Photo shows people at the Manzanar internment camp site in California in 1943. Photo: Ansel Adams photo courtesy of the Library of Congress/Kyodo
politics

Biden vows 'never again' in marking 80 years since Japanese Americans' internment

128 Comments

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© KYODO

©2022 GPlusMedia Inc.

128 Comments

Comments have been disabled You can no longer respond to this thread.

The reason we have a things like a Bill or Rights or a Charter of Rights is so that the majority can never take away the rights of a minority.

In the fog of war, perhaps a majority of Americans were scared of people of Japanese decent. They probably didn't want to sit next to them in a restaurant or allow them to have certain jobs.

However, even if 95% don't like the 5%, it doesn't matter. The 5% still have rights.

Even single person has the same rights, regardless of race, skin color, vaccination, ethnicity or religion.

25 ( +37 / -12 )

Bronco- very well stated! Erosion becomes an avalanche.

13 ( +21 / -8 )

Another sad chapter in a nation’s history, always with promises of ‘never again’.

19 ( +23 / -4 )

Biden was sworn in to office last year at a time when hate crimes against Asian Americans were on the rise

I wonder who commits these hate crimes.

8 ( +23 / -15 )

It will happen again. It always happens again. It's nearly impossible to enforce your rights when a genuine emergency hits and the masses lose their collective minds. The best you can hope for is an apology and some compensation after the fact. Chinese-Americans will be rounded up when WW3 starts, if only for their own safety.

13 ( +21 / -8 )

If Biden is serious about ending racism against Asians, why did he end the DOJ's lawsuit against Ivy League schools who discriminate against Asians?

Actions speak louder than words.

12 ( +23 / -11 )

My takeaway is that Ansel Adams sure knew how to take a quality photograph.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

Unhappy days, the doj has nothing to do with these cases

-7 ( +4 / -11 )

Biden is right on this and even a few of his policies.

It is good to have a President who is trying to move the country forward and engage with the world. America isn't perfect. Far from it, but we don't sweep difficult stuff out of history (cough) ... much anymore. It is nice to have govt leaders that don't make up huge, crazy, lies too.

The ugly truth is out there. There is a long list of all the things that America did wrong. Hopefully, the govt and future leaders will learn from those mistakes for the sake of the entire world. I'm still shocked at some of the things that happened in America prior to the last 30 yrs. There are still terrible things happening in the US https://www.cbsnews.com/news/curtis-flowers-in-the-dark-60-minutes-2021-01-03/

-3 ( +12 / -15 )

I wonder who commits these hate crimes.

never ever let your guard down around these people, wherever you are in the globe.

2 ( +10 / -8 )

Forced internment is 99% never going to happen again in the US for a couple of reasons.

1st - The external political policies of the US has changed. At the time of WW2, the US was disengaged with global politics and soft power.

2nd- the internal makeup and presentation of the American people has diversified since WW2. Too many different people are presented in everyday situations to create a blanket fear of any one group in major economic areas. The American Olympic team would look mighty different if this were to happen.

3rd- too much push back and too many records. People would be affected today have Facebook, Twitter, TickTok, VK, JT and countless other sites to contact. The US government would have to suppress all of that information and then hope countries like Russia or China don’t or can’t respond or use a modern day interment as propaganda.

Sorry 99.9% impossible to happen again.

-4 ( +8 / -12 )

Isn’t this guy threatening China? Never again?

-17 ( +10 / -27 )

"as long as they are not hurting someone else".

So at the moment, the unvaccinated have a particular social obligation.

Little bit of a stretch don’t you think? So the threat of espionage doesn’t warrant the imprisonment of others but if they don’t take take a vaccine then they should? Wow…

2 ( +11 / -9 )

Here is a history lesson every American should know. In WW II, a battalion was cut off by the Germans. Two units of the same division attempted to rescue them and failed. The Americans, brought in the 100th battalion of the 442nd Regimental Combat team. They succeeded. After the battle, this battalion (over 400 men to start) was down to 75 non-casualties. This battalion was a National Guard outfit from Hawaii and was comprised by Japanese-Americans. When Hawaii applied for statehood, their application was spearheaded by a southern state which was instrumental in their gaining admission. The state was Texas. The lost battalion was part of the 36th Division which was a Texas National Guard outfit.

23 ( +27 / -4 )

There is a long list of all the things that America did wrong.

I agree, and have been able to learn, on my own about many on that list. But did so mostly after leaving K-12.

Not surprising that one group, made up mainly of people from the US's majority ethnicity do not want younger generations to be taught about what members of that majority ethnic group did to those not from their ethnic group, and in some cases continue to do, While at the same time trying to cover up ugly things previous generations did. (for an example, look at how the Alamo has been turned into a myth when in reality it was an attempt to continue slavery in Texas).

With regard to being able to find out what a country's governments and people have done historically and are doing today, the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and several western European nations have frequently opened books to allow the public to learn about mistakes made and atrocities committed. Unlike some other nations.

-9 ( +7 / -16 )

As a child growing up on the US west coast I knew lived near, went to school with and played on sports teams with several ethnic-Japanese kids families whose parents had been thrown into concentration camps and had their property taken from them, including farm lands later sold by someone from the ethnic majority who made huge amounts of money by stealing the family lands and businesses.

13 ( +18 / -5 )

Just more meaningless words ….

-9 ( +11 / -20 )

Even single person has the same rights, regardless of race, skin color, vaccination, ethnicity or religion.

Really clever. Do you really believe that public health measures are similar to racial segregation, or are you just giving us a morning troll?

0 ( +10 / -10 )

When 9/11 happened, i heard alot of xenophobic hate talk about committing these offenses against Muslim Americans as well as Americans of Arabic and Indian ethnicity. People around here were like chickens with their heads off, the hatred was stifling, smothering and sickening. Then the 20-year Afghan War began and the stupid wasteful Iraq War started in 2003. Both those wars were broadcast 24/7 just like Desert Storm, as sick gladiatorial entertainment for the immature armchair warrior public.

Fast forward to 2014 when the beast ISIS rose out of the ashes of Iraq, ISIS was committing genocide against every religion they could, even true Muslims. Then the Trump dictatorship just simply used ISIS as an excuse to not allow any refugees from that region to flee to the US. Then Trumpster lied about Hispanics 'invading' the US, calling it a 'war' and he kidnapped thousands of migrant and US citizen children of Spanish descent and stuck them in filthy overcrowded concentration camps like the fascist that he is. Only thing is, there never was a war as he claimed there was.

Abuses are abuses, no matter who it is aimed at or what the excuse is or whether there's a war or not. Xenophobia is inexcusable and indefensible. And that applies to now. Yes, the CoVid manifested itself in Wuhan, China but that's no excuse to pick on Chinese-Americans or for that matter anyone of Oriental/East Asian descent. We must never commit these acts of hate like that again.

NEVER AGAIN!!!!!

6 ( +15 / -9 )

 'Nidoto Nai Yoni,'

Yeah, easy to say Japanese words which come cheap when you are talking about events that happened 80 long years ago in the past when Japanese-Americans were stripped of their rights, abducted into camps and their property and businesses plundered, but Biden needs to learn how to apologize in Pashto, Dari and Arabic among others and act in the present to close down Kamp Gitmo, the blood-spattered stain on America's credibility and reputation as a champion of democracy. And as an after-thought, in a gesture of goodwill and by way of an apology for over 120 years of American exploitation and atrocious mistreatment and abuse, return the land of Guantanamo to its rightful owners, the Cuban people.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

It will happen again. It always happens again.

They always find an excuse, accusing one group of being a danger to the rest, which Biden tried to do just last year.

-1 ( +11 / -12 )

I met George Takei at a Trekkie convention in 1992.

He broke the mold about Oriental/East Asian actors in American cinema, he would not take any role that portrayed his race in a stereotypical or buffoonish light. None of that.

Later, after coming out publically he became a gay icon as well.

He talks frequently about his experiences during this internment period. He is a proud Japanese-American and as a child he was detained with his family under that bullcrap hatred policy during WW2. He also spoke out explicitly (from experience) against the idea of doing the same against Muslim Americans, Arab Americans and other ethnicities during the 00's 'War on Terror'.

He has a lot of say and much that we can learn from this guy and his 80+ years of life.

19 ( +23 / -4 )

We must never commit these acts of hate like that again. 

NEVER AGAIN!!!!! 

Yes, sadly, but man has a short memory span, it will happen again in one form or another because we are humans and territorial by nature and somewhere down the line, it will happen again because man cannot see past its safe zone especially when economic times or times of war escalate, we are fallible creatures.

7 ( +13 / -6 )

Never again? As long as people can still justify lighting nukes over civilian cities it can happen again.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

I dislike this because it feeds the narrative of Japanese as victims.

If the welfare of Japanese was of paramount importance, perhaps their government should not have initiated a war against America and her allies?

-25 ( +6 / -31 )

Racism will never end. Live with it !

-13 ( +5 / -18 )

Even single person has the same rights, regardless of race, skin color, vaccination, ethnicity or religion.

Being aware and admitting there is discrimination is the important first step next it working towards eliminating racism with laws and penalties that are seriously enforced. Unfortunately discrimination will never end as those unaffected by it don't know how it feels to be discriminated and don't think it is discriminination. Landlords continue to refuse tenants not based on their financial standing but based on their nationality, unfortunately since there is no awareness nobody see it as discrimination.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

I wish i could believe that the USA would "never" do something like that again.

In a country that boasts of being a world leader and freedom for all .

A country filled with international immigrants , multiple ethnicities , religious extremists , and prejudice groups.

If this young country the UNITED STATES can achieve such lofty ideas as freedom and equal rights whilst stopping prejudice , that would be amazing !

But until that actually happens it's not believable .

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Well said, sir. Nothing to argue with @bass4funk on this:

@bass4funk 9:32am: “Never Again!” - “Yes, sadly, but man has a short memory span, it will happen again in one form or another because we are humans and territorial by nature and somewhere down the line, it will happen again because man cannot see past its safe zone especially when economic times or times of war escalate, we are fallible creatures

(Unless, of course, there are some justly looking to argue.)

0 ( +3 / -3 )

But lets all ignore the historical fact that at least one Japanese resident of Hawaii and Singapore were known to have been passing valuable information to the Japanese military. Many UK residents of German and Austrian origin were arrested in 1939. It was war time.

-14 ( +11 / -25 )

There is so much fawning of America in Japan that it is clear this has all been forgiven and forgotten so best not to bring it up and re-write the script. But I am sure history will repeat itself as always.

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

Think the topic and point of the above story is Biden’s vow, moving forward, “Never Again”.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Good to know that,

But I should also state this China, Myanmar, Israel, Sudan and many other NON Democratic

nations have open air prisons were they hold thousands of people in small areas not allowed to leave or go beyond the camps borders.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Biden is a politician, and a puppet one, at that-

His actions and language are bargaining chips.

He has never, at anytime, been anything more.

Place weight/import accordingly.

-9 ( +6 / -15 )

BungleToday  09:45 am JST

I dislike this because it feeds the narrative of Japanese as victims.

They were AMERICANS of Japanese descent. And yes they were victims.

18 ( +27 / -9 )

Hey Joe, say never again with the lies, interventionism, regular bombings, napalm, nukes, and invading countries..

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

In never never land where nothing never happens.

The great Biden has spoken !

Vows and rules and regulations , laws in the USA are never broken ???

It appears that a large majority of USA citizens feel the need to carry a firearm to be able to feel safe.

To live in fear isn't freedom.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

But lets all ignore the historical fact that at least one Japanese resident of Hawaii and Singapore were known to have been passing valuable information to the Japanese military. Many UK residents of German and Austrian origin were arrested in 1939. It was war time.

Exactly. But you can't argue with these people above; they know nothing about the reality of the Japanese at war.

-16 ( +4 / -20 )

The unjustifiable interment & unlawful imprisonment of a country’s citizens is abominable. - Any comparison of a country’s duly-elected leaders exercising said country’s sovereign right to selectively bar residents of other countries from entry are just inflammatory attempts to turn this memorial event into a debate on partisan politics. Shameful and embarrassing.

Time to reflect on the victims, not self-interest.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

They were AMERICANS of Japanese descent. And yes they were victims.

And what of Japan’s Imperial subjects in East Asia? What mercy were they shown? NONE!

Enough of the special pleading.

-4 ( +11 / -15 )

David BrentToday  10:46 am JST

But lets all ignore the historical fact that at least one Japanese resident of Hawaii and Singapore were known to have been passing valuable information to the Japanese military. Many UK residents of German and Austrian origin were arrested in 1939. It was war time.

Exactly. But you can't argue with these people above; they know nothing about the reality of the Japanese at war.

You know nothing about Japanese Americans in WWII. In fact you can't even differentiate between "the Japanese" and "Americans of Japanese ancestry".

"Nearly 120,000 men, women, and children were forced from their homes and confined in camps for years, without benefit of trial. Despite this treatment, 33,000 Japanese Americans served their country in Europe and the Pacific, earning numerous honors. Roughly 6,000 Japanese Americans served as translators and interpreters with the Military Intelligence Service (MIS) in the Pacific. The contributions of Nisei (second-generation Japanese Americans) in the realm of intelligence and communications were vital to victory in the Pacific."

https://www.nationalww2museum.org/war/articles/military-intelligence-service-translators-interpreters

14 ( +17 / -3 )

Again we see the hypocrisy of the history of Internment during World War II. While the incarceration of Japanese-Americans from California, Oregon and Washington is acknowledged and belatedly compensated, the analogous history of the incarceration of German immigrants and German-Americans and Italian Immigrants and Italian Americans is shoved down the Orwellian memory hole. Go to Crystal City's internment camp. It housed German-Americans and Japanese-Americans. There is a plaque there for the Japanese-Americans but for the German-Americans.

There was an attempt by several Senators to fall a bill to compensate German and Italian Americans but did not go through.

Note: Japanese Americans in Hawaii were NOT sent into prison camps. If they were, the famed 100th battalion of the 442nd Regimental Combat team would not have existed.

-11 ( +2 / -13 )

"zichiToday  10:47 am JST

If Trump were to win in 2024 there will be another "again".

Isn't it a bit early to start the election campaign?

Especially one that based on hate,,,

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Now Wikipedia has articles on the incarceration of German and Italian Americans. The move to compensate German and Italians Americans happened in 2001. The bill did not go through.

Another note on this sordid business. Japanese and German residents were rounded up and sent to American concentration camps. GermanJews were among victims.

On February 3, 2003 Rep. Mike Honda (D-CA) introduced H. Res. 56 calling for an National Day of Remembrance for the Japanese, German and Italian Americans whose civil liberties were grossly violated.

-9 ( +3 / -12 )

Regardless of your political persuasion, if deem necessary, incrassation without trail will continue.

The UK Government unleased Operation Demetrius in Northern Ireland August 1971 mass arrests and internment of those suspected of creating trouble could be held without trial, the policy continued until 1975.

With the benefit of hindsight decades later politician will reflect, 'Let It Not Happen Again' weasel words

Oh yes It will.

Circumstances will arise from radicalisation; you seriously don’t believe that Guantanamo Bay was a holiday destination for radical Islamic fundamentalists?

There is 20th/21st century hybrid version of internment, rendition.

The practice of detaining a suspected terrorist operative in a foreign country and transferring him or her to the United States or to another foreign country. It has proved to be an effective way to take terrorists off the street and collect extract, under duress, on occasion, some valuable information.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Trump banned Muslims from entering America.

Certain Muslims that had a lengthy recorded history with terrorism. At the same time the largest Muslim nation (Indonesia) wasn’t on that list. So to insinuate it was an all out war on the faith is just ludicrous.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

Palestine. Gaza Strip. Guantánamo. Julian Assuage.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Could we have that @11:26am reposted with use of the site’s convenient interface features as it’s ‘difficult to distinguish’ between what may be commentary & opinion and what may be official site policy.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

As Zichi commented - many were sent to Australia.

Australia had it's own internment camp system filled predominantly with those of Italian, German & Japanese heritage.

And the terrible story - now quite well known - of the Dunera Boys (came on the ship Dunera). They were Jewish refugees from Germany who escaped to England only to be transported to Australia with German/Italian POWs. Why? Because they were German nationals. And they were interned as possible spies.

Also interned were people of "Leftish" backgrounds seen as sympathizers with Russia - who was supposedly on the "good side".

Crazy times.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

Correction: At Crystal city, "There is a plaque there for the Japanese-Americans but NOT for the German-Americans.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Which Muslims who had a long recorded history with terrorism.

I could go all day and tell you and I’m not on this particular thread, but I will say this, 7 banned Muslim nations doesn’t equate to the entire Muslim culture, don’t even start that. Those 7 countries were banned for a reason.

I didn't insinuate but Trump banned Muslims from selective countries but not from Saudi Arabia where the 9/11 terrorists came from?

We also went over that one in great length as to why that is.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

Isn’t this guy threatening China? Never again?

remind me again who started that failed trade war with the Chinese.

2020 over $360 billion in Chinese goods bought by Americans

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Is it not always the case when diplomacy, basic common sense break down, the bloodshed in conflicts, extreme decisions are enacted justified for the common good, national security.

Only for the next generations to have to realize the consequences.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

  Which Muslims who had a long recorded history with terrorism.

We covered that.

I didn't insinuate but Trump banned Muslims from selective countries but not from Saudi Arabia where the 9/11 terrorists came from?

We covered that as well.

Because Saudi spends billions of dollars on American weapons. Rich countries get a Trump pass even if the worse terrorists come from there.

Yup, sad and revolting as it is.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

Do you think the Japanese WOULND'T do the SAME if WE were in Japan, and THEY were in North America?

It's about an ENEMY, it's NOT about "Race".

-5 ( +6 / -11 )

Why not just provide the link or links with comments from the start to maintain credibility? - Claiming a post includes official wording without using “quotes” could mean portions were transposed to support just one viewpoint and therefore, might be a misrepresentation. The takeaway is: it’s perhaps just more ‘deflection’, but mostly, disingenuous.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

WA4TKGToday  12:00 pm JST

Do you think the Japanese WOULND'T do the SAME if WE were in Japan, and THEY were in North America?

It's about an ENEMY, it's NOT about "Race".

Isn't it about American citizen with Japanese descent? or did they carry dual passports then like most of you often claim for?

5 ( +10 / -5 )

The sale of American weapons to kill millions more is more important than the loss of American lives in 9/11?

Never again it should have been

Well, that’s not how it works so….

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

M3M3M3:

Chinese-Americans will be rounded up when WW3 starts, if only for their own safety.

Even in Australia this round-up of Japanese-Aussies happened. See especially 34:30-35:40:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kA2KaEKs1LA

And what's more concerning is what may happen if US and Australia do what they're itching to do which is to start a war with China:

35:30 One Chinese-Australian to the other: John, I'll see you there.

And then John, the fearmongering, warmongering, anti-China Chinese-Australian (who actually works in ASPI although the program omits that huge tiny fact) has a lump in his throat and a look of awkwardness. Classic!

-10 ( +2 / -12 )

Sure, they were Americans...but I STILL Pose the question, had things been REVERSED.

-9 ( +5 / -14 )

Admitting to one’s mistakes and showing reflection and regret. Shows integrity and maturity. Wish others would follow, cough cough.

Also I’m not American but how can anyone down vote Bronco’s post…..

0 ( +7 / -7 )

"Americans of Japanese decent" But how would Japan regard them? Even today, Brazilians and Peruvians of Japanese decent are regarded as being Japanese enough to get special treatment to enter Japan.

Locking up a few potential 5th columnists is pretty small fry compared to other actions during the war.

-9 ( +4 / -13 )

Regardless of what Biden said, this could still happen again, because it is not illegal.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Depending on what happens in the Ukraine over the next few months it might be Russian Americans getting locked up.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

My father and my relatives were forced to go “Camp.” He/They just took it on the cheek and endured.

After being released from the “Camp,” they had to endure the public’s hate with Asians.

In 1980, my Japanese American friends and I entered a Denny’s. A few of the patrons shouted out to us “Remember Pearl Harbor!"

Things have not changed...

10 ( +12 / -2 )

What's going on in Canada now?? Getting close??

0 ( +2 / -2 )

In 1980, my Japanese American friends and I entered a Denny’s. A few of the patrons shouted out to us “Remember Pearl Harbor!"

Things have not changed...

Wow! Sorry to hear that, being from Southern California and growing up around Asians, I never seen nor witnessed hatred towards any of my Asian friends, doesn't mean it wasn't there but thank God I never witnessed it, but I have seen it towards other races every blue moon and it's sick to watch and hear people in this generation can still hold racist feelings. WE have a very long way to go, but for the most part, things have indeed changed quite a lot, not perfectly, but quite a progress.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Another "beat the clock" blooper. The U.S. rounded up Germans (including Jews) in South America and put them on filthy ships and then sent them to U.S. relocation centers in the U.S.

-12 ( +2 / -14 )

80 years to late?

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

One wonders when J-govt will own up to the wrongs Japan did in WW2? Ever?

-6 ( +9 / -15 )

Americans of Japanese decent" But how would Japan regard them? Even today, Brazilians and Peruvians of Japanese decent are regarded as being Japanese enough to get special treatment to enter Japan.

Funny they get put out to scrap as soon as the economy takes a downturn.

-10 ( +4 / -14 )

zichiToday  02:28 pm JST

> How many troops died in Japanese POW camps?

Many thousands.

I knew people from our community who were tortured but survived but never fully recovered.

And 575,000 Japanese detained in Siberia Slave Camp even after the war ended, and more than 55,000 died there.

10 ( +13 / -3 )

Sad, but it could've been worse - they could've been in Japanese camps and used as slaves to build railways or go down mines.

-7 ( +6 / -13 )

How ironic. It was a democrat that interned the Japanese Americans and a republican that apologized and compensated them for it. Considering how group oriented democrats are, you'd think Biden would apologize on behalf of his party and recognize the whole ordeal for what it was. A lesson in the dangers of centralization of power. But that wouldn't be very democrat of him.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

A nice sentiment from the current President, however he can only speak for "during his leadership" as each president that comes after can and would do the same again, IF they believed it was necessary.

Presidents can cancel agreements made by previous administrations and can pull out of treaties as shown by the last occupant in the White House.

Not something that is limited to the US, every nation is in the same boat, when leaders change so can policy and direction as well as promises.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Even single person has the same rights, regardless of race, skin color, vaccination ethnicity or religion.

Bronco forgot sexual minorities. He is a little behind the times.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

OssanAmerica...

You know nothing about Japanese Americans in WWII. In fact you can't even differentiate between "the Japanese" and "Americans of Japanese ancestry".

"Nearly 120,000 men, women, and children were forced from their homes and confined in camps for years, without benefit of trial. Despite this treatment, 33,000 Japanese Americans served their country in Europe and the Pacific, earning numerous honors. Roughly 6,000 Japanese Americans served as translators and interpreters with the Military Intelligence Service (MIS) in the Pacific. The contributions of Nisei (second-generation Japanese Americans) in the realm of intelligence and communications were vital to victory in the Pacific."

Thanks, I know very well about all that. But doesn't make any difference that the US wasn't going to risk any of them having the chance to aid the enemy. Was it wrong? Probably. With at least an element of racism? Definitely. It was war remember? Personal rights don't count for much. How long would it take to investigate the loyalty of all the Japanese Americans? Much easier just to round them all up and put them in camps. Yes, war sucks.

-7 ( +4 / -11 )

zichiToday  04:06 pm JST

kenny G

yes, but Imperialist Japan was the invader.

IJA never invaded Russian soil. Soviet was the invader ignoring not only non-aggression pact but also Potsdam declaration by detaining disarmed surrenders into slave labor camp for years after war ended.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

Biden must think he's immortal and will be the president until the end of time if "never again" was to happen.

Zero prejudice is an excellent idea to strive for but however the USA is finding that consistently impossible to achieve.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Mr KiplingToday  04:46 pm JST

By refusing to recognize that it was wrong you dishonor the uniforms and service that these brave men gave to their country while their families were wrongfully put behind barbed wire. What makes the United States great is that unlike dictatorships, we can face our mistakes and admit fault. Guess you missed the notice.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Just looking at some of the posters with negativity toward this shows that much more why it is necessary to remember these types of shameful history.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

I think the essence of this topic is racism and whatever J-Govt did or didn't to POWS in camps during WW2 should be moderated as off-topic. Almost every western powers including Russia, and even China did the wrongs, invading others in history. Which one of those countries had expressed clear apologies and owned up to atrocities so far?

Resetting your clock at WW2 would not justify your narratives.

3 ( +10 / -7 )

IJA never invaded Russian soil. Soviet was the invader ignoring not only non-aggression pact but also Potsdam declaration by detaining disarmed surrenders into slave labor camp for years after war ended.

gotta study history better, buddy

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

CognacToday  06:28 pm JST

IJA never invaded Russian soil. Soviet was the invader ignoring not only non-aggression pact but also Potsdam declaration by detaining disarmed surrenders into slave labor camp for years after war ended.

gotta study history better, buddy

gotta study to read primary source as your history seems to jammed with garbage.

Or what is incorrect in my post? BUDDY?

4 ( +8 / -4 )

I wonder if there's the same level of regret towards the actions of Japan during and before WW2 by the Japanese politicians and the public.

-8 ( +8 / -16 )

@Chinpo wo namero

As if Japan interned American-Japanese who fought against their home countries. This is very good article why multiple passports are questionable when human beings are this much stupid

4 ( +9 / -5 )

I am all for respect.

Remembrance and learning history is a nice thing. But you need open-mindedness and education.

Is that part of America at school and general celebration ? Not sure.

Also, periods of history are all with different rights, laws and cultural thinking.

For instance and to start with, in France we ever refer to a French person by its origin (never heard of Arabo/Afro/Hispano/Porto/Asian Frenchman or woman). It is irrelevant. But a national sport in the US.

And surely, there would have been spies in all those 120 000 interned Japanese American. No time to check when you are having thousands of soldiers dying against Japan. No US citizen demonstrated at that time so it was acceptable politically. That is History and we are supposed to learn from history.

Be weak and history will repeat. Europe is doing the same mistakes with Russia at the present time with Ukraine invasion (Crimea was easy, then...)

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

On topic: Great to hear Biden show the maturity to acknowledge one of USA's wrongdoings during WW2 instead of trying to whitewash, or ignore, or outright call it fake.

It is up to the mods to take out the trash.

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

@Zoroto

I wonder who commits these hate crimes.

Ms. Yam (Asian writer)

Anti-Asian hate crimes increased 339 percent nationwide last year, report says

https://news.yahoo.com/anti-asian-hate-crimes-increased-230233391.html

Ms. Yam also said:

The report also found that Black Americans remained the most targeted group across most cities. 

Then she reported:

“Especially during a time when groups are trying to divide and pit vulnerable communities against each other, we must remember that we are stronger together,” Yang said

The same group of people who committed most of racist acts in the US and around the globe.

If Ms. Yam is not talking about Asians, and she is not talking about Blacks.

Then every knows who she is talking about. The same people calling COVID-19, the "China virus!

1 ( +8 / -7 )

By refusing to recognize that it was wrong you dishonor the uniforms and service that these brave men gave to their country while their families were wrongfully put behind barbed wire. What makes the United States great is that unlike dictatorships, we can face our mistakes and admit fault. Guess you missed the notice.

Correct. I guess that Japan has dishonoured it's own SDF.

-9 ( +5 / -14 )

zichiToday  02:28 pm JST

how many Japanese died in American internment camps?

1,862 from all causes.

How many troops died in Japanese POW camps?

Many thousands.

Are you actually equating civilians-women and children taken from their homes and put into internment camps to POW soldiers captured in battle??

9 ( +14 / -5 )

The topic was about how a ethnic group, Americans, was treated during that WAR.

5 ( +10 / -5 )

Are you actually equating civilians-women and children taken from their homes and put into internment camps to POW soldiers captured in battle??

Many civilians in Japans occupied territories were taken from their homes and interned during WW2.

Some suffered brutal treatment.

-6 ( +8 / -14 )

Some people here don't see the irony of their endlessly crying about so-called off-topic posts.

Anyway, what the US government did to the Japanese Americans at the time was undeniably wrong and inexcusable. It should be remembered and lessons learned from that should lead to a future where this is "never again" repeated. And I can only hope that the other countries which are still in denial show the same remorse and commitment one day.

-1 ( +7 / -8 )

With great sadness, much of the possessions & mementos surviving Japanese-American families would love to recover, cherish or place in family-curated internee museums were lost. This happened through unreasonable, unwarranted and, in some instances, unlawful seizures & confiscations. Later, many items were abandoned during the hasty evacuations upon closures of the camps or just simply, just lost to time & the harsh elements surrounding the camps.

Last year, worlds news covered this very sad yet poignant legacy. There were unresolved issues on whether provenance could be established of who the actual original owners of these items & artifacts were before, during and after the war.

One Japanese-American internee, a Mr. Matsumura, was permitted to hike in the nearby mountains to draw and paint in the closing days of the war but may have succumbed to a sudden storm during his final outing. Search teams found his remains and interred them there amongst the rocks of the mountainside. In recent years, his remains were discovered by other hikers.

The surviving granddaughter of of Mr. Matsumura and others only sought to recover what they could of items they thought were from the camps, most recently those believed to be part of his portfolio from during in his internment.

Hopefully, whether they were acquired through purchases or given as gifts, the subsequent owners may come to some kind of accord with the surviving families.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

The down votes by the deniers does not alter the truth: German-Americans and residents and Italian Americans and residents were subject to the same conditions as Japanese-Americans and residents who (for the most part) lived in Washington, Oregon and California.

There are sorry histories behind all of this that can be found easily on the Internet. If you have courage to look and the honesty to accept historical truth you'll see that what have written here a very small part of a larger picture.

-10 ( +3 / -13 )

OssanAmerika:

By refusing to recognize that it was wrong you dishonor the uniforms and service that these brave men gave to their country while their families were wrongfully put behind barbed wire. What makes the United States great is that unlike dictatorships, we can face our mistakes and admit fault. Guess you missed the notice.

Get off your high horse. Your country has killed millions of innocent people all over the world.

-9 ( +3 / -12 )

Call me crazy, but I think imprisoning citizens because of their race or heritage is bad.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

Surviving people who were interned and descendants of internees who had passed on since WW2 were compensated in the early 1990's and an apology given. It's an old story.

-12 ( +1 / -13 )

Surviving people who were interned and descendants of internees who had passed on since WW2 were compensated in the early 1990's and an apology given. It's an old story.

Are you suggesting that because it's been dealt with, we should forget history and try to ensure this one is not dredged up again? That's what your statement would seem to suggest.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Are you suggesting that because it's been dealt with, we should forget history and try to ensure this one is not dredged up again? That's what your statement would seem to suggest.

The headline of this article should answer your question.

-8 ( +1 / -9 )

German-Americans and residents and Italian Americans and residents were subject to the same conditions as Japanese-Americans and residents 

Yes, true.

However, 100,000 more Japanese-Americans and descendants were interned than all of the combined European-Americans interned.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Elvis is hereFeb. 20  09:48 am JST

So the threat of espionage doesn’t warrant the imprisonment of others but if they don’t take take a vaccine then they should? 

I've read that comment a number of times and don't really understand what it means.

But, to clarify, IMO the threat of espionage could warrant imprisonment as espionage could threaten the safety of others. A logical cause and effect relationship applies.

During WW2 there were Americans spying for Nazi Germany but none for fascist Japan. And even if there were, this interment is inexcusable.

bass4funkFeb. 20  11:35 am JST

Trump banned Muslims from entering America.

Certain Muslims that had a lengthy recorded history with terrorism. At the same time the largest Muslim nation (Indonesia) wasn’t on that list. So to insinuate it was an all out war on the faith is just ludicrous.

TreasonTrump didn't enact a 'Muslim ban'. He banned Muslims, Christians, Jews, Sikhs, Zoroastrians, Druze, everybody from the Middle East and Somalia but not Saudi Arabia. It had nothing to do with religion at all, he has no business interests in those nations listed and he's a pouting RACIST. As for Saudi Arabia, he has business ties there and he kissed the King's keister. No, terrorism, extremism, ISIS had nothing to do with that and neither did Islam, really. It was ethnic bigotry and nothing else.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Amazing how a few ignorant balloons are slandering a group of wrongfully incarcerated American citizens because they apparently can’t tell the difference between ethnic American minorities and the Japanese Imperial Army. Imagine how dumb you have to be believe that a bunch of laborers locked up in California internment camps were also somehow committing war atrocities thousands of miles away in Asia. Keep up the good work.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

The 442nd is one of the great stories in American history. Japanese Americans were able to overcome grave injustices to become heroes and major contributors to America.

This would seem to make for a great Hollywood movie. But Hollywood doesn't seem to be interested in the success of those that work hard and don't wear the victim label.

9 ( +11 / -2 )

Of course, apology is better than nothing.

Here in Okinawa, the U.S. never admits, let alone apologizes for, the fact that the land on which most U.S. bases in Okinawa, as represented by USMC Air Station Futenma, sit, are illegally confiscated private land which the U.S. occupation forces encroached upon with impunity while they kept area residents herded in camps. Isn't this truly subject to apology?

But the U.S. government is not only not apologizing for it but instead demanding Futenma‘s replacement be built at another site in return for its return.

No big deal here?

-8 ( +1 / -9 )

Probably, the Biden administration is trying to teach the world community, especially China with the Uighur problem, how sincere the U.S. is toward its own citizens. But will Biden's "good will" touch the heartstrings of the world community?

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

WASHINGTON

U.S. President Joe Biden has pledged to tackle racism as the nation marks 80 years since the signing of a presidential order that led to the incarceration of some 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II.

This 1st line of the article clarifies what this article is about. US presidents have been apologizing 80 years for what they have done to their fellow American citizen, however ,some people here cannot stop crying about whatever Japan did this and that on the battlefields regardless of disputed subjects in usual moronic manner.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites