to change all this.

When I see comments like this I wonder if the person making it actually knows any Japanese people, even bothers to ask people what they think.

Just because someone is not shoving their opinion in your face doesn't mean they have no opinion.

The thought that Japanese people are "too passive" to oppose major constitutional change is both offensive and completely ridiculous.

I suggest you actually talk to some regular Japanese people, not kids you meet at your eikaiwa lessons.

-2 ( +7 / -9 )

PandabelleMAR. 02, 2015 - 05:57PM JST Unfortunately most people are too passive to oppose Mr Abe's plans to change all this. When I see comments like this I wonder if the person making it actually knows any Japanese people, even bothers to ask people what they think. Just because someone is not shoving their opinion in your face doesn't mean they have no opinion. The thought that Japanese people are "too passive" to oppose major constitutional change is both offensive and completely ridiculous. I suggest you actually talk to some regular Japanese people, not kids you meet at your eikaiwa lesson

Come on, the Japanese are possibly the most passive democratic electorate in the world. Very low voting numbers, and very low political participation or interest except for the elderly and farmers. I don't think I ever met a Japanese person interested in politics in the entire 17 years I lived there (except for a few news journos I knew).

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

Time running out? For what?

I don't think I ever met a Japanese person interested in politics in the entire 17 years I lived there...

The only people interested are the Japanese version of the bible thumpers,most annoyingly,when an election is upcoming.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Whilst wacking away on my company Samsung smartphone a close school friend bulked out loud with almost shakespearean tragic indignation. Hamlet like, reminiscent of Yorick's skull in the 'gravedigger scene' as I lifted to my ear. You bought Korean!!!!!?????.

After some awkward oohing and aahing, huffing and puffing, ducking and diving, astonished I asked why?

Out came an analysis of the 'difficult' relationship between SK and Japan that reduced 'comfort women' to greedy tarts. Employed as a pharmaceutical analyst with biochemical and clinical masters under her belt, reaching a senior position with a  pharmaceutical industry leader, I was flabbergasted. After some heated argument,  all pretence of reasoned debate was discarded as the conversation degenerated into quarrelsome squabbling. After a three day stand off we agreed never to broach the subject again....... We decided to brush the subject under the carpet. Because why ruin a friendship when one can simply settle for the status quo......

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Well I do think I´ve considered the issue of apologies and counter statements sometimes. However I haven't heard that Abe has managed to make factual revisions about these things yet. As you mention one complicating issue is ethics about change over time. Can a new leader change anything and everything just because he was elected by the Japanese people? In theory yes but in practice no. In theory the people has given the leader mandate to fulfill his promises during his reign. In practice the position of the leader is always situated in history with wealth, problems and hardships, which roughly is the same as previous commitments, deals and contracts with the people and other nations. The problem with the everlasting complaints is an old matter. They have been ongoing for quite some time with little regard to what the Japanese government has done. Sure the arguments about a sincere apology has been used, but so far no one has presented a meaningful definition of what a sincere and truly acceptable apology may be in the political sphere. Seems it is much easier to state that it was insincere. Therefore the most likely scenario is that the complaining will continue no matter what the j government does. Abes actions may lead to lauder or more quiet complaints, thats all. The real issue is if Park takes good care of these poor women.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Her approval ratings are about as low as they can get.....out comes the J-bashing!

4 ( +11 / -7 )

Just make apology every year as annual apology event. But if wants to compensate, don't give to Korean Govt.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Papi2013 is quite correct in pointing to what Park Geun-hye actually said, per Yonhap. And below is what Jiji reported. This is evolution and mostly positive. Park and Abe are not where they should be but they are getting closer.

Park Wants Japan, S. Korea to Be Future-Oriented Partners

Seoul, March 1 (Jiji Press)--Japan and South Korea need to become more mature partners over the next 50 years and work together to write a new history, South Korean President Park Geun-hye said in a speech on Sunday. At the same time, Park urged Japan to have the courage and honestly admit the truths of history, referring to so-called comfort women, mainly from the Korean Peninsula, who were forced into prostitution for Japanese troops before and during World War II. Although she pointed to problems associated with bilateral history, her speech placed greater emphasis on repairing the bilateral relations that have been strained chiefly over historical issues and taking a future-oriented approach, with this year marking the 50th anniversary of the normalization of Japan-South Korea diplomatic ties. She is apparently taking the stance of waiting to see the attitudes of Japan, including the statement Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe plans to issue this summer to mark the 70th anniversary of the end of the war. Park delivered the speech at a ceremony in Seoul on the anniversary of the 1919 independence movement in the Korean Peninsula, then under Japanese colonial rule.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Strangerland "What does that have to do with Japan apologize for its wrongs?"

To see how sincere Korea is about human dignity. Real human dignity concerns not only what was done to you but also what you did to people. Korea has been ignoring what it did to Vietnamese civilians (more recently), while sticking to what Japan did to its people (far more remotely).

2 ( +8 / -6 )

I thought they already had, in 1993. Or do they want every Japanese PM to apologise when they get into office?

What Park really said was:

At the same time, Park urged Japan to have the courage and honestly admit the truths of history,

In other words, stop messing around with trying to change history by distorting and hiding the truth. That sounds like a perfectly reasonable request to me, considering what's been happening in Japan.

-3 ( +7 / -10 )

Mainstream historians say up to 200,000 women, mainly from Korea but also from China, Indonesia and other Asian nations, were forced into sexual slavery for Japanese troops during the World War II

Who are mainstream historians exactly? This is cheap journalism.

-3 ( +9 / -12 )

"Fathers shall not be put to death because of their children, nor shall children be put to death because of their fathers. Each one shall be put to death for his own sin". It's like it's not the present Japanese were the "war criminals", it's not the present South Korean were the "victims".

Modern JPs are already born with tainted pride yet SKs seems wanted to paint it more dirty. I believe that these so-called "deniers" (PM Abe and his cronies) are just got enough of these and become "Ultra-Nationalist" but I admit that they are doing it all wrong. SK people (probably the gov't too) should see why these suddenly happening. BTW, when this all started and cause?

3 ( +5 / -2 )

The crazy Zaitokukai & every other silent supporter are to blame for adding fuel to Park's fire. Oh!! . . . & lets not mentioned the Tokyo Governor elections last Dec. when some crazy right-wingers seeking office went as far to say that "comfort women" never existed & the "Nanjing Massacare" was a lie. Japanese like that are destroying their country.

As for the "sex slaves" statues, they wont remove them. Perhaps, now more additional statues wiil be errected in response to Japan's defiance.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

Toshiaki HaginoyaMAR. 02, 2015 - 10:14PM JST Mainstream historians say up to 200,000 women, mainly from Korea but also from China, Indonesia and other Asian nations, were forced into sexual slavery for Japanese troops during the World War II Who are mainstream historians exactly? This is cheap journalism.

I think it means the majority of historians around the world including Japan.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

As for the "sex slaves" statues, they wont remove them. Perhaps, now more additional statues wiil be errected in response to Japan's defiance.

It seems that whole world would see South Korea miserable country as long as they are still living in the miserable past. Better move on for better future than decades ago.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

@miyamoto

And japanese men will always be the "stereotype" rapers, plunderers, gropers, Enjokosai Advocates. etc. Is it any wonder why there are so many "naughty" bars, soaplands, and sex-hotels here. Japan sets an institutionalized pattern of these sorts. So isn't it logical to say there were sex slaves. . .and the these Korean women were not prostitutes?

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

But a tranche of the political right, including Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, still claim the wartime army brothels were staffed by professional prostitutes.

False. It's the investigations that lead to the issuance of Kono Statement revealed that they were staffed by prostitutes.

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

@Wc626

And japanese men will always be the "stereotype" rapers, plunderers, gropers, Enjokosai Advocates. etc. Is it any wonder why there are so many "naughty" bars, soaplands, and sex-hotels here. Japan sets an institutionalized pattern of these sorts.

While this is not neccessarily untrue (haha, sorry but some Japanese men are true creeps and a few are downright criminals!) such argument can easily backfire you when people often find Korean women in prostitution business in countires like Australia and the USA. They sometimes even bother to name their "massage parler" Japanesey such as "Sakura" or "Fuji" or simply pretend to be Japanese. Ehh, what's up?

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostitution_in_South_Korea

Prostitution in South Korea is illegal,but according to The Korea Women's Development Institute, the sex trade in Korea was estimated to amount to 14 trillion South Korean won ($13 billion) in 2007, roughly 1.6 percent of the nation's gross domestic product.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

zones2surfMar. 02, 2015 - 08:17AM JST Korea, for its part, is conveniently ignoring the payments it received from Japan as part of the 1965 Treaty which were supposed to settle all claims.

Huh? Show me where in the 1965 treaty that "comfort Issue" was resolved? It was not resolved. In 1965, the Japanese goverment asked Korean goverment to show the concrete number of conscripted workers and soldiers, dead and injured and how much unpaid wages were. They asked to "show the evidences and they would pay". Korea agreed and investigated them. What I want to clarify here is that Korea didn't claim the compensation for the war time prostitutes. Why didn't they? It's because there was no abducted prostitute. Nobody said at the time in Korea, those prostitutes were abducted. Everyone knew there were many women who were so poor that they sold themselves to live and the Japan army didn't have to abduct Korean women. There were many Korean volunteers for Japan army at the time. Therefore Koreans didn't claim it at that time. The Korean goverment did not disclose and pursue the comfort women issue at the time. It's still an open issue that has not been resolved.

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

@sfjp330:

Since you addressed this to my comment, I wanted to revert.

I am unsure of what you are trying to say here and why you have an issue with my statement.

On the one hand, you are saying that the issue has not been resolved because the treaty did not specifically reference the comfort women and pay compensation as it relates to them. Because, according to you, they were volunteers and Korea did not seek compensation. That would be consistent with the explanation put forth by some Japanese.

On the other hand, you are saying it was not resolved and that it is still an open issue because the Korea government did not disclose and pursue the comfort women issue at the time. And, therefore, it was specifically not addressed.

So, I am unsure as to the point you are trying to make and, specifically, why you are taking issue with what I wrote.

To be clear, what I wrote was simply a statement of fact. When the Treaty was concluded, the Korean government sought and received compensation, as documented in the supporting documents to the Treaty. You are absolutely correct, there was no mention of comfort women at all and no specific compensation with regards to them, at least not as far as I can tell.

You have offered a rationale as to why the Korean government did not request/claim specific compensation for them. I am not going to debate the potential rationales here. The point I was making was that, regardless of the reason, the Korean government did not request any compensation for this specific issue. And, when the Treaty was signed and the monies paid by Japan, that settled all future claims, regardless of the nature.

So, officially, Korea gave up all future claims from Japan by way of the settlement and the agreement. Rightly or wrongly, that was the effect of the Treaty and the settlement. And that any claims by any Koreans individually would be addressed by the Korean government. At the Korean governments request/insistence.

These are just the facts, unless someone can show me that these facts are incorrect. And I was merely trying to point out that the Korean government has not been honest with its own people about what they negotiated with and agreed to with Japan. And certainly have not been honest about what happened to the monies Japan paid and why those monies did not make it to individual Koreans.

I never claimed that the "comfort issue was resolved". That has a much broader meaning. I was simply stating that all claims were settled, as per the treaty, and that, legally, therefore, there is no basis for further claims. Even if the claims in question were not specific claims addressed under the treaty.

If I am missing your point and your issue with my original statement, happy to address if you can clarify further.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

To be clear, what I wrote was simply a statement of fact. When the Treaty was concluded, the Korean government sought and received compensation, as documented in the supporting documents to the Treaty. You are absolutely correct, there was no mention of comfort women at all and no specific compensation with regards to them, at least not as far as I can tell.

Actually, the discussion in regards to 'comfort women' did take place during the treaty negotiations, specifically in May 19, 1953 (第 2 次会談請求権会議) where the Korean counterpart requested to take in consideration of the financial assets belong to them, which was left overseas.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

@NYtoday.

Point taken. In Southern CA, those establishment are dominated by Thais and southeastern asians. Sure Korean has its sex industry (do not most?), but it doesnt mean that comfort women were not coerced & systenatically raped by JIA.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

@nigelboy:

Thanks for that insight. I was not aware of that specific discussion. I am looking at a couple of websites regarding this in Japanese. Any chance you can pass along the source/site that you reference/use? Would like to check it out.

Noting that this discussion took place in '53, have you found any reference to this carrying through to the final treaty documents in '65?

Always good to learn new facts.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

kwattMAR. 03, 2015 - 12:22AM JST As for the "sex slaves" statues, they wont remove them. Perhaps, now more additional statues wiil be errected in response to Japan's defiance. It seems that whole world would see South Korea miserable country as long as they are still living in the miserable past. Better move on for better future than decades ago.

Wrong. Do you read the international media? You'll find there is significant sympathy for Korea and little to none for Japan on this issue. I think most people see it for what it is - a country skirting its responsibilities.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

http://www.f8.wx301.smilestart.ne.jp/nihonkokai/kiri/kojinnseikyuukenn.pdf

Noting that this discussion took place in '53, have you found any reference to this carrying through to the final treaty documents in '65?

No. Don't know what you mean by "carrying through" as if there exists any more to the issue.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_massacres_in_South_Korea http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostitutes_in_South_Korea_for_the_U.S.military http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lai%C4%90%E1%BA%A1i_H%C3%A0n http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_history_of_South_Korea_during_the_Vietnam_War

Korea must know the history of oneself

1 ( +6 / -5 )

...an increasingly aggressive campaign in Japan to claim these “comfort women” were common prostitutes.

'cause nothing makes people like you more when you call their grandmothers whores.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

Politicizing war past by demanding apologies will not help to "move on" but will deepen the wound of past war.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Politicizing war past by demanding apologies will not help to "move on" but will deepen the wound of past war.

You've got your cause and effect backwards there. Moving on cannot happen, because of the deep wounds created by the past war, that have not properly been addressed.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

To date the Japanese government has failed to definitively address the issue of the sex slaves. The Asian women's fund of the 1990s was the equivalent of throwing a few crumbs from the table, and being anonymous about it. Japan has a great chance to finally lay the issue to rest by issuing an irrevocable apology on August 15th. That more than compensation money would do wonders for the healing process

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Time for Japan to stop just thinking 'again' and look into their own history to see why so many people are still hurting from their war antics. Ignore it at Japan and look worse and worse in the eyes of the world.

Laughable. You know who looks "worse and worse" in the eyes of the world? ROK.

Plenty of other countries suffered a lot more than ROK in WW2. I have yet to see any other country in the world still whining and harping along about how they were done dirty .. and more money please. Every other country in the world has moved along with life - I don't count PRC cause nobody expects any decent behavior from them.

If ROK wants to stop embarrassing itself in the international community they should just shut up about WW2 and Japan once and for all. What a pack of tools.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Plenty of other countries suffered a lot more than ROK in WW2. I have yet to see any other country in the world still whining and harping along about how they were done dirty

Other countries don't whine and harp on because they a, weren't colonised for 35 years and b, in the case of Germany it has fully compensated its victims, apologised to them, and c, taught its people what it did to boot. Japan is certainly not teaching its people what happened

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Other countries don't whine and harp on because they a, weren't colonised for 35 years and b, in the case of Germany it has fully compensated its victims, apologised to them, and c, taught its people what it did to boot. Japan is certainly not teaching its people what happened

Again with the lame Germany comparison. Korea was never subjected to anything remotely close to the Holocaust.

The Japanese administration in Korea has done more to advance the interests of Korea than any other government has done to advance the interests of any country in the world. And if Korea were a self-governing country instead of a Japanese colonial dependency, be hailed throughout the Western world as an astounding example of national progress.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

LOL. The contradictions are almost hilarious if the topic wasn't so sordid. It must be some sort of Japanese zen logic to claim you've already apologized for something you deny at the same time. The women were prostitutes but Japan already apologized??? Nice "apology."

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

NigelboyMar. 03, 2015 - 02:08AM JST False. It's the investigations that lead to the issuance of Kono Statement revealed that they were staffed by prostitutes.

But my broader point is to ask why the Japanese authorities don't spend more time tracking down and verifying the testimony of surviving IJA veterans and less trying to undermine the testimony of victims. I assume everyone would welcome that, if they value the truth. Unfortunately, Japan's right-wing establishment, as well as the many Japanese citizens who have bought its disgraceful propaganda, are largely impervious to reason and facts; they are now engaged in something of a crusade to attack history itself.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

But my broader point is to ask why the Japanese authorities don't spend more time tracking down and verifying the testimony of surviving IJA veterans and less trying to undermine the testimony of victims. I assume everyone would welcome that, if they value the truth. Unfortunately, Japan's right-wing establishment, as well as the many Japanese citizens who have bought its disgraceful propaganda, are largely impervious to reason and facts; they are now engaged in something of a crusade to attack history itself.

"...With these documents that were obtained in this way as a basis, it also began to analyze hearings of military-related parties and those responsible for managing the comfort stations, as well as testimonies collected by the Korean Council, and was able to practically finish compiling the report on the study results. The recognition obtained through these series of studies was that it was not possible to confirm that women were “forcefully recruited.”.."

To add, the investigation of comfort women testimonies were already done by Prof. Pak Yuha and Professor Ahn Byeong-jik which basically came to the same conclusion.

As to your assertion that they would not welcome the reinvestigation of the above is false. They would like nothing more to have this reinvestigated including the cross examination of these women and detail by detail breakdown and analysis of their prior testimonies and let the chips fall where they may.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

To add, the investigation of comfort women testimonies were already done by Prof. Pak Yuha and Professor Ahn Byeong-jik which basically came to the same conclusion.

I'm very much doubt the term "comfort women" can be applied to all 200,000 women approx who were forced into "service" for the IJA. A small number were volunteers, certainly. By using this term to describe all of them, you are insulting their memory - and those who are still alive. Let's make one thing clear - the sex slaves came from other countries besides South Korea

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I'm very much doubt the term "comfort women" can be applied to all 200,000 women approx who were forced into "service" for the IJA

Please follow the discussion on the related thread that you have participated in. You have yet to produce a single evidence to support the above narrative. When asked, you simply disappear and move to another related article to repeat the same thing.

By using this term to describe all of them, you are insulting their memory - and those who are still alive

Never used that term. Please stop with the ad hominem.

Let's make one thing clear - the sex slaves came from other countries besides South Korea

So? How does this support your narrative when there are no evidence regarding the Korean comfort women? BTW, your narrative also state that comfort women were mostly Korean. By sheer logic, I would think that there are mountain of evidence in regards to Korean women to support your narrative but apparently that's not the case, is it?

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

You have yet to produce a single evidence to support the above narrative

Maybe you can ask the ghosts of IJA personell to bring back the evidence they burned. Find me the evidence of one IJA soldier who says he did not make use of sex slaves. Not the current crop of politicians. An actual IJA soldier. Otherwise, the overwhelming testimonial evidence of the sex slaves will suffice. Keep at it South Korea

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Maybe you can ask the ghosts of IJA personell to bring back the evidence they burned.

"my dog ate my homework" type response once again.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

If only the Japanese Politician recognize the confort women, the relation Japan-South K, will be much better.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

And I urge President Park Geun-Hye to apologize to the Comfort Women for her father Park Chung-Hee having used the comfort stations when he was an officer in the IJA during WWII. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Park_Chung-hee#mediaviewer/File:Park_Japan.JPG

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@ nigelboy MAR. 07, 2015 - 02:45AM JST

The Japanese administration in Korea has done more to advance the interests of Korea than any other government has done to advance the interests of any country in the world.

A cynical statement and a display of a complete lack of understanding of colonial history in Asia.

I don't think anybody except Japanese right-wingers doubt that Korea has suffered tremendously under an unjust and brutal Japanese rule from 1910 to 1945.

And if Korea were a self-governing country instead of a Japanese colonial dependency, be hailed throughout the Western world as an astounding example of national progress.

Either your syntax got mixed up here or you missed the fact that Korea (I suppose you are talking about South Korea here) is a self-governing country since 1945 and a democratic nation since 1987. Probably you want to say that Japan is responsible for South Korean progress, what would be an absurd statement.

And it is simply not true there is no evidence for coercion of "Comfort Women". There are hundreds of testimonies from former comfort women of various nations that all provide evidence for coercion of young and innocent women by the Japanese military and by its henchmen. Women who had no idea that they were to be forced into prostitution for the Japanese military once they were deported to a foreign country or interned in a Japanese military "comfort station".

Even the Asian Women's Fund website, which is biased towards the Japanese side, is full of such evidence of coercion, but maybe some people have their own strange definition of what the term "evidence" means.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

A cynical statement and a display of a complete lack of understanding of colonial history in Asia.

I should of qualified them with quotes for they were passages from Alleyne Ireland, an expert in the field of colonization policies at that time. He is certainly more qualified than your assessment.

And it is simply not true there is no evidence for coercion of "Comfort Women". There are hundreds of testimonies from former comfort women of various nations that all provide evidence for coercion of young and innocent women by the Japanese military and by its henchmen. Women who had no idea that they were to be forced into prostitution for the Japanese military once they were deported to a foreign country or interned in a Japanese military "comfort station".

There are no evidence other than that of Semarang case. I believe Jan Ruff O'Herne's testimony because she maintains the same story every time she testifies in regards to even the littlest of details. As to the so-called "others", I simply don't take their changing testimonies at face value especially in light of the fact that none of the surviving Korean comfort women initially stated that they were abducted by IJA.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I should of qualified them with quotes for they were passages from Alleyne Ireland, an expert in the field of colonization policies at that time. He is certainly more qualified than your assessment.

I have never heard of "Alleyne Ireland", but maybe you can tell us what makes his assessments more qualified then my assessment? By the way my "assessment" is also the tenor of all comprehensive works on Korean history I know of.

As to the so-called "others", I simply don't take their changing testimonies at face value

So you at least acknowledge that there is evidence, just that you don't take it for "face value", or to put it in frank language: that you believe all Korean former comfort women are lying.

especially in light of the fact that none of the surviving Korean comfort women initially stated that they were abducted by IJA.

We are not only talking about Korean women and O'Herne, but also about testimonies by Taiwanese, Philippine, Indonesian, Chinese and women from other nations. And in the Korean case the main question is not whether Korean women were abducted directly by the IJA, but about deception and coercion by henchmen for the Japanese military.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I have never heard of "Alleyne Ireland", but maybe you can tell us what makes his assessments more qualified then my assessment? By the way my "assessment" is also the tenor of all comprehensive works on Korean history I know of.

British scholar on colonial studies at University of Chicago. The passage is from his book, "The New Korea"

So you at least acknowledge that there is evidence, just that you don't take it for "face value", or to put it in frank language: that you believe all Korean former comfort women are lying.

Like I stated on a related thread that you participated, I place no weight.

We are not only talking about Korean women and O'Herne, but also about testimonies by Taiwanese, Philippine, Indonesian, Chinese and women from other nations. And in the Korean case the main question is not whether Korean women were abducted directly by the IJA, but about deception and coercion by henchmen for the Japanese military.

We are talking about Korean women. Please read the headline.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

British scholar on colonial studies at University of Chicago. The passage is from his book, "The New Korea"

Are you talking about a book from 1926? Apparently Alleyne Ireland was studying colonial administration when the US was still a colonial power and his statements are now (in 2015) seen in a completely different light.

Even the University of Chicago would never claim that Irelands assessments are of any scientific value today decades after the colonial era is over.

Maybe you know of a more recent and scientifically more relevant example that could back up your absurd claims about Korean history?

We are talking about Korean women. Please read the headline.

If we're talking about evidence against the Japanese military we're not only talking about Korean women, and btw it was you who mentioned non-Korean O'Herne first.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Are you talking about a book from 1926? Apparently Alleyne Ireland was studying colonial administration when the US was still a colonial power and his statements are now (in 2015) seen in a completely different light.

Why would that be? I think it's rather lame to reassess the issue of colonial administration based on today's values.

If we're talking about evidence against the Japanese military we're not only talking about Korean women, and btw it was you who mentioned non-Korean O'Herne first.

I merely wanted to point out that I do take, on occasion, take testimony at certain value. Consistency is one of them.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Why would that be?

It would be that colonialization was wrong and against the principles of humanity.

It is important to notice that the study field of "colonial administration" was about how to efficiently enslave humans and gain profit from oppressed populations. It is for obvious reasons by no means part of historical studies today.

I think it's rather lame to reassess the issue of colonial administration based on today's values.

Why is that lame? Or do you want to say colonialization was a good thing and we shouldn't condemn it?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

It would be that colonialization was wrong and against the principles of humanity.

But it worked. As he states, "And if Korea were a self-governing country instead of a Japanese colonial dependency, be hailed throughout the Western world as an astounding example of national progress."

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

But it worked. As he states, "And if Korea were a self-governing country instead of a Japanese colonial dependency, be hailed throughout the Western world as an astounding example of national progress."

nigelboy, to take a 1926 book by a scholar of "colonial administration" (somebody who is studying how to efficiently administer colonies!) as an indication for the positive effects of Japanese colonialization is plainly absurd and impudent towards a former colony.

You should update your knowledge about Korean history and what kind of horrible effect the Japanese colonial rule actually had on Korea. The Japanese annexation of the Korean peninsula led to an absolut disaster in Korea. The country was drawn into a war, partly destroyed, its population terrorized and forced to serve the Japanese empire. Finally the nation was divided, just to become the stage for another horrifying war. All this a direct result of Japanese colonialization, fascism and militarism forced onto Korea.

If you want to call this "an astounding example of national progress", nigelboy, we get a very clear idea about your and your fellow right-wingers distorted and irrational view of history.

I believe Japan has an obligation to be utterly precautious in its manners towards a nation it has forced into decades of oppression and despair. While it is obvious that some Korean nationalists are trying to exploit the Japanese guilt, the scars of the Korean people inflicted by the Japanese invaders are genuin and not something you can wipe out by paying a lump sum and apologizing in a rather ambiguous manner.

Politicians like Park come and go, but the Korean people are there to stay and I have no doubt that they sooner or later would be able to properly make their peace with the Japanese people if there'd be a consistent, long-term and sincere attempt to reconciliate from the Japanese side.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

nigelboy, to take a 1926 book by a scholar of "colonial administration" (somebody who is studying how to efficiently administer colonies!) as an indication for the positive effects of Japanese colonialization is plainly absurd and impudent towards a former colony.

The results speaks for themselves.

You should update your knowledge about Korean history and what kind of horrible effect the Japanese colonial rule actually had on Korea. The Japanese annexation of the Korean peninsula led to an absolut disaster in Korea. The country was drawn into a war, partly destroyed, its population terrorized and forced to serve the Japanese empire. Finally the nation was divided, just to become the stage for another horrifying war. All this a direct result of Japanese colonialization, fascism and militarism forced onto Korea.

Forced to serve? No. The draft for Koreans were implemented in latter part of 1944. Those who were subjected to the order then did not go to the war front as the war ended by the time training period ended. As to the destruction of the peninsula, this is as a result of Korean war after the Japanese left.

I believe Japan has an obligation to be utterly precautious in its manners towards a nation it has forced into decades of oppression and despair. While it is obvious that some Korean nationalists are trying to exploit the Japanese guilt, the scars of the Korean people inflicted by the Japanese invaders are genuin and not something you can wipe out by paying a lump sum and apologizing in a rather ambiguous manner.

Don't assume that the policy was the same as that of Western nations. That's Ireland's whole point. Oppression and despair are the result of Western powers' colonies.

Politicians like Park come and go, but the Korean people are there to stay and I have no doubt that they sooner or later would be able to properly make their peace with the Japanese people if there'd be a consistent, long-term and sincere attempt to reconciliate from the Japanese side.

Not necessary for Korean version of their history is so distorted that unless they actually allow such books by Ireland to be translated and taught, this nonsense would stop.

4% per annum GNP growth, double the population and life expectancy in just 30+ years, it's an accomplishment that should be mentioned but these are whitewashed by both Japan and Korea.

As Ireland also states,

"So, with reference to Korea, there can be found in its history under Japanese rule instances of the abuse of power, of official incompetence, to some extent of corruption; but whether or not Korea has on the whole been well governed can be determined only from a study of the available data. From such a study, which has occupied me for more than three years, and of which the results are presented in this volume, I have formed the opinion that Korea is today infinitely better governed than it ever was under its own native rulers, that it is better governed than most self-governing countries, that it is as well governed as any of the British, American, French, Dutch, and Portuguese dependencies which I have visited, and is better governed than most of them, having in view as well the cultural and economic development of the people as the technique of administration."

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The results speaks for themselves.

Which result are you talking about? The impoverished, devastated and divided Korea of post WW2?

Not necessary for Korean version of their history is so distorted that unless they actually allow such books by Ireland to be translated and taught, this nonsense would stop.

nigelboy, you seem to not even notice that the book you are promoting is written by a proponent of the colonial system, someone who doesn't care about basic human rights and who was in a questionable position even then back in the 1920ies. It apparently completely misses out important facts and surely wasn't even considered a scientifically valuable work at that time it was written.

That you value such a reactionary and latent racist book from the 1920ies tells us more about you, and the Japanese ultra right-wingers who try to promote it, then about Korean history, nigelboy.

The book would never be and has never been quoted by any serious postcolonial historian without critically reflecting its completely outdated pro-colonial racist stance. Only right-wing Japanese pseudohistorians are naiv enough to try to use it for propaganda purposes as it supports their supremacist narrative.

Forced to serve? No.

Forced to serve as forced laborers, yes, of course. Forced and coerced to serve as prostitutes for the Japanese military, yes, of course.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Which result are you talking about? The impoverished, devastated and divided Korea of post WW2?

Those are consequences as a result of Japanese leaving the peninsula. Don't know why you would put that there.

nigelboy, you seem to not even notice that the book you are promoting is written by a proponent of the colonial system, someone who doesn't care about basic human rights and who was in a questionable position even then back in the 1920ies. It apparently completely misses out important facts and surely wasn't even considered a scientifically valuable work at that time it was written.

What is this 'basic human rights' that you speak of?

That you value such a reactionary and latent racist book from the 1920ies tells us more about you, and the Japanese ultra right-wingers who try to promote it, then about Korean history, nigelboy.

Debating the merits and demerits of colonial legacy is not a taboo. There are studies about them even today.

The book would never be and has never been quoted by any serious postcolonial historian without critically reflecting its completely outdated pro-colonial racist stance. Only right-wing Japanese pseudohistorians are naiv enough to try to use it for propaganda purposes as it supports their supremacist narrative.

What is this 'racist' stance that you speak of. It appears you're just wishing such stance exists when the book merely analyzes the development of a state.

Forced to serve as forced laborers, yes, of course. Forced and coerced to serve as prostitutes for the Japanese military, yes, of course.

You are again picturing the Western style colonies to make your blanket statement. Japanese government did not force anything of that nature that you speak of. If there was any force, it's done by the individuals. Stop playing this silly game.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Those are consequences as a result of Japanese leaving the peninsula. Don't know why you would put that there.

Nope, those were the consequences of Japanese coming to the peninsula. When the Japanese left Korea the disaster had already struck as a result of Japanese colonialization and war aggression.

Funny way of trying to turn history upside down.

I wouldn't be surprised if you start telling us next that the Japanese military was on a humanitarian mission to save mankind and that the US meanly prevented this heroic attempt.

What is this 'basic human rights' that you speak of?

Freedom and equality to start with. During the Japanese colonial era Koreans had no freedom to decide on their own fate and were not equal to Japanese who ruled and oppressed them.

While Korea did see economic growth during the Japan colonial rule the overwhelming part of the profit went directly into Japanese hands. The annexation of Korea was by no means a Japanese philanthropic undertaking, but part of a strategy to become more powerful and build up a belligerent empire.

What is this 'racist' stance that you speak of.

Ireland's presumption that being ruled and oppressed by Japanese was good for Koreans is a rather supremacist view of events.

Inherent racism also lies in the fact that Ireland says Korea was "developed under the wise and sympathetic rule" of the Japanese military governors in a way that Koreans couldn't have achieved themselves. If you say that one ethnicity knows better what is good for another ethnicity it is suppressing I would call this latent racism.

Stop playing this silly game.

It is not a silly game to state what a large majority of international historians take for granted: that the Japanese forced Korean laborers to support their war economy and that henchmen coerced thousands of Korean women into becoming prostitutes for the Japanese military by order of the Japanese military and also trafficked those women with the active support of the Imperial Japanese Navy.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Nope, those were the consequences of Japanese coming to the peninsula. When the Japanese left Korea the disaster had already struck as a result of Japanese colonialization and war aggression.

"It is true that at the time Japan annexed Korea in 1910, the actual conditions of life in the Peninsula were extremely bad. This was not due, however, to any lack of inherent intelligence and ability in the Korean race, but to the stupidity and corruption which for five hundred years had, almost continuously, characterized the government of the Korean dynasty, and to the existence during that period of a royal court which maintained throughout Korea a system of licensed cruelty and corruption."

Freedom and equality to start with. During the Japanese colonial era Koreans had no freedom to decide on their own fate and were not equal to Japanese who ruled and oppressed them.

"Such was the misrule under which the Koreans had suffered for generation after generation that all incentive to industry, thrift, and social progress had been destroyed, because none of the common people had been allowed to enjoy the fruits of their own efforts." 

While Korea did see economic growth during the Japan colonial rule the overwhelming part of the profit went directly into Japanese hands. The annexation of Korea was by no means a Japanese philanthropic undertaking, but part of a strategy to become more powerful and build up a belligerent empire.

"The situation thus created is familiar to all students of colonial government. If the local administration builds roads, erects schools, and so on, it is wrong, because the motive is base; if it fails to do these things it is wrong, because it is the obvious duty of an imperial ruler to confer such benefits upon a dependency. So also in relation to developing the resources of a dependency; if the sovereign power invests money in the colony, it is wrong because all it amounts to is capitalist exploitation; if it does not invest money in the colony, it is wrong because the failure to do so reflects a determination to keep the people poor and weak in the interest of an easy domination; if it employs natives in the government service it is wrong because such a policy tends to weaken nationalist sentiment; if it fails to do so it is wrong because such a course discloses the purpose of making the colony the happy hunting ground of imperial officials."

It is not a silly game to state what a large majority of international historians take for granted: that the Japanese forced Korean laborers to support their war economy and that henchmen coerced thousands of Korean women into becoming prostitutes for the Japanese military by order of the Japanese military and also trafficked those women with the active support of the Imperial Japanese Navy.

There was no 'order'. If so, present one for that the 'holy grail' that you and many who make this accusations have yet to provide. Otherwise, stop playing this game.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Reading your last post, nigelboy, I get a quite clear idea about the I-know-better-what-is-good-for-you supremacist worldview that lies at the core of all colonialism. Luckily that part of human history didn't succeed.

'holy grail'

If you are looking for a 'holy grail' you might want to go to Hollywood. For historians it is enough to look at the abundant evidence to know what had happened and who was responsible.

If there's somebody who desperately needs some kind of 'holy grail' to change the worlds view on Japanese atrocities during WW2 it is the deniers like you.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Reading your last post, nigelboy, I get a quite clear idea about the I-know-better-what-is-good-for-you supremacist worldview that lies at the core of all colonialism. Luckily that part of human history didn't succeed.

But it did.

If you are looking for a 'holy grail' you might want to go to Hollywood. For historians it is enough to look at the abundant evidence to know what had happened and who was responsible.

In which you failed to show a single evidence. All you've done is repeat such phrase to deflect your shortcomings that you have yet to submit a single evidence to provide "by order of the Japanese military "

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

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