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Kishida says ruling bloc's election win shows 'will of the people'

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Well a quarter of the eligible voting public.

14 ( +16 / -2 )

And with the voter disparity probably not a quarter. For many it’s their last vote so they don’t care anyway.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

With a turnout barely over 50%? I don't get it

10 ( +11 / -1 )

Yes, but it’s more about self-applauding and not elementary school math. lol

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Kishida said he will consider resuming the government's Go To Travel initiative to boost domestic tourism and vowed to push forward debate on constitutional reform.

Kisida must be a mind reader. People are dying to give their tax dollars to hotel owners and change Article 9.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

The will of about a quarter of the voting population: Starting his 'Mandate' with the same old LDP shtick. No need to bother with reality for the foreseeable future.

"Economic stimulus package calling for Toyota and Co"

4 ( +5 / -1 )

By with so few people voting, it shows how little they support the policies of the LDP leadership and little belief in the election process. Just like those infection numbers, TEPCO, NISSAN, DENTSU scandals, and the Olympics.

Not much to be proud of at all as far as elections go.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Have to say, I do favour Australia's compulsory voting system. I know a lot of people in the U.K and U.S and other Western countries think its "undemocratic" and fair call. It is in a way. Cant argue with that. The penalty for not voting btw is often not enforced, if you have some half decent excuse and when it is, its a pultry fine.

At least nobody ever says our elections are illegitimate. Ever. The odd individual seat might be subject to some dodgy tactics, but overall, if you get the majority outright, or via coalition, you have the right to government. End of story.

10 ( +13 / -3 )

shows 'will of the people'

Will of the people ?

https://english.kyodonews.net/news/2021/11/e6477c1f68a3-urgent-japans-ldp-secretary-general-amari-to-quit-after-loss-in-his-district.html

That one is the will of people.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

31% voter turnout is not support for a mandate .

7 ( +8 / -1 )

@John

Wealth redistribution isn’t capitalism, it’s socialism....what do we have to do to get this extra money I wonder....

Tell the wealthy that and they will laugh all the way to the bank. Capitalism, especially in its neoliberal form today, is an extreme form of wealth redistribution.

Kishida idea of a new capitalism is really neoliberal Keynesianism, which is where government not only changes laws and policies to promote the privatization of the public sphere, but uses corporate welfare to juice the profits of the investing class even more.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Go go go, Fumio Kishida!

-11 ( +0 / -11 )

Kishida says ruling bloc's election win shows 'will of the people'

total BS, it shows the will of the companies to keep the cronyism going, sad that folks can't vote for themselves and are highly encouraged to vote for their employer's candidate. How much further down the hole are they going to allow them to take it?

8 ( +8 / -0 )

The 18 to 30 went shopping, dribbling over there smart phones, comatose over some boy/girl idol band.

They failed to register any choice.

So here we go again, the continuing political never ending story, an on golden pond of "gramps" leveraging the peoples finance.

Indebting future generations, to stupid to realize, in the foolish belief, that it is route to a way to establish a long credit line without recourse to servicing that debt.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Mr. Fumio Kishida, you are not the person I wanted to see as Prime Minister, but I cheer for your success. I want to see you do a good job and be successful for Japan.

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

Kishida says ruling bloc's election win shows 'will of the people'

Wow, it's Brexit Part II. "will of the people". No, 'will' of the a fraction of the 31% that actually bothered to get off their backsides to go and vote.

It should be a legal obligation to vote here, like it is in Australia.

I feel such pent up rage at those that couldn't be bovvered to vote, because, you know, some airhead was slurping noodles, or because it was raining, or because "they're all the same", or some character was making an appearance at the local AEON mall.

The people that didn't vote deserve everything coming to them - it's the rest of us that have to suffer.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

There will be more people waiting for the stimulus money than there were voters. Thats the will of the people.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

So in the end the reformist Japan Innovation Party won seats from both the LDP and the CDPJ / JCP.

And the did it without colluding with other parties to try to improve their chances of winning seats - they did it the old fashioned way of talking about their policies and making more sense than their opponents.

That’s actually a very good sign for Japanese democracy, I think.

I gather the other old DPJ splinter known as kokumin something or other also won some more seats - without the shenanigans of the CDPJ / JCP.

These dopey lefty parties constantly worry about having to combine together at election time, but as Isshin and the Kokumin party showed, it’s better to campaign on your own policies.

promised to spur economic growth while redistributing the spoils to the middle class under his vision of "new capitalism." 

This just sounds horrible.

Japan can’t afford to do more of this “middle class” welfare.

Japan’s lower class, needy folks should be the focus of redistribution.

Japan is already too far in debt to think about paying for more freebies for middle classes too.

what do we have to do to get this extra money I wonder....

You have to pay more tax and then they will give a slice of it back to you. That’s how all such government programs work. Feed the government and be happy that you got some scraps back…. GoTo Travel is a good example, but when you think about it the budget buster that is Japan’s welfare systems is similar, and desperately needs reform.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

"It was a tough election, but the outcome shows the will of the people to task my government with shaping the future of this country,"

As predicted, and now he will start talking about how "first we must secure the nation" and give record defense spending to vested government interests at the behest of his puppet masters, and will say to everything he does, "I was mandated by the people of Japan to do this!"

4 ( +5 / -1 )

"It's very unfortunate that we lost seats and I feel apologetic for that," CDPJ leader Yukio Edano told reporters on Monday.

Edano has to submit his resignation as leader of the PDCJ. Because it lost against the worst LDP government of the last decade. Losing 14 seats, which is almost in the same proportion as the 16 seats lost by the LDP.

I don't think it will. But out of dignity to his voters, he should. And put new people in the leadership of the party. Young people with clear and realistic ideas. 

As Ishin no Kai has done.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I find it interesting the leader of JIP is what, 44 years old? Has 1.8 million twitter followers.

And so there does seem to be a desire among some people at least to start the generational change in political figures. From what I've read, he was very active at a time when most werent during Covid and has been rewarded for it.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

It shows the will of the people who bothered to turn up and vote.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Have to say, I do favour Australia's compulsory voting system.

In my opinion the ability to deny the system legitimacy by refusing to participate is an important safeguard. Low turnout sends a message and has consequences on policy, even if it's hard to measure.

Australia should have a 'none of the above' option if they force you to vote.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Whether the LDP will follow the will of the people is another whole different story, so please spare me the sweet nothings...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

the leader of JIP is what, 44 years old?

Yeah, Yoshimura and Matsui, mayor and governor of Osaka are both prominent as JIP leaders, but I gather there will be a decision made on leader of the national political party, as those guys are still gainfully employed in Osaka.

One of the national JIP guys (Toranosuke) is, afraid to say it, over the hill, but with 30 extra seats there is plenty of young blood coming into the Diet.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

fxgaiToday  09:31 pm JST

And the did it without colluding with other parties to try to improve their chances of winning seats - they did it the old fashioned way of talking about their policies and making more sense than their opponents.

That’s actually a very good sign for Japanese democracy, I think.

Oh really. With the LDP winning a majority and not needing any more coalition partners, what do you think the chances are of any of Ishin's policies getting enacted?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

fxgaiToday  09:31 pm JST

And the did it without colluding with other parties to try to improve their chances of winning seats - they did it the old fashioned way of talking about their policies and making more sense than their opponents.

That’s actually a very good sign for Japanese democracy, I think.

Oh really. With the LDP winning a majority and not needing any more coalition partners, what do you think the chances are of any of Ishin's policies getting enacted?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

A stimulus package by mid November? Will the opposition block it for months and months calling for it to be whittled down?

Where are our fiscally minded penny pinching conservatives? The country in which you reside is surely as important, no?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Most of my Japanese friends see the choices as bad to worse to horrible. I suggested voting: none of the above (which used to be on the Nevada primary ballot).

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

In my opinion the ability to deny the system legitimacy by refusing to participate is an important safeguard. Low turnout sends a message and has consequences on policy, even if it's hard to measure.

Australia should have a 'none of the above' option if they force you to vote.

Being made to turn up to an election does not mean you must actually vote. Many vote invalid to object and those numbers are kept and taken notice of. Voting is "compulsory" only in that you must turn up to get your name ticked off the role.

It has worked well for decades and ensures not only a high turnout but a high number of valid votes. Much higher than most nations enjoy.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

PM Kishida should take a look at the surging suicides in Japan-the will of the people?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

The election result shows the ‘will of the people’ in one respect; the majority of the electorate either voted against the LDP, or couldn’t be bothered to vote at all.

The clear will of the people is ‘Meh’.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

In Japan, many elderly people over the age of 70 support the LDP. And it is noteworthy that from the age of 60 on down, the younger the person, the more supportive of the LDP they are.

The younger the age, the better they are at gathering information, and the more they can see through the biased reporting of the mass media. The illogical and inflammatory appeals of the CDP and the JCP will become increasingly unacceptable in the future. And if the Japanese opposition parties do not try to propose realistic policies and engage in constructive discussions, they will continue to lose supporters. Currently, the only opposition party with any hope is the Japan Innovation Party.

Source

https://twitter.com/hst_tvasahi/status/1455175492576120832

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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