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Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida, front center, poses with Kim Yoon, front left, chairman of the Korea-Japan Economic Association and his Japanese counterpart Mikio Sasaki, front right, and members of a South Korean business group at the prime minister's office in Tokyo, on Monday. Image: Franck Robichon/Pool via AP
politics

Kishida's cabinet support rate edges up to 24.2%: poll

21 Comments

The approval rating for Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida's cabinet has edged up by 0.4 percentage point to 24.2 percent, a Kyodo News survey showed Monday, with a political funds scandal still shaking his Liberal Democratic Party.

The telephone poll conducted for three days from Saturday also showed 79.7 percent of respondents disapprove of the ruling bloc's proposals to amend the political funds control law, which the LDP and its junior coalition partner, Komeito party, agreed on last week.

After the political funds scandal was revealed late last year, the support rate for Kishida's cabinet, launched in October 2021, dropped below what is widely recognized as the "danger level" of 30 percent and hit an all-time low in March at 20.1 percent.

Kishida's LDP has come under scrutiny after some of its factions, such as the largest one formerly led by the late Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, neglected to report portions of their incomes from fundraising parties and maintained slush funds for years.

As Kishida has pledged to revise the political funds control law by the end of the ongoing parliamentary session through June, the LDP and Komeito agreed Thursday to their proposals aimed at enhancing transparency in the usage of money available to lawmakers.

The ruling camp decided to lower the threshold for disclosing the names of party ticket buyers from the current 200,000 yen but has yet to determine the extent of the reduction, triggering a backlash from opposition lawmakers.

In the latest survey, 42.7 percent of respondents called for tougher penalties for failing to properly report revenue from political fundraising parties, and 24.7 percent advocated for the prohibition of such events.

The LDP and Komeito also affirmed that senior lawmakers should disclose how they utilize the so-called policy activity funds provided by their parties. Despite reaching expenditures of hundreds of millions of yen, these funds have not been subject to disclosure until now.

As for how issues related to policy activity funds should be resolved, the survey showed that 52.0 percent said their usage should be disclosed in detail, while 26.8 percent sought their abolishment, and 3.0 percent answered that tighter regulation is unnecessary.

Legal experts have criticized the political funds control law for loopholes enabling politicians to create slush funds.

On the economic front, Kishida's leadership has been called into question as his government has failed to implement effective measures to curb the yen's rapid decline to 34-year lows against the U.S. dollar, which has driven up import costs and hiked consumer prices at home.

The survey showed 90.5 percent believe wage growth surpassing inflation will not be realized by the end of this year. Japan's real wages, adjusted for inflation, slid for the 24th consecutive month in March as salary gains continued to fall short of sharp price rises.

As domestic demand has shown few signs of a drastic recovery, the support rate for the LDP stood at 24.7 percent in May, around its lowest level since December 2012 when the party scored a landslide victory in the general election to return to power.

By political party, support for the main opposition Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan has increased to 12.7 percent from 10.9 percent in April, while that of the Japan Innovation Party has decreased to 7.4 percent from 8.1 percent.

No opposition party other than the CDPJ had a support rate above 10 percent despite the slush funds scandal undermining public trust in the LDP. Respondents with no particular party affiliation fell to 32.3 percent from 35.2 percent.

The survey called 537 randomly selected households with eligible voters and 2,234 mobile phone numbers. It yielded responses from 427 household members and 628 mobile phone users.

Some parts of Ishikawa Prefecture affected by the Noto Peninsula earthquake on the New Year's Day were excluded from the survey.

© KYODO

©2024 GPlusMedia Inc.

21 Comments
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No opposition party other than the CDPJ had a support rate above 10 percent despite the slush funds scandal undermining public trust in the LDP.

Tax evasion scandal found a scapegoat and is fading from the headlines.

The LDP being compromised by Moonies is fading too.

Japanese need to recapt

-2 ( +9 / -11 )

No opposition party other than the CDPJ had a support rate above 10 percent despite the slush funds scandal undermining public trust in the LDP.

Tax evasion scandal found a scapegoat and is fading from the headlines.

The LDP being compromised by Moonies is fading too.

Japanese need to recapture the political engagement of the 60s .

Corrected.

-1 ( +12 / -13 )

Has Kishida turned the corner? Or can the small apparent rise in fortunes be explained by the usual error percentage in the polls? Error rates are never given in polls in Japan and it creates the idea of an accuracy which isn't really there.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

In other words, we are stuck with the LDP.

-3 ( +11 / -14 )

After the political funds scandal was revealed late last year, the support rate for Kishida's cabinet, launched in October 2021, dropped below what is widely recognized as the "danger level" of 30 percent and hit an all-time low in March at 20.1 percent.

So I take it this means that the new "danger level" is 20%, since he doesn't seem to feel in any danger. How low can you go?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Statistically, that's nonsense, especially values with decimal points. One can only say, that there might be a detectable slight upward trend under a certain confidence percentage, so that the support rate is highly probably within a certain range of about 22 to 26 percent or so.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

LOL

where can I report a HOAX?

-5 ( +6 / -11 )

You get who you vote for!

Until the Japanese get off their butts and vote these corrupt cronies out of office, nothing will change!

-3 ( +7 / -10 )

That’s a very ‘telling’ photo.

-6 ( +6 / -12 )

Kishi and company..

Please resign..

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

The numbers aren't good, when we consider that out of (approx) 2750 calls we get less than 50% responders. Out of that we only get around 36% for the top 2 major parties...

Of those who responded how many actually bothered to turn up and vote, considering that it was only 56% of eligible voters who actually turned up in 2021.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Kishida's cabinet support rate edges up

why?

wasting tax money and going on useless trips call for better approval?

that makes no sense at all.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

The problem is that there's no political party from the opposition taking advantage of this to present alternatives to the LDP policies. There's been a change on the JCP (Finally they got rid of Shii!), but not them nor Reiwa nor the CDPJ seem to be a

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The problem is that there's no political party from the opposition taking advantage of this to present alternatives to the LDP policies. There's been a change on the JCP (Finally they got rid of Shii!), but not them nor Reiwa nor the CDPJ seem to be able to take them out.

(Sorry for the double posting, I had a finger slip and pressed the post button accidentally. Maybe would be time to implement the "delete" button, Japantoday?)

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I guess when you don't do anything it's pretty easy not to mess up.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

Fantastic -- let's have a general election! But 0.242% would be more accurate IMO.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

This is Bogus !

Fake news

Kishida's approval ratings are down not up !

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

This is Bogus !

Fake news

Kishida's approval ratings are down not up !

Or, maybe it's accurate, is real news, and Kishida's approval ratings actually are up.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

The guy on the right looks ancient !!!

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Or, maybe it's accurate, is real news, and Kishida's approval ratings actually are up.

This isn't a maybe This maybe that situation !

It's bogus !

Fact

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Very low.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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