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Around 70 Japanese lawmakers visit Yasukuni Shrine

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If you stop reporting every time someone visits that Shrine or sends a ritual offering, there would be much less hubbub

17 ( +23 / -6 )

Unwilling or unable to learn from history?

What is the lesson Japan hasn't learned? That they are never allowed to go to war again? That they are uniquely evil people? Please spell it out for us.

No surprise Japan is hated on this issue world-wide, and rightfully so.

I don't think this reflects reality.

16 ( +22 / -6 )

The war criminals should have never been interred there, it poisons the whole atmosphere. Otherwise, who says Japanese people aren't allowed to honor their fallen soldiers? You can make the argument about what they were fighting for, but at the end of the day, 95%+ of the people that shrine honors were just regular folks who got drafted and taken from their families. They deserve the same respect as any fallen soldier.

13 ( +17 / -4 )

Are they there in an official capacity or in a personal one? if its personal then they have nothing to be ashamed of, its their choice and their right to attend. If its official as representatives of the government, then perhaps some decorum should have been expressed, but its by no means wrong! A countries leaders paying respects to those that lost their lives fighting for what they believed in and for their homeland is an act that is played out all over the world at cenotaphs and memorials.

Yes there are war criminals interned here, and that is unfortunate, but the souls of the remainder of those there, still deserve the right to be remembered. To forget them dishonours them and makes their sacrifice worthless.

9 ( +27 / -18 )

Since the war criminals were enshrined at Yasukuni the Showa emperor stopped visiting.

The current emperor has never visited and the emperor to be almost sure won't either.

Take that you right wing emperor worshippers.

Bravo post war emperors of Japan!

9 ( +17 / -8 )

CaptDingleHeimer

Agreed absolutely!

War is a massive tragety and many times an injustice by the rich and powerful sending the poor and weak to their deaths to fight in their self enriching wars

8 ( +12 / -4 )

M3M3M3

Well said. It takes an actual

knowledge of hiatory to understand what happens around the world and why. Some folks here have absolutely no scope, knowledge, or ability to be able to accept something that conflicts with what they think (want) to be right.

6 ( +11 / -5 )

And if your imagination cannot see the faces of those you will sacrifice, you MUST visit the Naval Academy at Etajima and the Kamikaze museum and see ALL of faces of the most beautiful and enthusiastic youth one could possible hope to see standing in front of the unarmed, junk aitcraft that their fat, useless, corrupt generals ordered them into to give their nascent lives to achieve nothing except be subtracted from Japan's best hope for the future. And, if you don't cry looking at those wonderful faces and those last letters and knowing how useless their humble sacrifices were and how damaging to Japan's future that they were removed and the generals remained and retired to live out their diseased lives and raise diseased children such as the 70 above who celebrate not the dead but all of the future deaths they unconsciously hope to facilitate. Go to Etajima, look at those young men and understand the pedigree of those who did this to them. It passes directly through these 70 for sure. Screw Yasukuni. Etajima is THE TRUE memorial to Nihon's lost children. Go there and you'll see. I cry now thinking of my visit twenty years ago and all of those beautiful children...

4 ( +8 / -4 )

how many nippon gakai badges can you count.. 1,2,3,4....

4 ( +5 / -1 )

You can’t expect another nation to behave in a way that you may consider right all the time.

Japan has the right to respect its war dead imo as any nation would.

If you ask a murdered in cold blood Arab what they think about some of the guys in Arlington national cemetary, no doubt the entire nation would rightfully call those men war criminals.

3 ( +13 / -10 )

How convenient, a prepared list of the 70 people who most need to be retired from power of any sort in NIhon if Nihon is serious about not becoming a radioactive wasteland when next we go at each other in full psychotic mode. The next war will simply be the last war (II) magnified 100 times. Nihon's only role in this next war, regardless of what corrupt changes trumpAbe is able to swindle the Hihonjin to accept, will be to sacrifice itself on the altar of America, all of its young people turned to ash and the islands uninhabitable even if there were still Nihonjin left to suffer there. These 70 people are the 'Patient Zeros' of Japan's worst disease, its elite, and, in a sane world, would be imprisoned as enemies of all Humanity, not just Japan. And, if sanity were to infect the world at large, America has prisons enough for all of the psychopaths who are now running and ruining our tiny piece of the Universe. But Humanity's derangement is 70-60,000 years old and innate in us. And 15 billion Human mouths in the next 50 years? There are times when 'old' and 'already lived a life' is a good thing...and it's now. Good luck, youngsters. You be sure to hear and obey Uncle abe and his rightwing Orcs and your 'retirement' is assured.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Why do they feel the need to honor A class war criminals? I just don't get the point.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

smithinjapan

”Japan is hated” by those who read their nations history books, believe it all hook and sinker and then run around believing they are the “good guys” and others are “bad”.

WWII would have never been fought in Asia had it not been for British colonist enslaving the continent and starting drug wars and murdering millions for generations.

2 ( +14 / -12 )

CaptainDingle, I don't need to comment except to say, amen. You got it right.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Their own Emperor and progeny will never go to Yasukuni. It is that leadership they should follow, fully accepting the war but walking a new path towards peace as an ongoing perspective, not upholding the grocery list of A class war criminals and their right-wing worldview.

A Japan without Yasukuni awaits the world past this layer, and it is for a new Japan we must continue to hope for everyday to one day emerge

1 ( +12 / -11 )

M3M3M3Today  06:08 pm JST

Unwilling or unable to learn from history?

What is the lesson Japan hasn't learned? That they are never allowed to go to war again? That they are uniquely evil people? Please spell it out for us.

I think the basic lesson to be learned was that when it came to waging a war the Japanese were so terrible at it that it all ended in unmitigated disaster. Just imagine those LDP old boys in the photo trying to run another one, it certainly wouldn't take them four years to lose it because they're useless at everything except conning dopey old folk into voting for them. The whole thing would be all over in four months.

thepersoniamnowToday  07:36 pm JST

WWII would have never been fought in Asia had it not been for British colonist enslaving the continent and starting drug wars and murdering millions for generations.

True, Britain's imperial past is not always cause for pride. But there weren't many as wholeheartedly into enslaving other Asians and profiting from the drug trade as PM Abe's dear departed grandpa Nobusuke Kishi. Spare us the rhetoric about how Japan was aiming to free Asia from western tyranny, the Japanese militarists and oligarchs just wanted to keep on doing exactly the same thing.

1 ( +10 / -9 )

Of course controversial always & both Korea & China have an obligation to share their concern. That’s a given. But to criticize the visit simply as a glorification of the militarists is also not rational. Perhaps some members may hold this view but a stretch to say all do.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

sf2k: "Their own Emperor and progeny will never go to Yasukuni. It is that leadership they should follow, fully accepting the war but walking a new path towards peace as an ongoing perspective, not upholding the grocery list of A class war criminals and their right-wing worldview."

I know! I think that's one of the things that angers these right-wing lunatics and politicians the most -- that they purport to hold the Emperor as a god-like figure, but complain about him and his family because they won't stand behind the same garbage ideals that saw the nation and the IJA nuked and obliterated way back when. The Emperor has it right, and it makes them seethe... so much so the head priest of this shrine just got canned for dissing his god, who is so disgusted by their way of thinking and acting he won't even set foot near the place.

1 ( +10 / -9 )

Winners of wars have the ability to call the defeated "war criminals" which is ironic; so what do you call the people responsible for ordering the firebombing civilians in cities in Japan and Germany? Oh wait, we called it "a strategy for demoralizing the population to shorten the war."

1 ( +4 / -3 )

No surprise Japan is hated on this issue world-wide, and rightfully so.

I rather doubt this is the case. Do the 1.3 billion people in India have any interest in this? Are people in Central and Latin Americans countries interested in this? Even in countries such as Indonesia and the Philippines that suffered under Japanese control there is little interest in Yasukuni.

 Britain's imperial past is not always cause for pride. But there weren't many as wholeheartedly into enslaving other Asians and profiting from the drug trade as PM Abe's dear departed grandpa Nobusuke Kishi.

Not what histories of the opium trade in China say. Britain not only pioneered the opium trade in China but financed the administration of Hong Kong with taxes on opium. Britain fought two wars with China that all standard texts refer to as the Opium Wars because essentially the only issue was British control over the opium trade.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

According to Japanese oligarchy logic, this visit is acceptable behaviour.  The oligarchy that was in power at the beginning of the 20th century are still calling the shots.  Examples of this can be seen throughout this entire society.  Some more visible than others.  And as long as the populace keep kowtowing to the powers that be, nothing will change.  But it is hard to blame the people of Japan as they have been doing this for thousands of years.  Only until the masses rise up to the blue bloods will things finally begin to change.  Unfortunately, it may take another thousand years before this is realized.

S

1 ( +2 / -1 )

klausdorth: "Unwilling or unable to learn from history?"

Definitely unwilling, although if you asked them about history they'd say it never happened, and when you addressed it in another country they'd demand you follow the new Japanese version, tie sister-city ties, and whine about how you're attacking their culture.

And on cue, these guys tomorrow will be playing victim and demanding "comfort women" statues be torn down, the UN not publish letters and papers about Nanjing, etc.

0 ( +21 / -21 )

Vernon WattsToday  06:42 am JST

Winners of wars have the ability to call the defeated "war criminals" which is ironic; so what do you call the people responsible for ordering the firebombing civilians in cities in Japan and Germany? Oh wait, we called it "a strategy for demoralizing the population to shorten the war."

It is, however, viewed with repugnance now and even Churchill said in retrospect that it shouldn't happen again. I doubt any of those politicians visiting Yasukuni Shrine will ever voice such sentiments about anything the Japanese did during WW2. I also suspect that had the roles been reversed the Japanese military leadership would have done exactly the same thing.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Like clockwork. Tax increase proposed, Abe off to Europe or plans a trip, Abe makes a Yasukuni offering, lawmakers then follow. We were at least spared them wearing their IJA uniforms from home

This is why nothing changes

-1 ( +21 / -22 )

But to criticize the visit simply as a glorification of the militarists is also not rational. 

And yet that's my main criticism. The shrine is dedicated to those who died serving the emperor. Not to those who died in the Tokyo fire bombings or anyone else who suffered the consequences of the military regime.

However, I don't single out Japan for this criticism. Here in the UK, the November remembrance events seem to have taken on a greater degree of "military reverence" from what I remember as a kid. I was taught such events were to remember all who suffered from wars. But these days it's all about "heroes" and those who died "serving their country".

A song for these moments:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M-38PB_5ozc

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I have a feeling Korea would be upset at them visiting the shrine even if the war criminals weren't enshrined there...

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

many citizen did not want to go to war but have no choice. let bygone be bygone.

a gift for today: imagine by john lennon.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

70 members, so about 10% of the government are IJA supporters of old Imperial Japan or their lackeys like Nippon Kaigi. Too many to be sure, but it's more important that 90% didn't go. That should be the news story: 90% of government think Yasukuni should be avoided just like the Emperor, etc etc. It's all about the reporting and a Nippon Kaigi enabling media

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Unwilling or unable to learn from history?

-2 ( +20 / -22 )

See they are continuing an Isolationist policy towards their neighbors. I wonder if the visit counts as work? Do they loose a days pay? Or do politicians get a Yaskuni day in their contract?

-2 ( +17 / -19 )

Kobe White Bar OwnerToday  06:24 am JST

how many nippon gakai badges can you count.. 1,2,3,4....

I think those badges are something to do with rescuing the abductees in North Korea.

Mahesvara-of-JapanToday  03:53 am JST

This is a very symbolic day at Yasukuni considering that even opposition lawmakers are going there. Please rest in peace warriors of Japan. May your sacrifices bring forth an era of peace!

Those "opposition" lawmakers are all from the Japan Innovation Party and Kibo No To, i.e. they all have pretty much the same mindset as the LDP and they're courting the same right-wing voters. Anyone there from the CDPJ or the SDP?

Ganbare Japan!Today  06:09 am JST

It's their right to pay respect.

In private. Not as part of a vulgar, insincere spectacle intended to win them votes. Notice how it's only right-wing politicians who see any need to visit the shrine in large groups in their best formal suits with all the media watching?

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Yes, readers, please note that the blue badges you see on the lapels of many Japanese politicians signify the issue of the North Korean abduction of Japanese citizens, not Nippon Kaigi.

No surprise Japan is hated on this issue world-wide, and rightfully so. These guys are probably even loathed by their own families, who they will turn around and blame.

-3 ( +20 / -23 )

joyriding - who says anyone is forgetting the unfortunate souls enslaved by the Imperial War Inc and sacrificed as lambs to the slaughter?

I have never heard or read that those men & women who were mere chattel, nay fodder for the whims and ploys of the militarists, were ever to be forgotten. Where did you get that idea?

And re their sacrifice - it was worthless. They suffered immeasurably, their families suffered immeasurably, the country suffered immeasurably - for what?

For what? For the wily revisionists to use them decades on, to prop up their twisted agendas and act their pantomine of peace.

No they were sacrificed for nil, save the glory of the suited ones.

This show of "faith & respect" soils the names of the millions.

-3 ( +14 / -17 )

bullfighterToday 11:57 am JST

* "Britain's imperial past is not always cause for pride. But there weren't many as wholeheartedly into enslaving other Asians and profiting from the drug trade as PM Abe's dear departed grandpa Nobusuke Kishi."*

Not what histories of the opium trade in China say. Britain not only pioneered the opium trade in China but financed the administration of Hong Kong with taxes on opium.

Sorry, is there some confusion here? I did say not cause for pride. I do actually know all about our inglorious involvement in the opium trade, thank you, and I have no intention of condoning or denying it. PM Abe's grandfather was deeply involved in the opium trade, forced labour and organised crime when he was running Manchukuo, but has Abe ever admitted a single bad thing about him?

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

All of them with the obligatory, insincere faces.

-4 ( +10 / -14 )

JAPAN should totally ignore all concerns and disappointments expressed by these powers that want to make JAPAN TIMID year after year over the visit of lawmakers to Yasukuni shrine These countries have no business to bash Japan over the incidents taken place decades back in the past.

-4 ( +8 / -12 )

But to criticize the visit simply as a glorification of the militarists is also not rational. Perhaps some members may hold this view but a stretch to say all do.

hadagree, no members hold militarist view.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

This is a very symbolic day at Yasukuni considering that even opposition lawmakers are going there. Please rest in peace warriors of Japan. May your sacrifices bring forth an era of peace!

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

It's their right to pay respect. The millions enshrined paid the sacrifice for modern, strong and peace living Japan.

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

Michael JacksonToday 05:14 pm JST

If you stop reporting every time someone visits that Shrine or sends a ritual offering, there would be much less hubbub

Good point. I bet they wouldn't bother at all if they didn't think it was getting media attention and making them look electable in the eyes of gullible right-wingers.

-6 ( +10 / -16 )

joyridingonthetitanicToday 05:12 pm JST

Are they there in an official capacity or in a personal one? if its personal then they have nothing to be ashamed of, its their choice and their right to attend.

Except that it looks as if took a bit of time and effort to arrange for seventy of them to all go at the same time, which I hope they weren't doing when they were on the clock, they're all dressed up to the nines and I'm guessing they made sure the press knew all about it. All that's a bit unnecessary for personal visits, so I suspect they did it for the PR. I also suspect they're all loathsome old hacks who would happily see Yasukuni bulldozed over tomorrow if they thought that would win them more votes.

If its official as representatives of the government, then perhaps some decorum should have been expressed, but its by no means wrong!

Yes, it is. Yasukuni Shrine is a private religious institution and the Constitution of Japan separates government and religion.

A countries leaders paying respects to those that lost their lives fighting for what they believed in and for their homeland is an act that is played out all over the world at cenotaphs and memorials.

Cenotaphs and memorials that are publicly owned or arranged. Japan has those too, so Japanese politicians can attend them if they want to pretend to pay respects to anyone.

-7 ( +13 / -20 )

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