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S Korean victims of Japan forced labor accuse Seoul of rushing compensation

36 Comments
By Hyonhee Shin

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More sour grapes! The first round of compensation was paid over 40 years ago but the Korean government at the time out the money into infrastructure instead of passing it on to the victims. These people need to check their own history and blame their own government for not receiving compensation. They need to stop trying to bleed Japan for money that was already paid to them.

16 ( +18 / -2 )

Lim Jae-sung, a lawyer for several victims, said the office of President Yoon Suk-yeol and the foreign ministry are forcing the proposal despite the backlash, in order to expedite its efforts to improve ties and have a summit with Japan.

The survivors are all old and they need to get their just awards as soon as possible, regardless of the source of funds. But these younger lawyers and activists would rather perpetuate the issue for their own benefit rather than the actual survivors'.

12 ( +17 / -5 )

Korea needs to move on.

Little can be gained by looking at the bad things done by our ancestors, beyond taking steps to avoid them in the future and not holding the children of the people in power at the time directly accountable. The people who did and ordered the terrible actions should have been held accountable during their lifetimes, not their children.

10 ( +15 / -5 )

Makes one wonder if they are NK shills, they obviously don’t want to benefit their own country. Or are these lawyers doing it for politically motivated reasons? Coaching their ancient clients to be deliberately obstructive, while hiding behind a facade of moral rectitude?

9 ( +15 / -6 )

So after such a long time, the governments come to a solution but people still complain that "they rushed the compensation."

The South Korean government unveiled a plan last month to compensate the victims through its own public foundation - instead of using funds from Japanese companies, sparking an outcry from some victims and their families.

So... they don't want compensation. What they really want is retribution.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

It doesn't matter what Korean administration you talk too. All of them are corrupt, just like Lee Jae-myung, The guy who almost became president instead of Yoon, now getting ready for jail.

This is a complete repeat, recycle of same old Korean tactics and complaints.

2015 Comfort Women agreement, more then 70% of Women wanted the agreement, deal was signed. Yet in 2017, a new PM Moon administration destroyed the deal.

If you listen to Korean Logic, then the 1965 agreement doesn't cover anything. When in fact it was supposed to cover everything! No lines left for Korean to come later and complain, ask for more. 1965 agreement took 15 years to be signed and approved by both countries. Yet 15 years wasn't enough either. That wasn't rushed, yet Korea still complaining about it.

8 ( +17 / -9 )

S Korean victims of Japan forced labor accuse Seoul of rushing compensation

Rushing it? Its taken 78 years….

“For public reasons they're saying the victims are old and the issue has not been resolved for too long, but I think they're pushing to normalize relations with Japan by ending the dispute and make it a political legacy,"

I’m not sure I understand why this would be a bad thing. They ARE old, it HAS taken too long and normalizing relations and ending the dispute sounds great to me.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

but I think they're pushing to normalize relations with Japan 

How dare they try and seek solutions ay? The nerve!

8 ( +8 / -0 )

If the government presses ahead to pay compensation on behalf of the companies, the lawyers would fight to prove its invalidity, he said.

Might find it hard since the treaty says compensation was paid to the Korean government to pay out to victims.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

Yang Geum-deok, who said she was coaxed by a Japanese educator to go to Japan at age 14 and forced to work for Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, said she will never take any money without an apology.

Sure she can say anything she wants and anyway she wants as there's nothing to prove her telling truths. The same old tactics without any third parties' testimonies just like cases of Comfort women, which, by the way, are being proven as all lies piled up on lies these days. No female on the Peninsula were mobilized by the law. All those Korean female who moved to Japan were volunteers for the jobs. There's no way she didn't know she had to work at the factory/farm before she left the peninsula. The same old disgusting tactics.

There's case for different Korean women girl whose testimony was disclosed at the court.

1992年の釜山従軍慰安婦・女子勤労挺身隊公式謝罪等請求訴訟(最高裁棄却)では原告3人が東京麻糸紡績沼津工場に派遣された女子勤労挺身隊だった。1997年にはじまった東京麻糸紡績沼津工場朝鮮人女子勤労挺身隊公式謝罪等請求訴訟(東麻裁判)では判決で事実認定はなされなかった(最高裁棄却)。

そのほか、当時隊員だった金文善はインタビューで東京麻糸紡績の求人に応募した動機について次のように述べている[37]。

「東京麻糸に韓国の監督さんがいて、その人が巨済島に募集にきたんです。前から、そこへ韓国の女の人がいっぱい働きに行ってたんですね。私のいとこの姉さんも行って、何年かしたらもどってきたの。そしたら、きれいな洋服着て、頭もちゃんとして、皮靴なんてはいてたんです。羨ましくて、『ああ、私も日本へ行きたい』って、思ったわけ。それで、日本へ行きたいもんだから、監督に会いに城浦(ソンポ)って町まで行ったわけ。そこの旅館みたいなところには、山奥からみんな集まってきていたんです。みんな、そこに泊まっただけでも嬉しくて、もう田舎には帰りたくない、そのまま、すぐにでも日本に行きたいなんて言ってました。

See? Like Comfort Women cases, there's no such process called fact-checking in Korean justice once defendants are Japan/Japanese companies.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Before makes judgments......

The Japan-Korea Dispute Over the 1965 Agreement

In fact, the agreement makes the path to resolution quite clear.

https://thediplomat.com/2020/10/the-japan-korea-dispute-over-the-1965-agreement/

Under the agreement, Korea received $300 million from Japan, as full and final settlement for claims between states, claims between one state and the individuals of the other, and claims among the individuals of the states, including those specified in Article IV (a) of the 1951 San Francisco Peace Treaty. Private companies were also considered individuals for the purposes of the agreement.

However political interpretation still seems to be a means to undermine any possibility for future generations to move on

6 ( +7 / -1 )

 Heck, the Cairo Declaration(aka Japan's terms of surrender) makes it clear the allies considered Koreans illegally occupied people.

Heck. You never stop posting just like a laughing stock. IF IT WAS ILLEGAL、how come did A Reconsideration of the Annexation of Korea 3 times in 2001 = Official Int'l Conference DIDNOT CONCLUDE LIKE THAT ? Huh?

5 ( +7 / -2 )

There is no harm, in fact I would suggest that opinionating/commenting on JT threads/forum can enlighten and healthy debate should be welcomed.

This route cannot be said or extended to Governments that have undertaken to restore relations through treaty law.

Treaty on Basic Relations. Signed at Tokyo, on 22 June 1965 Official texts: Japanese, Korean 

https://treaties.un.org/doc/Publication/UNTS/Volume%20583/volume-583-I-8471-English.pdf

There are means/protocols to resolve disputes that must be adhered to without question, cannot be resolved in domestic courts, or determine what action subject to interpretation.

The Treaty dispute administrative procedure, guidelines are enshrined in international law and have to be followed.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

The survivors are all old and they need to get their just awards as soon as possible, regardless of the source of funds. But these younger lawyers and activists would rather perpetuate the issue for their own benefit rather than the actual survivors'.

OssanAmerica comment captures the conundrum, and highlights the means for both governments to resolve the political disputes through independent arbitration, stipulated within the signed treaty.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Of course they are not happy, Korea don't want the problem resolved they just want to keep being the victim.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

But.......Yuri Kageyama said:

That dark chapter in Japan’s history, when hundreds of thousands of people were brought from the Korean Peninsula and other Asian nations to work in logging, in mines, on farms and in factories as forced labor, lives on as a modern legacy in the companies that came to dominate the Japanese economy after World War II.

Would you like to try again?

Japan’s legacy of forced labor haunts ties with neighbors

https://apnews.com/article/world-war-ii-tokyo-forced-labor-asia-international-news-9e116e397c4bb2a5064d4c5778ac22c3

What about Yuri Kageyama, just one of counterclockwise journalists? How come she hasn't updated her reports on comfort women issues any longer despite knowing recent counter-movements by Korean academia accusing all those fabrications by Chong Dae Hyup/Yuji Hosaka, a bunch of liers? Sure she knows what's happening inside Korea, in front of Japan embassy these days,

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Headline: S Korean victims of Japan forced labor accuse Seoul of rushing compensation

Yang Geum-deok, who said she was coaxed by a Japanese educator to go to Japan at age 14 and forced to work for Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, said she will never take any money without an apology.

"I worked my butt off there but came home without receiving a penny or any apology," she said. "I want an apology before I die."

Alternative headline: South Korean victims want Japan to take full accountability for forced labor

3 ( +18 / -15 )

Open-mindedToday  08:25 am JST

Forced labor = "slavery"

Wrong. The Mobilization laws included both Japanese and Koreans (who were Japanese nationals at the time) and they were paid.

3 ( +11 / -8 )

There was no international law/rule THEN. ALL legal/illegal disputes are nonsense, just ex post-fact law by the winners. Check what a Indian rep mentioned against all these craps! Buddy. ASK US and other allies. Unless they firmly respond, you are just a laughing stock

3 ( +6 / -3 )

This was already resolved in 1965. The Korean government already agreed and received compensation. If Korean citizens aren’t happy, they should work it out with their government.

I spend a lot of time in Korea for work and even young people there are so racist against Japan and have clearly been educated on a lot of Korean propaganda. It’s really too bad they all live in the past.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

open-minded,

All people under the Mobilization Laws were compensated. Note that the action brought in the South Korean Court is for "forced labor" and no claim of "slavery" has ever been made. And the survivors, activists and lawyers know infinitely more about the subject than you do.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

To begin with, do these Koreans have even one piece of evidence that they were treated badly in Japan? Like the comfort women, Korea seems to be a country that can win in court without a single piece of evidence.

kenshin_u..................Like the journals and records of Japanese personnel admitting to carrying out such crimes to them and comfort women.

I just gave everyone a link up top!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

What about Yuri Kageyama, just one of counterclockwise journalists? How come she hasn't updated her reports on comfort women issues any longer despite knowing recent counter-movements by Korean academia accusing all those fabrications by Chong Dae Hyup/Yuji Hosaka, a bunch of liers? Sure she knows what's happening inside Korea, in front of Japan embassy these days,

Some people have confirmed it!

Care to explain your confusion about the subject?

"Responses to Slave Labor in Japan and the United States"

https://scholarship.law.cornell.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=&httpsredir=1&article=3026&context=clr

KennyG...........Care to respond? None of you posting in defense of Japan has provided one piece of evidence to contradict all the evidence that has been shown to corroborate the attrocities committed by Japan.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Forced labor = "slavery"

0 ( +11 / -11 )

Update yourself more with SK news. Get to know how badly SK has been polluted by NK spies and NK controlling labor unions.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

They are everywhere especially in media, not to mention, in Japan, as much as VaNK is considered to be a just a baby.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

To begin with, do these Koreans have even one piece of evidence that they were treated badly in Japan? Like the comfort women, Korea seems to be a country that can win in court without a single piece of evidence.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

South Korea over the past 10 years has pushed itself into a corner, smaller and smaller each and every year.

From thinking they are above Japan, to slowly falling back in line in the 3rd place.

You tried to play a better hand of cards then you actually have in your hands! Your Moonie Moon tried hard! It's exactly as you elected the most anti-Japan person you could find in South Korea without attacking Japan physically..... they almost tried that too, using S.Korean radars to target Japanese planes.

What was the outcome to South Korean anti-Japan agenda?? We find out Japan holds more cards then South Korea! We find out without Japan first Island Chain S.Korea cannot exist, not just USA assistance, but Japan will become more and more important as time passes!

We find out Korean Supreme Court can't do anything without government approval. More of a scare tactic, intimidation to get Japan to give in to Korean demands.

S.Korea flexing hard, just to back down in the last 50 minutes just like Lee with GSOMIA termination. When people change their mind in the last 50 minutes before time expires, tells you a lot about Korean tactics, Squid Games at work.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Forced labor = "slavery"

Yes, something that was very common is the West. Was it not?

-3 ( +8 / -11 )

> ReasonandWisdomNipponToday  08:23 am JST

It doesn't matter what Korean administration you talk too. All of them are corrupt, just like Lee Jae-myung, The guy who almost became president instead of Yoon, now getting ready for jail.

You might be right,but on the other hand I wouldn't say that their Japanese LDP counterpart is an example of virtue,they are as corrupted as the Korean administration.

-5 ( +5 / -10 )

Hey Ossan,

Japan took three years to plan the abduction of over 40,000 people from China. 17 On March 19, 1940, the Japanese Ministry of Commerce and Industry convened a meeting to discuss the possibility of employing "coolies," or Chinese workers, to compensate for domestic labor shortages. 18 Representatives from several corporations-including Mitsubishi Mining Enterprises, Mitsui Mining and Forestry, and Hokkaido Coalmining and Shipping-also attended the meeting. 19 The proposal they drafted clearly envisioned a role for the Japanese army in recruiting and transporting the laborers toJapan. 20 Thus, the Japanese government, army, and private sector participated from the very inception of the slave-labor campaign.

This does not sound like employment to me.

Once captured, the Chinese were brought to concentration camps set up in China and subsequently sent in cargo ships toJapan. 31 From there, they were dispatched to one of 135 worksites throughout the archipelago. 3 2 According to a report drawn up after the war by the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA), 3 3 Chinese laborers engaged in four basic types of labor:

Care to explain your confusion about the subject?

"Responses to Slave Labor in Japan and the United States"

https://scholarship.law.cornell.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=&httpsredir=1&article=3026&context=clr

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

Ossan

All people under the Mobilization Laws were compensated. Note that the action brought in the South Korean Court is for "forced labor" and no claim of "slavery" has ever been made. And the survivors, activists and lawyers know infinitely more about the subject than you do.

LOL!

Koreans, were conscripted into labor from 1944 to 1945 by the National Mobilization Law. About 670,000 of them were taken to Japan, where about 60,000 died between 1939 and 1945 due mostly to exhaustion or poor working conditions. Many of those taken to Karafuto Prefecture (modern-day Sakhalin) were trapped there at the end of the war, stripped of their nationality and denied repatriation by Japan; they became known as the Sakhalin Koreans. The total deaths of Korean forced laborers in Korea and Manchuria for those years is estimated to be between 270,000 and 810,000.

Because Japan made it legal does not mean it was not "slave labor." Being given a place to stay and food to eat, and working long hours with not being able to leave means "slavery." I guess the "comfort women" were also legal volunteers, right? It was not called "slavery" in the courts, too!

I just quoted to reports from researchers and lawyers who know more than the both of us.

Where is your evidence?

-9 ( +3 / -12 )

@OssanAmerica

Wrong. The Mobilization laws included both Japanese and Koreans (who were Japanese nationals at the time) and they were paid.

But.......Yuri Kageyama said:

That dark chapter in Japan’s history, when hundreds of thousands of people were brought from the Korean Peninsula and other Asian nations to work in logging, in mines, on farms and in factories as forced labor, lives on as a modern legacy in the companies that came to dominate the Japanese economy after World War II.

Would you like to try again?

Japan’s legacy of forced labor haunts ties with neighbors

https://apnews.com/article/world-war-ii-tokyo-forced-labor-asia-international-news-9e116e397c4bb2a5064d4c5778ac22c3

Slavery!

-10 ( +4 / -14 )

@Garthgoyle

the governments come to a solution

It's not a solution because the plaintiffs have rejected it. Remember, the Yoon administration's proposal has no legal standing. To have a legal standing, it must be passed as a law by the parliament but it can't be passed because the Democratic party with a supermajority oppose Yoon's proposal, backs plaintiff's solution of liquidating Japanese assets.

The only legally acceptable solution is the liquidation of seized Japanese assets to compensate the plaintiffs.

-11 ( +3 / -14 )

@OssanJapan

Wrong. The Mobilization laws included both Japanese and Koreans (who were Japanese nationals at the time) and they were paid.

The legal status of Koreans were illegally occupied people just like Palestinians and Ukrainians under Russian occupation. Heck, the Cairo Declaration(aka Japan's terms of surrender) makes it clear the allies considered Koreans illegally occupied people.

Cairo Declaration of 1943

"The aforesaid three great powers, mindful of the enslavement of the people of Korea, are determined that in due course Korea shall become free and independent."

Just as how it is illegal for Israel to conscript Palestinians and Russia conscript Ukrainians, it was also illegal for Imperial Japan to conscript Koreans under occupation.

they need to get their just awards as soon as possible, regardless of the source of funds.

There aren't in it for money, but to get the justice served.

-12 ( +5 / -17 )

If the government presses ahead to pay compensation on behalf of the companies, the lawyers would fight to prove its invalidity, he said.

This is why Kishida administration cannot cut a deal with Yoon's administration for a resolution, the Japanese government must negotiate with forced laborers directly to prevent asset liquidation.

And these lawyers aren't doing it for money, they are the Moon Jae In kind of "human rights" lawyers working for free to fight what they perceive as "evil", namely the Japanese government and corporations in this case.

-15 ( +8 / -23 )

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