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U.N. panel calls for revising Japan-S Korea 'comfort women' deal

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Endless march of time never to die away

2 ( +6 / -4 )

South Korea is very good at lobbying.

-4 ( +7 / -11 )

Japan just needs to understand that compensation isn't the same as hush-money.

-2 ( +7 / -9 )

Having no obligation does not mean it will be hard, If Japan refuses, it will make it hard for Abe agenda. It will be hard for Abe if he wants more involvement in peace keeping causes. Abe desperately want Japan to head a UN Peace Keeping mission so to create more credibility at home for has changes to the constitution. Abe has change his agenda since 2014-15 and now see Japan has future in arm production. Why hasn't, Nissan or Toyota produce any war vehicles ? I assume they would be a big player if they entered that Market but The Japanese constitution does not allow Japan companies to be involve in producing war equipment. This I assume I don't know for a fact. But Abe want more involvement in the UN and refusing this UN request will see any dreams of future arms contract with the UN and NATO deflate. So I see Japan quickly obliging to the UN request.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Japan's going to threaten extortion again over this. Good on the UN for trying to do what's right.

-4 ( +8 / -12 )

Ignore. Korea thinks they can keep making Japan bend over and pay more money. Those days are over.

1 ( +10 / -9 )

You're not fooling anyone but yourself, Japan. You are on the losing end of this issue and it is of your own making. As ye sow so shall ye reap. If you had dealt with this issue decades ago, think of how much further along you'd be on the road to redemption.

0 ( +9 / -9 )

Yep MIJ!

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Decades of Post WWII Korean historical revisionism further stoked by continuous manipulation of the issue by Chong Dae Hyup have resulted in this ""a reality that most of the South Korean people are emotionally unable to accept (the deal)." But nations, like people need credibility if they are to prosper and move forward. Considering that Japan already paid back in 1965, and they did again in 2016, for South Korea to abandon the agreement now would put their degree of credibility on a par with North Korea. Perhaps this means nothing to some but it reflects negatively on the image of the country. The UN committee needs to take full responsibility for attempting to upset an agreement that has taken decades for the two countries to reach, and as if there aren't present day cases affecting people right now that the committee should be concerned about.

0 ( +8 / -8 )

@Ossan: Is Japan any less guilty of historical revisionism than that of what you claim the ROK being?

3 ( +8 / -5 )

This is all nasty politics, and the UN committee has no business sticking its nose into something two countries are trying to absolve. That absolution may not be perfect, and there are undoubtedly hard feelings involved, but Japan and South Korea should be mature enough to go it alone.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

South Korea should then return the money and try to negotiate a new deal.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

OssanAmerica: "Decades of Post WWII Korean historical revisionism further stoked by continuous manipulation of the issue by Japan have resulted in this."

Fixed it for you! But hey, what's stopped you from believing the white-washed history of Japan up to now? You can just pretend my comment never happened.

"Considering that Japan already paid back in 1965, and they did again in 2016, for South Korea to abandon the agreement now would put their degree of credibility on a par with North Korea."

Which would still make it a lot higher than Japan's on this issue, and in any case you need to learn that "hush money" does not mean they have earnestly apologized. Hell, even when former IJA or a politician TRIES to apologize the wingers jump all over it saying "it does not represent the official stance of Japan", but when the same wingers say Koreans are cockroaches or that the women were willing prostitutes, the latter of which you have said many times, the government stays silent, or even states that it is all just propaganda by SK. So, again, far below even the credibility of North Korea even.

-1 ( +7 / -8 )

Doesn't the UN have anything better to do? First send back all the money given by Japan in 1965 and 2016 adjusted to inflation then we can talk about the crimes of people that are already dead.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

It seems that Japan comprehensively better ignore S Korea as well as N Korea and stay away from them. Both seem never fulfill country and country's agreements.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Swift_Justice May 13 08:43 pm JST

@Ossan: Is Japan any less guilty of historical revisionism than that of what you claim the ROK being?

All nations are guilty of some "revisionism" to some extent. But it's really no comparison in that Japan was tried at the International Tribunal for the Fareast after WWII, and all the "atrocities" that were verified and documented were tried and before the entire world. Note that treatment of POWs such as the Death March were included. But no one in Japan is denying any of the charges that were brought at the Tokyo Trials. That a handful of rightwing nationalist nutbags may deny it hardly represents the position of the populace. Books on Imperial Japan's atrocities such as Unit 751 are available in Japanese bookstores, and school textbooks clearly state that Japan conducted a "war of aggression" without any attempt to lay blame elsewhere. The Comfort Women system, a military prostitution system is recognized by the Japanese government.

In contrast, Korea was part of the Japanese Empire from 1910 to 1945, some 240,000 Koreans served in the Imperial Japanese military and made use of the Comfort Stations. Koreans were all granted Japanese citizenship and a great many actually supported being part of Japan, which was far wealthier and economically powerful. Not all, but many. Some Koreans became officers and at least one became a General. Park Chung Hee, the father of the now impeached President Park was himself an officer in the IJA serving in China. Koreans became known for the brutality to POWs and quite a number of them were tried and convicted as class B and C War Criminals at the Tokyo Trials. But South Korea, as soon as WWII ended and Korea was released from Japan as a colony, under Syngman Rhee rewrote history as if Korea had been on the Allied side and was "invaded" by Japan as China and other Asian countries were. This is outright revisionism has been adopted by the South Korean people and the U.S. remains silent in order to maintain our relationship, despite our knowing from actual experience and archived records the role Korea played in WWII. But don't take my word for this, look all this up on your own. It's there for all to see but ignored by the J-haters.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

In contrast, Korea was part of the Japanese Empire from 1910 to 1945, some 240,000 Koreans served in the Imperial Japanese military and made use of the Comfort Stations. Koreans were all granted Japanese citizenship and a great many actually supported being part of Japan, which was far wealthier and economically powerful.....

...So the Japanese never forced Korean women to be sex slaves because technically they were not called Korean, but Japanese. Brilliant!

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

...So the Japanese never forced Korean women to be sex slaves because technically they were not called Korean, but Japanese. Brilliant!

No, Japanese never forced Korean women to be sex slaves because most investigations into the issue concluded that these women chose to be involved in this business of prostitution. The US Army did an inquiry on it in 1945 and came to this conclusion.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

The US Army did an inquiry on it in 1945 and came to this conclusion.

Early in May of 1942 Japanese agents arrived in Korea for the purpose of enlisting Korean girls for "comfort service" in newly conquered Japanese territories in Southeast Asia. The nature of this "service" was not specified but it was assumed to be work connected with visiting the wounded in hospitals, rolling bandages, and generally making the soldiers happy. 

http://www.exordio.com/1939-1945/codex/Documentos/report-49-USA-orig.html

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

even if that happened, there are millions of issues in the world that havent been resolved. The comfort women hace been resolved 2 TIMES.

Adding that for Us Its not that important and doesnt deserve to be put in our textbooks as a separate issue

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

" ThePBot Today 02:01 am JST

In contrast, Korea was part of the Japanese Empire from 1910 to 1945, some 240,000 Koreans served in the Imperial Japanese military and made use of the Comfort Stations. Koreans were all granted Japanese citizenship and a great many actually supported being part of Japan, which was far wealthier and economically powerful.....

...So the Japanese never forced Korean women to be sex slaves because technically they were not called Korean, but Japanese. Brilliant!"

Unfortunately I can't say the same for your unique interpretation. The Comfort Women were employed and on the military payroll. They were a far cry from "sex slaves". That they were military prostitutes is a fact, how they got there is the real issue. The point being made is that Koreans held Japanese citizenship and many volunteered to join the Japanese military, and made use of the Comfort Stations, some actually run by Koreans.

The greater point is that South Korea is guilty off completely re-writing it's history prior to 1945.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

zichi Today 03:06 am JST

The US Army did an inquiry on it in 1945 and came to this conclusion.

"Early in May of 1942 Japanese agents arrived in Korea for the purpose of enlisting Korean girls for "comfort service" in newly conquered Japanese territories in Southeast Asia. The nature of this "service" was not specified but it was assumed to be work connected with visiting the wounded in hospitals, rolling bandages, and generally making the soldiers happy. http://www.exordio.com/1939-1945/codex/Documentos/report-49-USA-orig.html"

Those "Japanese Agents" were most likely Zai-Nichi Koreans, bearing in mind that fluency in Korean would be an absolute requirement for the job, and that since 1910 many Koreans had already emigrated to Japan, as Japanese citizens.

"In wars, soldiers sometimes rape innocent women. To prevent this from happening, the Japanese military used existing brothels in Manchuria as comfort stations in the early 1930s. As it advanced into China and Southeast Asia, more comfort stations were needed. So men in prostitution business recruited women and operated comfort stations in order to meet the increased demand. Japanese businessmen recruited women in Japan. They owned and operated comfort stations employing Japanese women. Korean businessmen recruited women in Korea. They owned and operated comfort stations employing Korean women."

"The Japanese military sent orders (See footnote *7) to comfort station operators not to recruit unwilling women. The Japanese comfort station operators followed the order and only recruited willing women in Japan, but the Korean operators didn't follow the order and recruited both willing prostitutes and unwilling women in Korea. If the Korean operators had followed the order, there wouldn't have been any comfort women issue."

From "Comfort Women of the Empire" was written by Professor Park Yuha of Sejong University in South Korea."

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

OssanAmerica

you choose to ignore the part in the US military document saying they didn't know they would be prostitutes. But since you have quoted the document so many times on JT. I think the military interrogation of just 20 uneducated women who were fleeing a battle field would actually say what the I interrogators would want to hear and probably whatever the women said can't be the situation of the tens of thousands of comfort women. It's just one small slice.

You certainly twist the facts to suit your beliefs. I am sure there were Japanese capable of speaking Korean otherwise it would have been impossible to rule. I don't need a lecture on the comfort women and have read all the available material too.

You quoted 240,000 Koreans who served in the JIA but they were conscripted from 1944 and prior to that the accepted numbers were low. Koreans were not given Japanese nationality. I also hope you are calling me a J-hater because unlike you, I actually live here and make a contribution to the society.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

OssanAmerica

some 240,000 Koreans served in the Imperial Japanese military and made use of the Comfort Stations. Koreans were all granted Japanese citizenship and a great many actually supported being part of Japan. Koreans were all granted Japanese citizenship and a great many actually supported being part of Japan, which was far wealthier and economically powerful. 

National Mobilization Law forced nearly one million Koreans moved to Japan. By 1945 the numbers had increased to two million. In 1946, 1.3 million were repatriated to Korea with 650,000 remaining in Japan. Under the National Mobilization Law, 5,400,000 Koreans conscripted. 670,000 to Japan. 60,000 Korean laborers died in Japan. the total numbers who died from forced labor is estimated between 270,000 and 810,000.

The Japanese Imperial Army didn’t not conscript Koreans until 1944 when the Japanese position in the war was dire. Until that year, Koreans were volunteers but the majority who applied were rejected. In 1943 there were 303,294 applications from Koreans but only 6,300 accepted or 2.1%. Between 1937 and 1945, 242,341 Koreans served in the Japanese Army; 22,182 of them were killed. 

Tens of thousands of Korean women were conscripted to be comfort women in the battlefield brothels. Those women might not have been sex slaves but without doubt they were debt and servitude slaves who were bonded until the debts were earned and repaid.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Three words: Get Over It.

Asia and the world are facing grave and unprecedented problems that will require the cooperation of all nations, and instead they choose to bicker over events of 80 years ago. The results of not getting along and solving current problems together will be a thousand times worse that the problems of the past.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

OssanAmercia

easy enough to read up on the National Mobilization Law. How many forced laborers were sent to Japan. How many died there. How many applications for the JIA and how many rejected. How many Korean conscripted etc etc. Its all available.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

@Ossan:

Thank you of your reply. What part of the U.S. are you in? I am from the Northwest, but am not in the greater Tokyo area.

Now for the part you won't like:

But no one in Japan is denying any of the charges that were brought at the Tokyo Trials. That a handful of rightwing nationalist nutbags may deny it hardly represents the position of the populace.

Except that Abe, his cabinet, and Nippon Kaigi all deny a vast swath of this history. This means that the populace of Japan is effectively denying it because they keep voting these people into power and raise very little if any stink about the revisionism of Abe and friends.

Books on Imperial Japan's atrocities such as Unit 751 are available in Japanese bookstores, and school textbooks clearly state that Japan conducted a "war of aggression" without any attempt to lay blame elsewhere.

Just because there are books in bookstores does not mean the populace ascribes to the views contained within those books. There are a plethora of books in U.S. bookstores claiming the terrorist attacks of 9/11 were perpetrated by the government, but that is hardly the view of the vast majority of Americans.

The Comfort Women system, a military prostitution system is recognized by the Japanese government.

The Japanese government recognizes the Comfort Women system as military prostitution in an attempt to deflect from what it actually was, which the vast majority of intellectually honest people call sexual slavery. Just because you provide a pittance to those you force to do something does not make it a voluntary system of employment.

 Koreans were all granted Japanese citizenship and a great many actually supported being part of Japan, which was far wealthier and economically powerful.

No, Koreans were not granted Japanese citizenship. To this day, Koreans born in Japan whose parents or grandparents did not apply for and receive Japanese citizenship must do so to become Japanese citizens.

But don't take my word for this, look all this up on your own. It's there for all to see but ignored by the J-haters.

I have researched this topic extensively. The vast majority of credible sources completely disagree with your take. Also, being very disappointed that Japan continuously attempts to minimize its responsibility for WWII and twist history to make itself look like the victim is not the same as hating Japan. Please do not conflate the two.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

@Kiyoshi:

even if that happened, there are millions of issues in the world that havent been resolved.

The comfort women hace been resolved 2 TIMES. 

It did happen. Just because there are currently millions of issues in the world does not negate the importance of historical issues. It clearly has not been resolved given it is an issue of contention between Japan and Korea. The fact that you started your post with "even [IF] that happened" speaks volumes.

Adding that for Us Its not that important and doesnt deserve to be put in our textbooks as a separate issue

This is painfully obvious. There reason it is not important for you is because you were not the victims of this horrendous crime. The events you view yourself as victims of - Hiroshima and Nagasaki - are not only in your history textbooks but your English textbooks. You see how that work? If you don't feel you are the victim, it is not important. If you feel you are the victim, it is quite important. This holds true for the victims of Japan's sexual slavery during WWII.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

"zichi May 14 09:31 am JST

OssanAmercia

easy enough to read up on the National Mobilization Law. How many forced laborers were sent to Japan. How many died there. How many applications for the JIA and how many rejected. How many Korean conscripted etc etc. Its all available.

Not sure what you are trying to prove. The National Mobilization Law concerns forced Labor, NOT Comfort women.

"Two hundred thousand was the number of factory workers conscripted. About 150,000 of them were Japanese and 50,000 were Korean. Common misunderstanding in the West "There were 200,000 comfort women" arose because Asahi Shimbun mistook factory workers for comfort women in its August 11th, 1991 article, which inflated the number. The estimates of comfort women numbers vary from 5,000 to 20,000 depending on the historians."

http://scholarsinenglish.blogspot.com/

 That "Between 1937 and 1945, 242,341 Koreans served in the Japanese Army" is your statement. And these Korean men made use of the Comfort Stations, at a reduced rate no less.

"In 1938, the Japanese Army opened its doors to Koreans. Korean members of the Japanese Army initially served in Manchukuo in anti-insurgency roles, but their involvement grew rapidly. By the height of the Pacific War, Koreans served all across the Pacific, and many of them fought for Japan with fierce loyalty. "

http://ww2db.com/country/korea

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

@OssanAmerica

Not sure what you are trying to prove. The National Mobilization Law concerns forced Labor, NOT Comfort women.

Most of the points in all your comments are not connected with the events of the comfort women since you are seeking to defend Imperial Japan in this era and find justifications for their actions even when wrong. Japan are very good at playing victim, like the atomic bombing but less than capable when it needs to admit they were the victimizers. It take would decades before they even tried to admit the atrocities of the war. You stated many Koreans emigrated to Japan and were given Japanese nationality.

By 1939, about 1 million Koreans were in Japan, and under the National Mobilization Law a further 670,000 were conscripted to Japan. None were given Japanese nationality. Under the mobilization law about 5.4 million Koreans were conscripted. The total deaths of Korean forced laborers in Korea and Manchuria was estimated between 270,000 and 810,000.

"Two hundred thousand was the number of factory workers conscripted. About 150,000 of them were Japanese and 50,000 were Korean. Common misunderstanding in the West "There were 200,000 comfort women" arose because Asahi Shimbun mistook factory workers for comfort women in its August 11th, 1991 article, which inflated the number. The estimates of comfort women numbers vary from 5,000 to 20,000 depending on the historians."

Well even putting Asahi Shimbun aside, the numbers for the comfort women vary from 20,000 to 400,000 depending on the historian. I give if the number of Japanese troops of about 5 million are considered then I put the number of comfort women at 50,000+ but I have no idea how many were Japanese, Korean, Chinese, other nations.

“That "Between 1937 and 1945, 242,341 Koreans served in the Japanese Army" is your statement. And these Korean men made use of the Comfort Stations, at a reduced rate no less.”

You keep quoting these figures. Until conscription was introduced in 1944, the number of Koreans serving in the JIA were very low and most of the Korean applications were refused. Koreans were placed in the First Korean Voluntary Unit. In Manchukuo they became the Nando Special Force.

By 1944, 18,000 Koreans were inducted into the army. In 1944 about 200,000 Korean males were conscripted with the total number being 242,341.

I do not know how many comfort women there were, and I'm not sure that point will ever again be clear. What is clear from the available documentation is that most of the Korean comfort women were bond and debt slaves and some of them were not told they would become prostitutes.

I do not know the agreement made between Japan and Korea since I have never seen the agreement so I have no idea what it contains including the removal of the statues.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Zichi, Koreans were Japanese citizens during the colonial period. both on the Korean peninsula and within Japan.

"After decades of intervention in Korean affairs, Japan formally annexed Korea in 1910. Annexation meant that Koreans became subjects of the Japanese Emperor and were considered Japanese nationals by the Japanese government."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Japanese_nationality#Korea

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

@Ossan:

First, a national is not always a citizen.

Second, there is no source cite for that claim on Wikipedia.

Third, this may help you understand:

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2005/04/02/news/japanborn-koreans-live-in-limbo.html

1 ( +3 / -2 )

First, a national is not always a citizen.

Really? I was under the impression they are the same thing. Can you give more info?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"Swift_Justice Today 07:47 pm JST

@Ossan:

First, a national is not always a citizen.

Second, there is no source cite for that claim on Wikipedia."

Swift, that Koreans were of Japanese nationality during the colonial era is a fact. In the 1936 Berlin Olympics the Gold Medal Marathon winner was Son Kitei, (Korean name Son Kee Chung). He was recognized by the Olympic committee as a member of the Japanese delegation and his medal credited to Japan.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Imperial Japan considered the Koreans to be Japanese nationals under the annexed control but not citizens and come 1945 they even lost that so Koreans in Japan were not Korean or Japanese they became foreigners with residence.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Stranger:

The distinction between a national and a citizen is legal. You can read about this distinction under U.S. law here:

https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/legal-considerations/us-citizenship-laws-policies/certificates-of-non-citizen-nationality.html

Ossan:

I stand correct. Thank you for forcing me to continue my research.

Page 69, lines 12 & 13 of the book found at the following link resolves this argument between us in your favor:

https://books.google.co.jp/books?id=yHOvXwy4_oQC&pg=PA61&lpg=PA61&dq=imperial+japanese+citizenship&source=bl&ots=aHaCU7k92g&sig=B2SuSJHKCT2sBxJjmSCpxq-xsUY&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi10aLwxfTTAhXBy7wKHQj7DjEQ6AEIeDAQ#v=onepage&q&f=false

It is important to me that you understand I am not being a sore loser so I do not say the following lightly: Just because Koreans were granted Japanese citizenship during the Japanese occupation of the Korean Peninsula does not evidence that Japan is less guilty of historical revisionism than Korea. Nor does it negate my other arguments.

That said, I do sincerely thank you again for forcing me to continue my research.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@Ossan:

*I stand corrected. Clearly I was not correct.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The distinction between a national and a citizen is legal. You can read about this distinction under U.S. law here:

https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/legal-considerations/us-citizenship-laws-policies/certificates-of-non-citizen-nationality.html

Thanks, that was interesting to read. I learned something new.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Swift noted.

It would be nice if Zichi also recognized that his statement below is totally incorrect.

" zichi May 16 09:43 pm JST

Imperial Japan considered the Koreans to be Japanese nationals under the annexed control but not citizens and come 1945 they even lost that so Koreans in Japan were not Korean or Japanese they became foreigners with residence."

Far too much of the issues between South Korea and Japan are based on false information.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Far too much of the issues between South Korea and Japan are based on false information.

That would include some of the alt-facts in your comments. Never sure why you have a constant need to justify Imperial Japan which was the victimizer and never the victim.

Koreans never had citizenship equal to Japanese and at best were only second class citizens. Hundreds of thousands of forced laborers sent to Japan to work the factories and mines. 10,000 used to dig the caves and tunnels in Matsushiro in Nagano.

From the link provided by Swift_Justice p69

"Although colonial subjects were granted citizenship status and thus, referred to as "children of the emperor" (tenno no sekishi), they were never granted equal status in Japan's hierarchical imperial system. On the contrary, like peasants, the urban poor, the burakumin, the Okinawans, and the Ainu, colonial subjects were part of the imperial family's outer circle who - according to numerous officials, intellectuals, and popular writers - were a "race" apart from the rest of the population. (Weiner 1994b: 259-60). Colonial peoples were principally subjects - and second-class at best - and, thus, ultimately controllable, exploitable, and disposable. Consequently, the problems posed by Koreans and other "inferior" subjects could be controlled with an array of repressive measures and political concessions."

The IJA never forced its own Japanese people to be forced laborers. IJA conscripted 670,000 Korean forced laborers to Japan where about 60,000 died mostly to exhaustion or poor working conditions. Many of those taken to Karafuto Prefecture now Sakhalin were trapped there at the end of the war, stripped of their nationality and denied repatriation by Japan: they became known as the Sakhalin Koreans. The total deaths of Korean forced laborers in Korea and Manchuria is estimated to be between 270,000 and 810,000.

Koreans, along with many other Asians, were experimented on in the infamous Unit 731. There were 250,000 victims of Unit 731.

Therefore I don' think my comment is incorrect and just more of your justifications of the wrong doings of Imperial Japan. Like Japan, you should accept the wrong doings, apologize and move on. The first apology from Japan for its war actions wasn't until 1957, 13 years after the end of the war. There wasn't any apology for Koreans until mid 1965, 20 years after the end of the war.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

OssanAmerica

Zichi, you claimed that Koreans were not Japanese citizens. I have proven you wrong. Going on and on with your J-hating diatribe jumping subjects to obfuscate this fact will not change it, You were wrong. You have also succumbed to telling ME personally to apologize for Japan. I have family who served in the USMC on Guadalcanal. I think you have unmasked yourself.

"your J-hating diatribe jumping subjects"

That's a common reaction from you when we don't agree with your version of Japanese Imperialist history which puts you more akin to the version liked by PM Abe, and the extreme right wing.

But again I will point out to you I have lived in Japan for nearly three decades while you live in America.

Because I don't accept the wrong doings of Imperialist Japan before and during the WWII does not make me a J-hater so please stop with that nonsense.

I don't agree with everything from my own birth country and government especially during the period of its empire or everything it did in WWII, but that does not make me a Brit-hater. Nor do I slavishly follow and agree with everything from America, the country of my parents and a large section of my family but that does not make me an American-hater.

I don't think you should apologize nor any living Japanese but the government needed to give many sincere apologies to all those countries and peoples it victimized but failed to do and generally caused more confusion by them. The majority of South Koreans have rejected the Korean Japanese agreement of Dec 2016.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

OssanAmerica

Zichi, you claimed that Koreans were not Japanese citizens. I have proven you wrong. 

And I have proved to you at best they were second class ones and thought of as being disposable.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

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