politics

Kono backs Suga for prime minister, but still has his eye on top job

30 Comments
By Tim Kelly and Kiyoshi Takenaka

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© Thomson Reuters 2020.

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

30 Comments
Login to comment

"We need to secure our social security, how we are going to provide social security, pensions, medical, childcare. I think that's going to be very important, and that needs to be thoroughly discussed," Kono said.

He will most likely do a better job than Suga. Suga is old school. But Suga will probably gain more support within the party.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

He has to support Suga, he lost the sit up competition, a prerequisite for LDP leadership.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Kono can't do a "Koike" here and jump ahead of the other more "senior" members in the LDP in the "next in line" for the PM. Seeing as how it's other Diet members that vote, and not the public!

Suga has been anointed by Abe and Aso so everyone knows it's now all for show, and people like Kono have to start kissing butt so they can get "prime" ministerial positions in Suga's cabinet.

I wouldn't be surprised one bit if Suga keeps Kono right where he is, and will lean on his expertise in foreign affairs, seeing as how Kono speaks English (sarcasm). Not to mention that Suga is WEAK in issues with foreign affairs and his boss Abe, will guide him on issues like these!

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Secret ballot, one member one vote, fundamentally the most essential elements of any electoral system.

"It is important to contain COVID-19 and at the same time we need to restart the economy," Kono said in an interview with Reuters. "One day I will be the prime minister”

Of course, Japanese Defense Minister Taro Kono will be Prime Minster one day, however only when the role passed from one person to another.

This whole election is a shameful farce, a charade , pure pantomime, control by a handful of faction heavyweight’s in secret.

Japanese Defense Minister Taro Kono was taken to one side, and made aware, in no uncertain terms that Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga is next in line, and to support that decision.

 "We need to secure our social security, how we are going to provide social security, pensions, medical, childcare. I think that's going to be very important, and that needs to be thoroughly discussed," Kono said.

These vital policies have been in perpetual discussion phase for decades, without any concrete proposals, without a clear, transparent, step-by-step methodology for conducting change.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

This whole election is a shameful farce, a charade , pure pantomime, control by a handful of faction heavyweight’s in secret.

IF you can even call it an election. I'm willing to bet Nippon Kaigi decided who would replace Abe even before they allowed him to announce that he would resign.

Japanese Defense Minister Taro Kono was taken to one side, and made aware, in no uncertain terms that Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga is next in line, and to support that decision.

Exactly. I've lived in many countries that PRETEND to have elections where the outcome was pretty much well known, and Japan is no different. This is not a democracy.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

This whole election is a shameful farce, a charade , pure pantomime, control by a handful of faction heavyweight’s in secret.

Hear, hear.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

These vital policies have been in perpetual discussion phase for decades, without any concrete proposals, without a clear, transparent, step-by-step methodology for conducting change.

Well said.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Smart move by Kono. He knows that he does not have the votes in the LDP, so he backs Suga and gets a plum job in the Suga governement. Kishida will do the same.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Trump encourages supporters to try to vote twice"

At least people can vote. Did you actually cast a vote for Suga? Did you?

LOL at your home country.

I'm not American. Funny coming from a poster who previously used the name Caliboy

0 ( +4 / -4 )

This is why countries like Japan shouldn't lecture others on democracy.

The voting system is modelled on the UK's, which is outdated and needs to change to better reflect the population.

Well, I'm glad Kōno showed is true colours before any general election. Obviously, the odds are against Suga's rivals but you don't just give up at the first hurdle and worse, make it easier for the competition. That shows lack of commitment.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Comparatively, I liked Kono. But he never had a chance.

How many of these near-to-the-grave old men need to have their moment in the sun (a return to the 90s PM-rotation scheme?) before someone comes along with real leadership capabilities?

I need a drink.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Hedging his bets...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

atta boy kono....GOOD boy....sit, SIT!

Now wait your turn!

5 ( +5 / -0 )

It's often said that to become a PM, one needs proven working records both at cabinet (ministerial position) and top LDP executive position. Kono is relatively inexperienced in the latter though having already assumed major ministerial posts (FM, Defense, etc.). If he is assigned any LDP leadership post this time, he would be a hopeful successor to Suga.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Aly RustomToday  08:58 am JST

Trump encourages supporters to try to vote twice"

At least people can vote. Did you actually cast a vote for Suga? Did you?

Individual votes mean nothing as long as we have the Electoral College system. It deviates away from Individual Votes just as much as Japan's party picking method.

Kono will eventually become PM, just not yet. But with his education and background he is a very valuable member to any Japanese administration.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

But with his education and background he is a very valuable member to any Japanese administration.

i would beg to differ

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

OK, I like his mask fashion, but maybe that's all.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Although I strongly disagree with most of Abe's policies (and his Nippon-kai handlers), on positive aspect of his long tenure was that it appeared to the world, at least on the surface that Japan had an actual leader in charge. Now I fear we're back to another period of prime minister 'musical chairs' like from 2006 to 2013 when we had a different prime minister annually for an entire cycle of G7 meetings (and photo shoots). It was terribly embarrassing.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Kono was an adamant advocate of anti-nuclear power plants until Abe picked him to serve as his foreign minister. He then deleted all his anti-nuke articles from his blog to please Abe. Like a chameleon, Kono changes his color to adapt to a new environment. He does everything he does to achieve his goal of becoming PM,

2 ( +2 / -0 )

But kono does have an energetic spirit.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Kono I support you, but you don't stand a chance.

Even though he is a very capable man if you follow his career so far.

All the interactions I've seen between him and foreign leaders have been positive.

He speaks very well English which matters in today's world. Abe gave a speech in front of the U.S. Senate once, and it wasn't in Japanese I can tell you that.

He wants better relations with S. Korea, but also understands that it's a two way relationship and SKorea has to follow through with it's promises and aggrements signed.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Individual votes mean nothing as long as we have the Electoral College system.

No individual votes still account for something even with the electoral college. I'm with you 100% that it should be abolished, but to say that votes mean nothing because it exists is extreme and incorrect.

It deviates away from Individual Votes just as much as Japan's party picking method.

Yes it deviates away from individual votes but not just as much as Japan's where individual voting is non existent.

I agree that things like the EC, GM, and Money in Politics makes for a very flawed system. But to compare it with Japan's is just going too far.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

But with his education and background he is a very valuable member to any Japanese administration.

i would beg to differ

I'll second Cricky's opinion. Although I'll agree with OA that given the PATHETIC crop of politicians in the LDP Kono is a lesser of many evils. However, I'll take the opposition any day over ANYONE, even Kono, in the LDP.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

CrickyToday  12:16 pm JST

But with his education and background he is a very valuable member to any Japanese administration.

i would beg to differ

"He attended Hanamizu Elementary School, Keio Middle School, and then Keio High School. In 1981, he entered Keiō University to study economics. In 1982, he went to the United States, where he attended the Suffield Academy and Georgetown University, and studied comparative politics. In 1983, he worked for Senator Alan Cranston in his campaign for the Democratic Party presidential nomination. He also worked for Congressman Richard Shelby of Alabama for two years.He also spent time at the Warsaw School of Economics, Poland, during which he spent a night in prison after visiting the home of Solidarity leader, Lech Wałęsa. Kōno graduated from Georgetown University in 1985 with a Bachelor of Science in Foreign Service.

Kōno was first elected to the House of Representatives of Japan as a Liberal Democratic member in the October 1996 general election, at age 33. He has since been re-elected six times, in 2000, 2003, 2005, 2009, 2012 and 2014. Kōno has been a member of five standing committees of the House of Representatives: Economy; Environment; Health, Labour, & Welfare; Trade & Industry; and Finance. In addition, he has been a member of two special committees: Consumer Affairs, and Children & Youth Affairs."

OK, your turn. Why would you beg to differ?

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Yep, I know of many idiots who went to the right schools. You earn respect its not given because you went to a school that because of its elite status fails no one. Still beg to differ. And 100 sit ups a day, really got to be kidding. But I did up vote you on another thread. It's not personal.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

@cricky

I was hoping you had some insight that I'd find educating. Guess not. Thanks anyway.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Attending meetings does not a leader make. Nice response though, very insitful.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

And his attendance resulted in? Child poverty? Labour laws that are ignored. An economy in a spiral. Wait a minute so every committee he has a hand in has negative results for the population. Thank you for making that so clear. He really should not go near any meeting much better for us.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

@cricky

lol.... Sure dude. ok.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

He does everything he does to achieve his goal of becoming PM,

+1, no backbone whatsoever, a bit like a bluebottle - no backbone, stings randomly.

He was demoted from Foreign Minister (a post as good as PM, ie PM whilst overseas), because he didn't know his country's own direction, and his stint as Defense Minister (a lowly portfolio with little chance of interactions with constituents) is equally disastrous, one debacle after another, seemingly created chaos out of nothing just to get attention.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites