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Kishida sends offering to Yasukuni shrine for autumn festival; 2 ministers visit

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some world leaders are gathering in China at this very moment,some others are checking price of milk in japanese supermarket,sending "offerings" to japanese war criminal cemetery and making headlines from both...

-14 ( +5 / -19 )

I can't honestly see how he thinks making an offering is appropriate, the people that would like him to distance himself from Yasukuni do not take it kindly, and those that would like him to make a clear stand and visit the Shrine take the gesture as lukewarm, this makes nobody happy and will only hurt his popularity more.

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

Yasukuni is not a shrine for criminals from the Second World War (soldiers that were coerced by politicians and followed orders). It’s a shrine for people who have fought and died for Japan.

Foreigners urgently need to understand the difference and not try to push their world views on others.

3 ( +15 / -12 )

You can visit that shrine un you blue in the face. Buddah gonna magically going to answer and give to your prayers

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

I don't know why this keeps coming up as NEWS every time some government official visits the Shrine.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

Let's not forget that the emperor of this country Hirohito stopped visiting the shrine after the enshrinement of the war criminals and his descendants never visited there before trying to teach the foreigners a lesson. What the politicians are doing is right-wing virtue signalling, nothing more.

-3 ( +7 / -10 )

@Eastman Its called political Multi tasking!

some world leaders are gathering in China at this very moment,some others are checking price of milk in Japanese supermarket,sending "offerings" to Japanese war criminal cemetery and making headlines from both...

4 ( +4 / -0 )

The reason this is brought up every time is because it is a political card played by China and South Korea against Japan. This is always viewed as a problem by some Japanese media outlets that have been contaminated by China. The people are not against it.

Just like the Fukushima treated water, it is not based on any scientific basis, but is just an emotional or political card.

Since the Emperor has no personal status, he is no longer able to visit the shrine, but members of the imperial family continue to visit the shrine every year.

It would be a mistake to judge it based on political ideology, such as glorifying right-wingers.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

It's a shrine for Japanese (mostly) killed in imperialist wars starting with the Sino-Japan War of 1895 and ending with Japan's defeat in WW2.

Yasukuni is not a shrine for criminals from the Second World War (soldiers that were coerced by politicians and followed orders). It’s a shrine for people who have fought and died for Japan.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

If you don't understand why the Japanese media is covering this, you might think it's illogical.

Think about why you bother bringing it up.

If you can think logically, you should be able to see it by yourself. It's not a domestic issue.

Yasukuni Shrine is dedicated to the approximately 2.46 million people who died in domestic and international wars since 1853.

1895? Where is the information?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Tone deaf

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

JamesOct. 17  04:55 pm JST

Yasukuni is not a shrine for criminals from the Second World War (soldiers that were coerced by politicians and followed orders). It’s a shrine for people who have fought and died for Japan.

It's also a private religious institution, and as the Constitution separates government from religion politicians have every right to visit as private individuals but they have no official business there.

Foreigners urgently need to understand the difference and not try to push their world views on others.

That's what the politicians are doing by making sure these PR stunts-... sorry, visits, get plenty of media attention.

Agent_NeoOct. 17  09:56 pm JST

The reason this is brought up every time is because it is a political card played by China and South Korea against Japan. 

It's brought up because the media keep reporting these visits, which is exactly what the politicians want. You think it's not a political card for them too?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

This decision is highly controversial and has historical, political, and cultural implications.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

deanzaZZRToday  12:25 am JST

It's a shrine for Japanese (mostly) killed in imperialist wars starting with the Sino-Japan War of 1895 and ending with Japan's defeat in WW2.

Wrong. It starts with the Boshin War, a domestic civil war in 1868.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

If you think that Japanese politicians, especially the Liberal Democratic Party, are using it as a political card, think carefully about why there were no such reports before Nakasone.

Prime Minister Nakasone made the mistake of saying that for the first time, he was visiting the shrine separately from work and private life. Since then, the Emperor, who has no distinction between public and private life, has been unable to visit the shrine.

Originally, there was no such division between public and private.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

The only change that is made is government ministers not visiting or making donations.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Agent_Neo

Oct. 18 10:15 pm JST

If you think that Japanese politicians, especially the Liberal Democratic Party, are using it as a political card, think carefully about why there were no such reports before Nakasone.

I fail to see the connection.

Prime Minister Nakasone made the mistake of saying that for the first time, he was visiting the shrine separately from work and private life. Since then, the Emperor, who has no distinction between public and private life, has been unable to visit the shrine.

Emperor Hirohito stopped visiting in 1978 because priests with a revisionist agenda had secretly enshrined war criminals. It had nothing to do with Nakasone.

Originally, there was no such division between public and private.

Article 20 of the Japanese Constitution stipulates the separation of church and state.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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