politics

Gov't to remove contentious part in labor reform draft bill: Abe

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Numerous errors in a labor ministry survey that was initially designed to be used to promote the new discretionary labor system sparked criticism from opposition parties that say the government is trying to use the flawed data in favor of its proposal.

What else is new? There are far too many instances where "flawed" data is used and accepted here.

It is nice to see that Abe FINALLY got called out on the carpet and was forced to withdraw something because of it!

7 ( +8 / -1 )

A descrace that a government department who are paid by tax payers are unable to present actual facts. Rather the "facts" the regime want. This labour reform bill is 50 years out of date and bears no relevance to what is happening in 2018.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

"The government will not be able to move forward on the bill unless we accurately assess the current (work) conditions" 

Current work conditions? Do they mean they don’t know? Wages are down and taxes are up. People are doing excessive amounts overtime in order to keep their jobs on yearly reviewed contracts. They have no job security and, as a result, take no pride in their work forcing down quality of products and efficiency in the workplace. The government keeps spouting how the want women back in the workforce, but have done nothing about equality in the workplace or addressed the child care crisis.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Agree with the above 3 commentators. Pretty much summed it up. Nothing else to say except that the picture gave me morning sickness.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

"It will take a certain period of time."

Elected in 2012, promising bold structural reforms, six years later the administration he leads has failed to even tinker around the edges of labour market regulations.

You have to be bold! This is not bold!

3 ( +5 / -2 )

approved a record 97.71 trillion yen ($911 billion) budget

I don’t think you can call it a “budget”, you may call it record spending though. 35 trillion or so if that is to be deficit financed by the central bank “printing presses”.

Not a budget, just spending.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

They have no job security and, as a result, take no pride in their work

Agree with your comment Crikey but have some issues with just this part.

Your comment applies specifically to the class of contract workers.

But it is not true of the class of full time permanent workers.

I strongly believe that Japan’s most serious labour market issue is the existence of these two classes of worker.

There was a study that showed a whopping 40% of permanent workers suffering from low motivation - that is secure, permanent workers.

Their lack of motivation more likely stems from their boring work place, not being able to fully use their skills and abilities etc

Bold reforms would (1) level the playing field for all workers, removing the two classes of worker, and (2) encourage labour mobility so that people can use their skills to the best degree in a work place where those skills are in demand by a successful employer.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

“ a labor ministry survey that was initially designed to be used to promote the new discretionary labor system “

Is this a poor translation? Was the survey actually designed to have a predetermined outcome? Anyway, whether it was an improper endeavor from the start or just incredibly incompetent, I’m glad they’ve been called out on it and Abs’s been forced to backtrack. How they even thought they could sneak through such a laughably bad bunch of data is a mystery. Did they really think the opposition wouldn’t spot the hundreds of odd bits such as people supposedy having worked 45 hours in one day?

2 ( +3 / -1 )

That quote was disillusioned not mine, credit where credit due. And I agree the current system is unsustainable, And the governments response unfathnoble.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Yeah, the government needs to fix the flawed data issue ASAP. Using inaccurate data severely undermines confidence in the accuracy of government statistics and using flawed data deliberately is unacceptable

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Apologies Cricky and Disillusioned for mixing you both up. So easy to confuse one legend with another.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

And it was the opposition forces who discovered the flaw.

The public should openly thank the opposition from preventing the goverment of exploiting the country’s workers!

It wasn’t LDP who voluntarily decided to scrap the bill, the opposition rightfully pressed them to do it. The opposition should be applauded for their continous effort to protect the people of Japan.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

And it was the opposition forces who discovered the flaw.

Not quite, it was the opposition that brought it out in the open.

Which is a bigger problem, as much goes past without being called out by anyone, and people take the government reported "facts" as being accurate.

There are many statistical based reports published by the government on a regular basis that can leave people scratching their heads wondering , however the Japanese people in general are not critical of the government, nor reported statistics, and accept that if they are published they "must" be accurate and true.

Shouldn't matter who discovers or outs the flaws, but here it matters big time.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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