politics

U.S. welcomes Japan's new cabinet

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The United States backed a reshuffle of the Japanese cabinet in which Prime Minister Shinzo Abe named five women to his governing team on Wednesday.

That's nice. I'm sure the Japanese can sleep easily knowing America approves...

5 ( +5 / -0 )

The efficacy and appropriateness of a cabinet should be judged by its efficacy and appropriateness, not on the statistical breakdown of its constituent members. I agree that there is a need for politics to be more balanced. So Abe-san should be complemented on his attempts, perhaps. But at the end of the day, it comes down to what these new appointees actually DO for us the people. On that count, I think I shall just wait and see.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The US has good reasons to endorse Abe’s new reshuffle. In part, Abe has come to realize the Japan’s economic growth would be the key to raise Japan above the crowds, not those fiery rhetoric and bellicose nationalistic bravado.

Besides of more women put in the newly “renovated” cabinet, Abe also appointed Sadakazu Tanigaki as new secretary-general of LDP and Toshihiro Nikai as Executive Council Chairman of LDP.

For people who don’t know the intrinsic of Japan’s party politics, both Sadakazu Tanigaki and Toshihiro Nikai belong to fractions of “China-friendly”. The new appointments show Washington’s hands at work. (Obama admin has made things very clear to Abe that Americans want to see Japan to be the catalyst to improve ties with its big neighbor). In fact, given unfolding crisis in Ukraine, the US itself is looking for a new way to improve its own tie with China as well. For instance, this week Obama sends National Security Adviser Susan Rice on her way to China to collect inputs for his upcoming summit with leaders of Chinese regime.

Keep fingers crossed, the effects of all of the new reshuffles remain to be seen as Abe is facing serious issues at home and abroad. Hopefully, Japan would not slip into deflation which would affect world economy.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

@EthanWilber If you think this is all to improve ties between the US and China, I've got an island to sell you. The US could not stop Abe from visiting Yasukuni, after all.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

If Japan isn't really an independent country, how come the people here say they are free, whereas the people in Tibet, Xinjiang, and dozens of activists and lawyers in the PRC say they are not? I would certainly choose Japan to live, of the two.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@scipantheistSEP. 05, 2014 - 01:45PM JST If Japan isn't really an independent country, how come the people here say they are free, whereas the people in Tibet, Xinjiang, and dozens of activists and lawyers in the PRC say they are not? I would certainly choose Japan to live, of the two.

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Japan is not going to follow rumors of some people or country.

Is Japan not independent country? Which country own Japan?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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