politics

Osaka metropolis plan rejected in referendum for 2nd time

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Accurate decision.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Had the people been guaranteed lower local taxation and quality of present services or better then they might have voted ‘yes’-they weren’t, so they didn’t ...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Good.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Why not just do this now, separating these services between the city and the prefecture? Why does the city need to be broken up to reduce redundancy?

My city is in Osaka-fu. And, the two governments co-exist just fine, as they appear to in the other cities in the prefecture. Just do the same with Osaka-shi.

Hashimoto said right after the result that things indeed have improved and the two governments are cooperating better so it hasn't been a total loss. To what extent is hard to tell, though.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Are you saying Reiwa Shinsengumi is also conservative for not agreeing with the metropolitan plan?

I don't know what they were saying about it, but probably yes. The Communists were opposed as well. And I regard them as conservative (leftist conservatives). They never want to do anything new, but oppose change.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

...the special wards would have taken care of the provision of welfare, education and other basic services, while leaving wide-area services such as infrastructure to the prefectural government.

Proponents said the measure would lead to cost-effective governance by eliminating duplication of work by the Osaka prefectural and city governments.

Why not just do this now, separating these services between the city and the prefecture? Why does the city need to be broken up to reduce redundancy?

My city is in Osaka-fu. And, the two governments co-exist just fine, as they appear to in the other cities in the prefecture. Just do the same with Osaka-shi.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Why was Komeito in Osaka for?

Because it's a national party with lots of supporters in Kansai?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

fxgaiToday  05:21 pm JST

They are rightist for sure, but being right and being conservative are two different things.

It is precisely because they are conservative (not wanting to change anything) that the LDP was against the proposal.

Are you saying Reiwa Shinsengumi is also conservative for not agreeing with the metropolitan plan?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Marcelito actually the heisei era can still be used in companies, less in administration.

New PM did not change anything in all companies and administrations of Japan.

Japan needs huge and urgent reforms such as family and school support, decreasing debts of the country etc. than to fight how to spell Osaka prefecture.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

They should never allow it to happen. If it is not broken, why fix it? There are ulterior motives behind it. It is certainly not for the benefit of citizens.

By calling it a metropolis, the whole prefecture acquires an equal status as far as taxation of property and appraisal value of both land and buildings. In the end, it is an added burden on everybody. And people only think about losing identity.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

They literally did not seem to know anything about law and governance, let alone basic market principles like competition.

Indeed, they are not market-oriented at all.

Recall the LDP has recently been handing out masks to everyone in the country (enriching whoever supplied those crappy masks) and setting prices for mobile phone contracts.

They also believe that they are responsible for growing the economy by borrowing money we don't have and spending it - as opposed to the residents of the country being the engine of economic activity.

Anyway, really, really sad news. The status quo won again. The vile bureaucratic tapeworms came out of their mud hole to make sure these pesky reformists don't take away their mud.

Amen, dear sibling.

Honestly, at this point, it's easy to lose hope for this country.

With a once-in-300-years scale crisis, change will come eventually.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Ishin is a rightist/conservative party.

They are rightist for sure, but being right and being conservative are two different things.

It is precisely because they are conservative (not wanting to change anything) that the LDP was against the proposal.

On the other hand, Ishin is progressive/reformist in the sense that they want to make changes to have things improved. I know this well, as I am of this ilk myself.

Ironically, their popular governing in Osaka may have worked against the proposal, as voters regarded things as working sufficiently, with Ishin controlling both layers of the bureaucracy.

This is a chance lost for Japan, which desperately needs reforms in many areas. 23 wards in Tokyo is too many. The Osaka reform proposal could have been a big catalyst for similar moves here.

Ah well :(

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

@ IloveCoffee

One of the best posts I've seen on here in quite a while.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Marcelito: "Seriously....did you ask the same question when Japan changed to Reiwa era or a new PM gets elected?"

Actually, a lot of people who thought this was a stupid idea (to form a new Osaka) DID ask why we need to continue the Gengo system beyond as a quaint custom, and not just formally use the Western (solar) calendar for all things official, given the waste and confusion.

But place your bets, guys... how long until they try it again despite the government saying, "We will absolutely listen to the people"? I predict early next year before they start saying they "Will make the people understand this time".

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Changing one kanji would cost billions in the administration, shipping companies and so on....is there anything else more important than that right now such a education, supporting families, old people, health ???

This sounds like unfounded, ridiculous fear-mongering. Why does it seem so familiar? Oh, wait, the entire "no" campaign was like this!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

marcelitoToday  08:41 am JST

It's about being pro-reform or anti- reform instead of blindly saying I will not support anything party A is suggesting because they are left or right.

I would say it's more about "this reform is good" vs "this reform is BS".

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Changing one kanji would cost billions in the administration, shipping companies and so on....is there anything else more important than that right now such a education, supporting families, old people, health ???

Seriously....did you ask the same question when Japan changed to Reiwa era or a new PM gets elected? ...oh gosh, the cost of all those letterheads, business cards, calendars...etc. Imagine how much more the admin duplication in Osaka costs atm.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

therougouToday  12:04 pm JST

10s/20s are more likely not to have an opinion and just vote as their parents told them, so this really doesn't say much.

Hahaha

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Changing one kanji would cost billions in the administration, shipping companies and so on....is there anything else more important than that right now such a education, supporting families, old people, health ???

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

This has to be the first article I've ever read about a referendum that doesn't give the result. It was Yes 49.4% No 50.6% with a majority of 17,000 votes. The previous referendum had a similarly tight margin.

If you look at the geographical split, central Osaka, Umeda down to Namba with the business district in between were all Yes. The poorer parts of the city down the sides and in the south voted No.

I think Osaka has just flipped from its population increasing to decreasing. With Covid-19 cracking open a door to more (not necessarily lots of) teleworking, you would expect this trend to continue. Challenging times lie ahead. One of the arguments I heard were "we must retain the historic name Osaka-shi!", but I doubt that in itself will change very much.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The people opposed to the plan evidently feared the loss of "identity" as Osaka City, and that the politicians could not be trusted to ensure the social-welfare benefits that they have been receiving from the city would continue.

Perhaps loss of identity was the official reason, but Osakans are famous for arguing over every 1 yen. So no doubt the fear-mongering instilled into them by the "no" campaigners' lies about electric bills going up, etc., played a part in this decision. It's amazing it was even this close, when you think about it.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

10s/20s voted No more than 30s/40s so it's not as simple as "Young vs Old" either.

10s/20s are more likely not to have an opinion and just vote as their parents told them, so this really doesn't say much. In the end of the day, the young lose out. The older people who worked through the bubble-era with big salaries and retirement packages will suck the poor young dry for decades to come.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

This was rightly rejected because people do not WANT to live in an amalgamated city, where resources and money pour INTO the city but nothing comes out, and control of local townships giving to people in the city who have never set foot in them never usually works out well. I do think localities can cut down on government waste, but that can be said just as easily for the top, and this is the second official referendum, with a third vote on it under Hashimoto, and how much has it cost in taxes so far? Something like $8M + each time? Start by cutting that and listening to the people instead of pushing it on us again and again until you get what you want.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

"We have lost because I failed to (convince people). I will absolutely accept the will"

Except you don't, because this is actually the THIRD time it's been rejected, and you didn't accept it the last times, either. So, get ready for him and Yoshimura to switch roles again or something, call their party "The Osaka ShinShinShinTou" and say they are going to try again.

All this because they suffer an inferiority complex towards Tokyo.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Waste of time and money

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The only consolation is that now we won't get grouped together with some of the crappier wards.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@ILoveCoffee

Agree 100%. Matsui shredded the No campaign's arguments patiently, although you could see the frustration mounting.

It was telling that, according to the pollsters, the biggest reason No voters cited for their No vote was “I don't want to see Osaka City disappear”. And this was the No campaign’s focus—not facts and tight arguments but the sentimental appeal: “Save Osaka!” Does anyone regret the Tokyo Tokoso?? Do we hear violins for the historic Tokyo-shi?

At least the Communist Party lady was being consistent with her party generally opposing anything from an ostensibly centre-right party; it was the LDP’s opposition that angered me more with their cynical approach. It was LDP rule that messed up Osaka in the first place, and the Osaka part of Isshin—regardless of the national party’s general vision, much of I disagree with—worked hard to turn the situation around. Matsui and Hashimoto before him were gutsy and dedicated to Osaka, a refreshing change from LDP hacks.

Anyway, I had expecting a resounding Yes victory (Oxit?) given Isshin's recent electoral success, but for the past few days I did suspect that a few too many voters would get cold feet on the day. Then there was the exit poll. Still, I was hopeful until around 11pm when the result was concluded. At the presser, Matsui was graceful in defeat. Didn't stay up for the silly LDP lady.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

"...I will absolutely accept the will" of Osaka residents, Matsui said in a press conference late Sunday following the results in the binding referendum.

magnaminous of him, seeing as the result is binding. in any case, I expect that before long he'll tweak the proposal so as to make it 'new', then announce a third referendum.... (⌒▽⌒)

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Boo.

Interesting that the grottier wards mostly voted NO, whilst the only wards I would be comfortable living in, including the one in which I live, voted YES.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Actually Yoshimura did not play a very big role in the campaign, it was Matsui that I saw on TV everyday. Given Yoshimura's all star image fighting Covid, it showed he was not really committed to Yes. After the result he immediately stated he would not support another referendum.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Instead of putting the blame on No camp, the blame should go to the Yes camp Matsui and Yoshimura for failing to market their product well, where there assumptions of Yoshimura's near star status attained through daily Corona virus briefings and handling made the Yes camp overly confident ?

I won't label the result as sad like Ilovecoffee did, the best product is never the best selling.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Why was Komeito in Osaka for?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Just like what happend with the anti-NHK party.

Yeah , the guy running that outlet is an &#@ and I say that as someone with no love whatsoever for NHK.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

For those who don't know, Ishin is a rightist/conservative party.But I guess some usually rational people blindly cheer for Ishin because "It's not LDP".

Think most people are aware of Isshin being rightist...when it comes to admin reform and cutting the bureaucratic waste of taxpayers money however , personally I don't care whether it's a left or right pushing it . It's about being pro-reform or anti- reform instead of blindly saying I will not support anything party A is suggesting because they are left or right. Nothing wrong with supporting a party one would not support normally if one agrees with their policy being put to a referendum.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

A truly devastating outcome. I followed the campaign for the entire month, and i was completely blown away by the sheer volume of propaganda emanating from the No camp. Their entire campaign was based on lies, dishonesty, misinformation, demagoguery and disingenuous rhetoric. What was the most shocking to me is that the majority of the No campaign were actually people who didn't even live in Osaka. People all the way from Sendai and Fukuoka were coming to Osaka to campaign against the new plan proposal. Virtually every right-wing news network was against it. Seemingly the entire country was against it, and was heavily involved in spreading misinformation and propaganda to convince the people of Osaka to vote No.

I watched most of the debates, and was amazed how elegantly and well Matsui in particular was able to explain and answer every single question. The No campaign people kept repeating the exact same rhetoric over and over again, and the Yes people kept debunking them with ease.

I was also struck at the incompetence and ignorance of the No campaign, which was headed by none other than the Communist party and the LDP. They literally did not seem to know anything about law and governance, let alone basic market principles like competition. For example, the LDP stooge kept saying that Ishin wants to silence the city government so they don't obstruct the Prefectural government. Matsui (the president of Ishin) kept explaining to her that the two governing bodies have different jurisdiction and authority, and she kept not understanding what that means. He kept explaining to them literally like a child that the two governing bodies are competing with each other for central government money, and that results in them wasting the money, and that the system of organization has to change to remove these incentives, and she kept not understanding, and kept repeating the exact same rhetoric.

Some people have even suggested that there was a fraud on behalf of the No campaign, because literally almost every single poll prior to the voting day showed that the Yes vote was leading with up to 10 points. I was sure it was going to be basket case, and then seemingly out of nowhere the No vote outnumbered the Yes. Very suspicious to say the least, even considering the low turnout, which wasn't even that low, because a lot of people voted early.

Anyway, really, really sad news. The status quo won again. The vile bureaucratic tapeworms came out of their mud hole to make sure these pesky reformists don't take away their mud.

Honestly, at this point, it's easy to lose hope for this country. Last year during a press conference, Matsui said that, if they can't even reform Osaka, there is no way to reform the whole country. If you can't even kill the bureaucratic cesspool of one city, you stand no chance against the bureaucratic apparatus of the entire country.

Still, hope never dies.

I can't help myself but think about the Murakami's book "The exodus from the dream country", in which he says この国には何でもある。だが、希望だけがない。

10 ( +15 / -5 )

The people of Osaka were not fools. The vote was not about reorganizing Osaka into a metropolis but abolishing the city of Osaka and breaking it into powerless districts.

5 ( +10 / -5 )

Great news.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

It might be better to separate Ishin-no-kai (the party) from the Osaka metropolitan plan (dissolution of Osaka City), even though the same people are behind the plan. Overall, dissolution of the city is a reasonable plan. But I agree with Yubaru that people in the City feared being merged with wards to the south, which include Nishinari and other poor neighborhoods.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I wonder how many referendums they will have before they get what they want. The first two didn’t workout in their favor. Perhaps it’ll take 8 or 10 before they get the result they want.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Didn't Matsui promise to resign? I guess he walked that back oh well

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Good news. Living in a city that's amalgamated I can tell you that your services aren't any better. Politicians lose sight of local issues. This keeps voting accountability, the very accountability that made them lose.  

Maybe the rightists will give up, maybe not but at least safe for another five years?

0 ( +6 / -6 )

People of Osaka got tired of political plays of Ishin-no-Kai.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

The people opposed to the plan evidently feared the loss of "identity" as Osaka City, and that the politicians could not be trusted to ensure the social-welfare benefits that they have been receiving from the city would continue.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Yoshimura is apparently popular and they couldn't win.If I were Matsui, I'd say "Fluck y'all" and quit now instead of waiting to term's end.Disappoínted in the Osaka electorate.Seems happy being looked at as a step-child to the nation's capital.

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

For those who don't know, Ishin is a rightist/conservative party.

85% of Rikken (national liberal party) supporters voted No, while LDP supporters remained ambivalent.

Reiwa Shinsengumi (Taro Yamamoto's party) and the communist party are strongly against the plan.

10s/20s voted No more than 30s/40s so it's not as simple as "Young vs Old" either.

source: https://www.asahi.com/articles/ASNC143HDNC1PTIL008.html

But I guess some usually rational people blindly cheer for Ishin because "It's not LDP". Just like what happend with the anti-NHK party.

3 ( +9 / -6 )

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