politics

Organizers, festival host agree to reopen 'comfort women' exhibition

25 Comments

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A victory for freedom of expression!

-4 ( +8 / -12 )

It has nothing to do with freedom of expression. It is about justice, and Japan has nothing to be worried about. To recognize the unfortunate past will promote the friendship of the future. Japanese women were also victims, and need to be recognized too.

0 ( +9 / -9 )

It has nothing to do with freedom of expression.

This sentence is contradicted by this:

It is about justice, and Japan has nothing to be worried about. To recognize the unfortunate past will promote the friendship of the future. Japanese women were also victims, and need to be recognized too.

Hilarious!

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

Fantastic news. Won't be long before the right wing nut jobs start with the threats again. It's great to see public awareness over Japan's horrific war crimes

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

Chip Star said "How do you give recognition to the Japanese victim's of Japan's rape of Asia without freedom of expression?"

Is it a fact, or just an expression ?

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

Is it a fact, or just an expression ?

You claimed there were also Japanese women that were victims of Japan's wartime aggression and that those people needed to be recognized. You were expressing a fact.

You clearly don't understand what expression means.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

A perfect example of freedom of expression, but not a fact.

Okay. Care to answer this:

How do you give recognition to the Japanese victim's of Japan's rape of Asia without freedom of expression?

Or are you going to contribute to dodge?

Engaging Chinese people in critical discourse is similar to engaging Trumpophiles. They refuse to accept facts or answer questions that demonstrate they are incorrect.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

The exhibit will also provide visitors with an interim report on the background up to its discontinuation, according to the governor.

The 'background' is now a part of history too and anything pertinent not only up to but also after should be made clear. Anything less can lead to more suspicion and distrust.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

They should also host in Vietnam where South Koreans made some comfort women there.

6 ( +11 / -5 )

Kawamura previously incited controversy when he demanded the exhibition be shut, arguing the statue should not be displayed at a publicly funded event as its presence could give the wrong impression that Japan accepted South Korea's claim the women were forcibly taken by the Japanese military.

The mayor of a prominent Japanese city who denies and whitewashes history, without an immediate and forceful backlash from all directions.. wow.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

A victory for freedom of expression? I doubt it. It’s a victory for politicizing and using art as a means of advancing the organizers’ political views.

-1 ( +10 / -11 )

A victory for freedom of expression? I doubt it. It’s a victory for politicizing and using art as a means of advancing the organizers’ political views.

Which is expression.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

Good for them, refutes the ridiculous notion that all Japanese are whitewashing deniers of history.

Take that.

-10 ( +4 / -14 )

Good for them, refutes the ridiculous notion that all Japanese are whitewashing deniers of history.

Nobody ever claims this, except you so you can refute it.

Take that.

2 ( +10 / -8 )

agree with all of chip's posts

1 ( +7 / -6 )

Color me shocked. I had no idea freedom of expression existed till now. Cue the looney right wing reactionaries. Great way to stand up to bullying and historical denialism and revisionism

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

A victory for freedom of expression!

-9 ( +2 / -11 )

The problem is that this "concentrates" emphasis on Japanese wrongdoing "openly" and "organized" during the War, when rape and other activities were not organized but have occurred rampantly all over the world during the same war. The issue could have been to protect women from such actions during any war, Instead this "blames" Japanese of today and not those that actually did participate in it.

As with Pear Harbor, it could have been a symbol to "prevent" future atrocities and not "take" money to justify individual claims, when already the matter was considered and resolved between those who represented them (their government) and "took" huge sums of money which could have compensated those who are making claims now.

This action is but a media ploy to "discredit" the Japanese of today. That is NOT an acceptable action in any time of history.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

For those that speak of 'here and now', surely you can agree that now is the time to focus on the individuals that will imminently send death threats once again.

That and corrupt government officials' actions that aim to censor this artwork are the only crimes here.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Well, at the end of the day...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The exhibit probably shouldn't be accepted by the Aichi Triennale in the first place knowing it was going to cause some sort of outrage but they did accept it and now it should be reopened even with the limitations placed on it.

The selections for the Triennale are the business of the committee and not governments. The grant should also be restored.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

It's a relief to realize that Japan isn't China or North Korea (yet). Let's hope the Japanese continue with their experiment in "free speech".

0 ( +3 / -3 )

This controversy is a direct result of Japan’s historical decision to censor true historical facts about it’s war time behavior from it’s school textbooks nationwide. We are finally moving in the right direction of achieving social justice and unadulterated education.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

This controversy is a direct result of Japan’s historical decision to censor true historical facts about it’s war time behavior from it’s school textbooks nationwide. We are finally moving in the right direction of achieving social justice and unadulterated education.

Absolutely untrue and this myth has been proven false on this website. And no one has given one bit of evidence to back up this claim. Less than one percent of Japanese schools use controversial textbooks that revise history. The majority of them in fact do reference Japan's actions during WW2.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The 'does no wrong' crowd is unusually silent.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

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