politics

Taiwan threatens to call off Japan art loan in poster row

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I think I have to support Tauwan on this one. The name of their museum is the name of their museum. If you can't use their name for whatever reason, then don't borrow the artifacts. Really, in this time of tension with China, it's surprising Japan would let such a great chance to annoy them slip by...

9 ( +11 / -2 )

Considering Taiwan's long-term, and well-tested commitment to maintaining good relations with Japan, for Taiwan to do this, you know that Japan really has to work harder on its diplomacy.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

The Japanese museum should and is required to use the correct museum name which can also involve copyrights on certain items and names. Its a simply matter to fix.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

http://focustaiwan.tw/news/aipl/201406200043.aspx

"The NPM demands that all posters and publicity materials on the exhibition that are not marked 'National' be removed by midnight Saturday. There is no room for negotiation," NPM director Feng Ming-chu said.

The Tokyo National Museum, where the show is to take place, said that it has followed the agreement to use the full name, but it has no control over the media sponsors, because freedom of the press is involved.

Under the agreement signed between the two sides, Taiwan will not shoulder any costs because the show could not be opened as scheduled or because the show ends earlier than planned.

The Presidential Office also demanded an immediate correction in a strongly worded news release, threatening that the NPM will cancel all activities related to the show, and the first lady will not attend the opening ceremony, if the problem is not resolved.

President Ma Ying-jeou said that "the National Palace Museum" is the only official name of the museum, and it will be unacceptable to both the government and people if national dignity is compromised because of cultural exchanges.

Tokyo did what they were supposed to do. They do not control the press.

President Ma thinks Taiwan is a part of China. He is against Taiwan being independent. This is just to make points with China by beating Japan.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I suspect the Tokyo National Museum has ambitions on borrowing Chinese artifacts.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Tokyo did what they were supposed to do. They do not control the press.

Sometimes these stories are incomplete, but if the problem is with the promotional posters, that is not a free press issue. The posters may come for media sponsors, evidently, but I haven't seen a museum yet that doesn't have input into how its shows are being promoted. This is advertising, not free journalism. I'm sure they can put a lot of pressure on sponsors to change the posters.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

You would think with Japan trying to instigate anger in China at every step they would recognize Taiwan as an independent nation already. That said, even if they refuse to do so, a name is a name, and changing it based on politics is stupid.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I watch/ read news from both Tokyo and Taipei and my conclusion is that the only problem is Tokyo National Museum didn't keep their promise of signed agreement to use wording "“national ”. Both sides agree that no people can control political problem but the bottom line is you have to do what agreement said!

The Tokyo National Museum said that it has followed the agreement to use the full name, but it has no control over the media sponsors, because freedom of the press is involved.

@oldsanno: It is a simple lie by Tokyo National Museum! Taipei already agreed that" no control over media... " but can you explain why exhibition ticket printed by TNM itself didn't show the wording " national..." ? So please don't mix this problem with other political issues! it's purly a problem of Tokyo National Museum's CREDIT !

1 ( +1 / -0 )

oldsanno,

Please learn how to read properly. You are completely confusing the matter.

President Ma, Taiwan's pro-independence party, as well as the nation of Taiwan want Japanese Press to recognize the wording that means National of Taiwan, if I'm not mistaken from the article. Which means Taiwanese want Japanese Press to recognize Taiwan as an independent nation instead of NOT an independent nation as Japanese press describe the name of that museum.

Therefore the parties that I have to question are the Japanese Press such as NHK...etc. on why are they are pro-China instead of pro-Taiwan on recognizing the sovereignty of Taiwan.

And the ads from the exhibits of the museum are paid for by the museum. The Japanese should honor the wishes of the Tokyo museum unless its the Tokyo museum that refuses to recognize the proper name of Taiwan's museum.

Either way, its Japan's side that messed up by not honoring the terms of the exhibit. Taiwan has every right to retract the exhibits from Tokyo.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Sir_EdgarJun. 23, 2014 - 01:10AM JST The Japanese have a habit of changing names for other countries.

Like we all call Japan,...Nihon or Nippon? And we use Korea instead of Hanguk?

For example, they changed the order of the 2002 World Cup from "Korea-Japan World Cup" to "Japan-Korea World >Cup". It took an order from FIFA to make them stop printing posters and tickets with Japan first. They also encouraged the use of "Korea" over "Corea" so Japan could come first in any list of countries. Sound petty? Tis Japanese way.

Can you provide a link to substantiate this? I agree it is petty. In fact it is so petty that it could only have come from Koreans. Korea with a "K" is English. not Japanese who last called it Chosen. When the post 1945 South Korean government created Dae Han Ming Guk. they didn't call it Republic of Corea, they used Republic of Korea. Your efforts to insult Japan are really quite pathetic.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

For Taiwanese, this is a issue of CREDIT, not political! In Taiwan, no matter people like Japanese or not, they normally think japanese friendly and trustable, when Taiwanese sign agreement with Japanese, they thought Japanese will do it without doubt, and generally Japanese kept their promise in the past. What japanese did in this matter (even small group of people sometimes represent the whole country) really a eye-opener for Taiwanese. By the way, if japanese try to blame everything to politics instead of humanbeing's basic credit, fine, Taiwanese don't mind people of that kind!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

You are right, UN does not recognize Taiwan as a country.

In the UN, as of last year, 21 countries plus the Holy See recognize the ROC, and have diplomatic relations with it. Most of the other countries don't want to have the PRC angry with them, or to jeopardize trade with them, though some also agree with the PRC's reasoning.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Taipei is a capital city of the country, Taiwan, Taipei is not the name of the country. Highball7 wrote well.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Depending on the convenience Formosa is sometimes Taiwan as a country, but the PROC likes to think it is still part of its territory. The article here states 'Some of the Tokyo posters referred to the “Taipei Palace Museum” rather than the “National Palace Museum”. National dignity? It's very confusing. The art was stolen from mainland China, but that China is probably also grateful for saving the objects from Mao's culture destroyers - of course they won't admit it. What's the fuss about the name anyway. The National Palace Museum is in Taipei. Chow Mei ching making demands sounds so familiar. Does she want to educate the Japanese on trivialities or be proud of the treasures her country (?) has saved?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The Japanese have a habit of changing names for other countries.

For example, they changed the order of the 2002 World Cup from "Korea-Japan World Cup" to "Japan-Korea World Cup". It took an order from FIFA to make them stop printing posters and tickets with Japan first.

They also encouraged the use of "Korea" over "Corea" so Japan could come first in any list of countries.

Sound petty? Tis Japanese way.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Sometimes these stories are incomplete

AFP story is incomplete so I linked to a local news site with more info.

but if the problem is with the promotional posters

That is the only problem. The Tokyo Museum posters were done per their agreement with Taiwan.

I'm sure they can put a lot of pressure on sponsors to change the posters.

Try to twist it all you want. Sponsors have the money. So what "pressure" should they use. We won't take your dirty money unless you do exactly what we say.

Advertising/press reprts by others is not controlled by Tokyo museum.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Ma's party KMT is not pro-independent. Ma is doing everything in his power to rejoin with china. The DPP party is the party of independence. Ma's approval rate is about 10%...

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Toshiko, in some circles, Taiwan is a province (or some such part) of China, therefore not considered a country. Just saying.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

@brotokyoJUN. 22, 2014 - 10:53PM JST Toshiko, in some circles, Taiwan is a province (or some such part) of China, therefore not considered a country. Just saying

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You are right, UN does not recognize Taiwan as a country. However, it is a shame Japanese people lose chances to review such valuable artifacts. .

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

@Sir Edgar: They also encouraged the use of "Korea" over "Corea" :

It was Chosen before changed to Kou-rai (the ancient name for Korea.) So, that was reason Japan use Korea instead of Chosen, Thanks to enlightetening. There maybe many more cases I'd bet. '

Taiwan has been called Taiwan. This artifact sure came from mainland China. Taiwan people taught Japanese pottery and other arts. via trading in Nagasaki.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

so Japan will bow to Taiwan's demand or cancel museum amusement altogether?

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

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