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Japan to maintain sanctions on Russia as Ukraine war drags on

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Be careful Japan. You lack natural resources of any note. America doesnt have that problem. Beware of blowback.

-1 ( +13 / -14 )

How about the Sakhalin 2 oil and gas project?

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Japan has abundant solar, wind, hydro, and geothermal power potential. It just needs a catalyst like high fossil fuel costs. It is not smart to be overreliant on unstable trading partners.

Be careful Japan. You lack natural resources of any note. America doesnt have that problem. Beware of blowback.

5 ( +14 / -9 )

Japan to maintain sanctions on Russia...

Except of course when the Interests of Japan could be damaged, like in Sakhalin, in which case Russia will have full support from the Japanese government, it is very easy to talk the talk if there is no intention to walk the walk.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Yes, of course, I believe everything. And I can’t imagine harder sanctions than those including further Sakhalin-II supply and supermarket shelves full with Russian labeled fish. lol

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

The West seems to have gotten itself into a massive reddit-like echochamber devoid of views educated on the reality in the East.

Russia is capable of being self-sufficient in virtually all essential goods (food and energy) and has the mid-term expertise to manufacture the random parts from the west that is does not currently have (for example most of the domestic aviation operations are done using Russian-made planes, and only flights to countries that have not approved Russian planes are operated using Western-made planes, so Russia will be able to self-manufacture the parts required to operate Western-made planes in the mid-term future). The generic sanctions will have the effect of giving Russia a valid excuse to place tit-for-tat generic sanctions on the West where there are vast issues with food and energy independence. Those who say that it's Europe's fault for not becoming more independent from Russia forget that the main threat for petroleum sanctions was and still is from OPEC and the Middle East, so where exactly is the gas supposed to come form?

Furthermore the majority of Asia has maintained a plethora of ties with Russia (including South Korea and Japan), and all to the major Asian geopolitical powers (except South Korea and Japan) have expressed willingness to maintain cordial relations with Russia. The US has been unable to win a cold war with China in the past, and when was the last time the US won a war in Asia? The idea that the US will be able to win such a non-interventionist war with Russia so easily is silly and all this war will achieve is a stronger China.

-2 ( +10 / -12 )

buua - shhh… cancelling the Sakhalin 2 deal would mean real financial losses for the government’s buddies…

They like to talk big, but blood stained Siberian gas is just too profitable to refuse.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

Ukrainain do not have fate that this war,will be over immediately,lots of them are driven by nationalist,why should an somebody that support Ukraine,are so bullish that they will be victorious,as an American,lots of American politican are just as delusional,feel that can solve Ukraine problems,when they ignore American problems

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Ubesh, Russian know they have to destroy Ukraine,too have any role as being a Superpower in the World,the war is not about Ukraine now,it about Russian maintain a deterrent,lots of wars the US fought were out of spite and revenge

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Russia is capable of being self-sufficient in virtually all essential goods (food and energy) and has the mid-term expertise to manufacture the random parts from the west that is does not currently have (for example most of the domestic aviation operations are done using Russian-made planes, and only flights to countries that have not approved Russian planes are operated using Western-made planes, so Russia will be able to self-manufacture the parts required to operate Western-made planes in the mid-term future). 

I'd kinda half agree with you, Ubesh. No, Russia cannot service the Western-built planes in a way that will certify them to fly in the EU - 100% of its EU-certified parts are made in Germany. Russia will for the time being have to satisfy itself with flying to Slovenia and Albania, where connections are available. Or travel overland via Finland.

But yes, Russians are adept at doing without, though they've grown rusty at it over the last two decades of being as free to travel as Westerners. Sea-loving Russians who are not really rich will have to do with staycations for the foreseeable future.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

@Laguna The point was that the generic sanctions against Russia are primarily affecting non-essential goods because the country is self-sufficient in agriculture and natural resources, and it has the expertise to replace most of the technical knowledge affected by the sanctions in the mid-term future.

The West is being more severely impacted because it is not self-sufficient in essential goods such as agriculture or natural resources.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Ubesh, American economy is self sustaining , Russian is getting steamed roll

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

so Russia will be able to self-manufacture the parts required to operate Western-made planes in the mid-term future).

This is highly unlikely. Producing system critical parts (as opposed to seats, bathroom doors, etc) for Boeing or Airbus aircraft aircraft isn’t something Russia, or other countries for that matter, can just start doing on their own. Its not just a matter of having engineers on hand, these things require incredibly complex supply chains and high tech components that Russia just can’t produce on its own.

The generic sanctions will have the effect of giving Russia a valid excuse to place tit-for-tat generic sanctions on the West where there are vast issues with food and energy independence. 

The West isn’t dependent on Russia for food, and its only a few countries like Germany that are dependent on it for energy, something they are quickly moving to permanently end. Russia’s leverage in energy is quickly dissipating as a result. It’s also irrelevant that sanctions on Russia give it an excuse to put sanctions on these things anyway, it doesn’t need an excuse to do that.

Those who say that it's Europe's fault for not becoming more independent from Russia forget that the main threat for petroleum sanctions was and still is from OPEC and the Middle East, so where exactly is the gas supposed to come form?

No, the main threat is still from Russia. Saudi Arabia’s armies aren’t running amock attacking European countries. Saudi Arabia isn’t issuing veiled threats to use nuclear weapons against Europe. Nor is it or any other country in that region ever going to be in a position to do these things.

So middle eastern gas is way better.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Who is the sanctions regime hurting more? Japan or Russia? It's highly likely the sanctions are actually helping Russia. The Russians are certainly making more money as a result. having some troubles with import substitution but are methodically getting in top of those issues.

I know it doesn't matter. The brokeback regime here does what USA tyrants tell them and USA is suffering much less from the sanctions than Japan and Europe.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

There are many essential items Russia cannot manufacture.

There are absolutely no items at all Russia can't manufacture itself or buy from China or India.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

@rainyday @Redstorm

This is highly unlikely. Producing system critical parts (as opposed to seats, bathroom doors, etc) for Boeing or Airbus aircraft aircraft isn’t something Russia, or other countries for that matter, can just start doing on their own. Its not just a matter of having engineers on hand, these things require incredibly complex supply chains and high tech components that Russia just can’t produce on its own.

Russia is not self-sufficient in everything it needs. The national air carrier is stripping parts off its planes to keep a fleet flying. The war has taken out many of its armories and now looking to use Soviet stocks.

Russia is one of the few countries that are capable of manufacturing said parts on a mid-term basis since it has a strong aircraft industry that even China is trying to copy. The majority of the world does not have native aircraft building knowledge so buys from the West or Russia.

The West isn’t dependent on Russia for food, and its only a few countries like Germany that are dependent on it for energy, something they are quickly moving to permanently end. Russia’s leverage in energy is quickly dissipating as a result. It’s also irrelevant that sanctions on Russia give it an excuse to put sanctions on these things anyway, it doesn’t need an excuse to do that.

The West needs the fertilizer from Russia, and Ukraine/Russia is the wheat basket of the world, and most of the West IS dependent on Russia for gas except for a handful of countries with natural resources such as Canada, USA and Australia who cannot export to Europe for biological/technical reasons on gas transport. The high cost of transport is also affecting the import of food from overseas - most western countries are not self-sufficient in food or energy so cannot artificially lower the price of everyday goods through currency devaluation etc...

Russia has been doing tit-for-tat stuff since the Soviet era so not sure how you came to that conclusion.

No, the main threat is still from Russia. Saudi Arabia’s armies aren’t running amock attacking European countries. Saudi Arabia isn’t issuing veiled threats to use nuclear weapons against Europe. Nor is it or any other country in that region ever going to be in a position to do these things.

The Middle East is still the main threat in terms of petroleum sanctions and threats to national energy security - the previous sanctions were a result of the Israel conflict which is widely considered to be part of the Eurosphere. Russia is part of the OPEC+ you know.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Redstorm,you are right, Russian oil and gas industry ,will soon suffer,when American oil support companies left Russia Google Halliburton Russia Google Baker Hughes Russia

yeah because Russia doesn't have the technology for fracking....... Even though it was invented in the Soviet Union during WW2.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Japan needs to protect its citizens and nation…following Biden in the insane proxy war with Russia using Ukrainian as an excuse will be a disaster for Japan!

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Only 1% of Japanese wheat imports come from Ukraine and non from Russia. Japan imports zero fertilizer from Ukraine or Russia. Canada provides the majority of Japan's potash fertilizer supply.

Asia eats rice and not wheat. The main issue is access to fertilizer and that was one of the reasons that Sri Lanka went disastrously 100% organic. Any wheat reduction in the global markets primarily affects the bread-eating West.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

We also eat or use a lot of wheat too.

Japan imports 5.8-5.9 million tonnes of wheat each year and imports contribute roughly 90% of total food wheat consumption. Japan buys over 95% of its total wheat requirements from only three markets.

Yes but this is what I mean by essential goods. Japanese people as a whole do not need a significant amount of wheat and it is readily replaceable with substitute foods in Japanese cuisine. Russia is capable of feeding itself and heating itself so will not be severely hurt by the sanctions at a basic level. Bread is almost a luxury/novelty cuisine in Japan. If wheat prices were to rise that Japanese people will stop buying wheat, which they are because of a lack of fertilizer and wheat globally, but if rice were to rise then Japanese people will still want to continue buying rice. But wheat is an essential good for the West and a lack of wheat would cause widespread suffering in western countries.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Redstorm, Russian do have the capacity to make Japanese lives miserable,by threat and intimidation,they do have a presence on Japan island,with missile

0 ( +2 / -2 )

We are big consumers of wheat noodles, bread, and beer. There are no real substitutes for wheat.

I actually forgot about wheat noodles so the premise about food security in Japan is incorrect, but still applicable to most of South East Asia and South Asia. I have only ever met one Japanese people who eats bread for breakfast despite living here for around ten years - usually is raw egg and 2 balls of rice.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Japan is not food secure. Over 30 years reduced from about 60% to 40%. 60% of our food is imported.

I read somewhere that Japan considered rice security to be very important, and that was where I probably got the idea that Japan did not need wheat from. I personally rarely have a use for a wheat based product except for breadcrumbs.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

*Russia is one of the few countries that are capable of manufacturing said parts on a mid-termbasis since it has a strong aircraft industry that even China is trying to copy. The majority of the world does not have native aircraft building knowledge so buys from the West or Russia.*

Yes, they can build parts for Russian aircraft, that is NOT the same as being able to build system critical parts for Boeing or Airbus aircraft on their own. Russia is going to cannibalize its existing aircraft by those manufacturers for parts, and once it runs out of those it’ll be using only its own aircraft.

The West needs the fertilizer from Russia, and Ukraine/Russia is the wheat basket of the world, and most of the West IS dependent on Russia for gas except for a handful of countries with natural resources such as Canada, USA and Australia who cannot export to Europe for biological/technical reasons on gas transport. 

Most of the “West” is not dependent on Russian energy. Its not just the US, Canada and Australia, most of Europe (UK, France, etc) gets most of its energy (soon to be all of its energy) elsewhere too.

For the parts that are dependent, like Germany, they have about a one year transition period which is tough, but after that they’ll be rid of Russia. That transition will be way harder on Russia, which can’t easily sell that gas to other markets. Russia needed the West way more than the West needed Russia.

The high cost of transport is also affecting the import of food from overseas - most western countries are not self-sufficient in food or energy so cannot artificially lower the price of everyday goods through currency devaluation etc...

Yup, food inflation exists. That isn’t the same as the West being dependent on Russia for food.

The Middle East is still the main threat in terms of petroleum sanctions and threats to national energy security - the previous sanctions were a result of the Israel conflict which is widely considered to be part of the Eurosphere. Russia is part of the OPEC+ you know.

Not saying that the Middle East is a reliable source, but the last time they upended energy markets like this was the 70s. And, as I said before, they aren’t using their armies to wage a war of aggression in Eastern Europe or anything like that, which makes them relatively way more reliable than Russia.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I love how they announce this a DAY after announcing they are still in on the gas projects with Russia. Which is it? Can't have both.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I love how they announce this a DAY after announcing they are still in on the gas projects with Russia. Which is it? Can't have both.

Clearly they can have both, because they just did it. I'd ask what you're missing, but clearly what you're missing is the point.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Redstorm, Russian only fear the US,lots of these countries always postering, huffing and puffing , but fall back behind the US ,as long as you have an American willing to be protect ,you can feel safe

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Nice to see Japan willing to keep it's sanctions on Russia and maintain the stance that the invasion of Ukraine is wrong and Russia needs to be punished for it's illegal actions.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Peter14,the US is the only thing standing, between Russia and European domination, Russian have showed how incompetent they are, imagine fighting a well armed and trained army,that will fight ,them seeing the white of their eyes

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Better to lose the possibility of recovering my northern territories and being a US lapdog who can abandon me to my fate when I am sinking..

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

A move Japan will learn to regret. Russia is a neighbour and friend, not to mention a massive trading partner.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Bad idea, these sanctions.

Who ends up having to deal with the negative impacts on a daily basis?

Kishidumb and his buddies?

Heck, NO.

It's the average Joe (YOU) who has to scrounge around to find cheap food products, fill up the car less, pass up on that trip with your family, use water, gas and electricity even more sparingly than before, etc.

The fat cats at Nagata-cho don't give 2 hoots about your pain, because its YOURS and not THEIRS.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Japan is not food secure. Over 30 years reduced from about 60% to 40%. 60% of our food is imported.

You're right.

If I recall correctly, Japan's food self-sufficiency rate was 80% or so in back in 1989.

Now, it's something like 37%.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

These sanctions have been really good for the Russian economy.

Russia is mostly self sufficent. Plenty of wheat, Corn, buckwheat, sunflower oil, fertilizers, rare gases for production in semi coductors, major supplier of Titanium, plenty of gas, oil, vegetables, minerals in general, exporter of military hardware, Nuclear power plants etc.

Go look at the shops in Moscow and see the abundant food on display with all well dressed people walking around.

The populations of the friendly countries that Russia deals with far exceeds the populations of the gang of seven.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Japan acts like "little pregnant-little virgin"lady.

Its about time to DECIDE.

option one-we act in name of USA interests, we go for antirussian sanctions,will bring economy to ruins as european "politicians" do and will leave Sakhalin 2 project as well

option2-we act in name of JAPANESE interests,we go for Sakhalin 2 deal,we scrap antirussian sanctions and we keep our economy afloat

that as simple as is folks.

You cant attend two weddings at the same time Fumio.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

The sanctions hurt the west, EU particularly, more than to Russia.

Russia sell natural resources, grains, oil, gas, etc. that will always have buyers.

And the winter is coming, after bad harvests this summer due to the draughts. It's gonna be a wild ride, at least Japan wasn't brain-dead to quit Sakhalin2

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

YrralToday 03:36 am JST

Peter14,the US is the only thing standing, between Russia and European domination,

Sorry Larry, but I disagree. NATO without the US would still stop Russia from European domination. Their forces are larger, their technology is superior and they still have a nuclear deterrent through UK and France. Russian forces have proven their tactics are decades behind European forces, and they are simply no match for a Europe united.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

AndyToday 07:57 am JST

A move Japan will learn to regret. Russia is a neighbour and friend,

A friend? But it didnt return the Northern territories while the US returned all taken territory. That make the US a friend and Russia (still no peace treaty) an enemy.

not to mention a massive trading partner.

Trade with pariah Russia is on the decline for all nations with a sense of justice and morality.

And that is no great loss for anyone.

Tom SanToday 09:15 am JST

Bad idea, these sanctions.

Who ends up having to deal with the negative impacts on a daily basis?

It's the average Joe (YOU) who has to scrounge around to find cheap food products, fill up the car less, pass up on that trip with your family, use water, gas and electricity even more sparingly than before, etc.

As an average Joe, I would rather face a little financial pain to support the right of Ukraine and to make life harder for Russia to supply its murderous invasion force. It also helps the average Ivan forced to fight when they would rather be home with families in Russia than dying for Putin's gory glory conquest.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

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