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Do robots and AI lead to more job creation than they destroy?

22 Comments
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There are always other jobs created when robots are used. Maintaining the robots, building new ones. and other jobs are created in a good economy.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Yes, there will always be new jobs if you have an advanced degree in engineering or AI.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Yes, there will always be new jobs if you have an advanced degree in engineering or AI.

And/or if secondary schools gave students more vocational/technical training options and had more 'clubs' where students could develop appropriate skills.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Probably, but maybe it will force the people who think flipping burgers is a career choice into actually learning a skill.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

Probably, but maybe it will force the people who think flipping burgers is a career choice into actually learning a skill.

The class hatred is strong in this one.

Like anyone ever wanted to be a burger flipper as a career. But I suppose if you’ve never faced any adversity in you’re upbringing you wouldn’t understand how one could end up in such a position.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

The class hatred is strong in this one.

Like anyone ever wanted to be a burger flipper as a career. But I suppose if you’ve never faced any adversity in you’re upbringing you wouldn’t understand how one could end up in such a position.

Oh boo hoo. Realizing that working at a fast food joint was never intended to be a career choice and anyone thinking that has made some seriously bad life choices is far from 'class hatred'. It's called being realistic.

I joined the military after high school, learned a skill that got me in the job market. After being laid off when that market fell apart (what's that? Adversity? No!), started a new career at the bottom and worked my way up over the last 15 years to again be successful. Its called hard work.

Too many Americans think that they are owed something for working at a no-skill minimum wage job that was meant for high-school kids.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

Oh boo hoo. Realizing that working at a fast food joint was never intended to be a career choice and anyone thinking that has made some seriously bad life choices is far from 'class hatred'. It's called being realistic.

I agree. These people should be ashamed to have been born into a life with little opportunity, and no money. Morally decrepit.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

I joined the military after high school, learned a skill that got me in the job market

Sorry, I could never council someone to join the military. It was your choice, fine. But ethically it's questionable. War is one of the worst inventions of humanity. For many people, joining the military, due to its ethics, is not an option.

I'd rather be poor, uneducated, and have no opportunity, than join the military.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

Of course robots destroy many jobs, especially in manufacturing. Car manufacturing is a very good example. Car manufacturing plants' staff has been reduced by 80% due to automation of the plants, but the cost of cars just keeps increasing despite the automation. Many household appliances are also made in automated factories. One robot can do the work of half a dozen (or more) people and can work autonomously and continuously. With these kinds of statistics there is no way robots create more jobs.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Yes and no. Yes for those who are willing to learn about mechanic, robot training, etc. No if you prefer menial work. But it's a mistake to just leave people out of this advancement, which is why I'm a supporter of basic income. When robots do a lot of things, that leave us to do the creative things, actually living instead of working to survive

0 ( +2 / -2 )

kibousha - Yes for those who are willing to learn about mechanic, robot training, etc.

What if you are a 50 year old manufacturer who has worked his/her whole life in that one job and the company comes along and says, "You are being replaced by a robot"? Are you expecting that person to go back to university to become a mechanical engineer majoring in robotics so he/she can keep their job? It's quite obvious the pro-robot posts in this thread are from younger and somewhat naive people with very limited life experiences.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Just wait until AI becomes smart enough to replicate themselves, mine for resources to build more and more and cut out the middle man - humans. Industrial revolution replaced humans by 1:100 and that was 200 years ago.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Automation and, contemporarily, computerization have reduced the number of people needed in both blue and white color jobs. The major problem for most advanced industrialized nations is that their populations are greater than the number of meaningful and adequately paid jobs available. Gradual deployment of more AI will only exacerbate this.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

If a computer can solve a problem, then it isn't really all that interesting for a human.

Many humans enjoy less-brainy work.

Does society owe people with out of date skills anything? Humans have the ability to plan ahead and take steps to ensure their own future.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Does society owe people with out of date skills anything? Humans have the ability to plan ahead and take steps to ensure their own future.

Well, the American attitude is 'no'. For us from Socialist Democracies, the attitude is that society provides a social safety net to its people, so that we don't have to live with homeless people who can't afford to participate in society. Rather than thinking about how society can force individualism, we look at how society can bring us all together, so we can be healthy, happy, safe, and employed all together, rather than struggle to survive as individuals.

Of course, the staunch capitalists will argue this is the destruction of motivation, that it creates entitlement, and makes everyone lazy and dependent upon the state. And it's true that these are issues that do arise - in some of the population. But most people are motivated by wanting to work hard, and living in capitalist societies, the motivation exists to do so in order to make more money, and achieve more success. Sure, some people will be lazy and go on welfare and do nothing. So what? We do what we can to encourage them to do more, while the rest of us get on with doing more.

This is why people are happy in countries like Canada, Sweden, Norway (cue rhetoric on immigrants and crime blah blah blah), because they know they can work hard for success, and that if something goes wrong, they have a social safety net meaning they won't be homeless, without healthcare, and most importantly, be excluded from participation in society due to class discrimination. In America, the right considers it to be a moral failing to be poor. In socialist democracies, we consider poverty to be a state that people should be assisted out of.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Of course, the staunch capitalists will argue this is the destruction of motivation, that it creates entitlement, and makes everyone lazy and dependent upon the state.

A capitalist would say that the govt isn't responsible, but families ARE. The religious organization of the person IS. When "the govt" does things, there is an entitlement belief. When your family helps you out, you have a 1-to-1 commitment to help each other and become productive again.

The flaw has been seen with enless govt support, entitlement, if you will, all around the world. A few cultures, mainly in northern Europe have such a strong work ethic that it doesn't become a huge issue there. Japan might have the same work ethic. That isn't a normal situation in many other cultures.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

A few cultures, mainly in northern Europe have such a strong work ethic that it doesn't become a huge issue there. Japan might have the same work ethic. That isn't a normal situation in many other cultures.

Could you name these countries and cultures that don’t have a strong work ethic?

I would be impressed if you can do so without coming across as prejudiced.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

A capitalist would say that the govt isn't responsible, but families ARE. The religious organization of the person IS. When "the govt" does things, there is an entitlement belief. When your family helps you out, you have a 1-to-1 commitment to help each other and become productive again.

Yes, this is the staunch capitalist mindset I mentioned.

It's not shared by those of us from countries like Canada, Finland, Sweden and Norway.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Could you name these countries and cultures that don’t have a strong work ethic?

The only ones I can think of are those where hard work isn't going to advance their position in life.

Anywhere that has a motivational system, the work ethic is solid - even with a social safety net. The fact is, most humans have drive, and want to work, as long as their work provides benefit. This is a human trait, not a cultural trait.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Anywhere that has a motivational system, the work ethic is solid - even with a social safety net. The fact is, most humans have drive, and want to work, as long as their work provides benefit. This is a human trait, not a cultural trait.

And that is pretty much every country in the world, not just those with a Protestant work culture (as was implied above.

Although a strong work ethic as being a strong positive is something that many are indoctrinated with from childhood, often infused with religious teachings.

Is it really though? Taking it easy sounds good to me!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

So, if someone decides to stop working early in life because they can, is that showing they don't have a strong work ethic or that they simply chose to do something different, not related to earning a living?

There are groups of people who do this in many parts of the world. I've met them in Thailand, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, around the USA, in south America, Africa, and all over SE Asia. Usually, the locations are where food is plentiful and the cost of living is very low.

It is the places where the climate will kill you if you aren't prepared where people seem to have the greatest work ethics, in my experience. They had to prepare for winter, so they weren't a burden on their family, friends, neighbors. There are many different ways to help your community beyond having a job and spending 80% of what you earn.

Why work just to earn more money, if it isn't necessary? They even have a name for it, "FIRE." It is about enjoying what you have, not always chasing more cheese.

Clearly, I'm asking for a friend.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

If they become highly sophisticated to deal with any troubles or unpredicted incidents, the number of our jobs might decrease, but I don't think these AI and robots will be like that for a long while, so I'm not too afraid of some jobs being taken place now and in a few dacades.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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