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In view of the continuing nuclear crisis and ongoing aftershocks since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, are you planning to leave Tokyo or stay?

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When everyone is leaving, I am getting into Japan on 3/22 for the mission.

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Welcome to Tokyo. But you also mentioned that the US govt. requesting caution. How come they let you travel?

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Jkanda - Not everyone is from the US

Anybody with half a brain will know that once things settle down there will a lot of new opportunities in Japan.

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It was for globalwatcher. He posted in another thread the message from the US Embassy. And to see he has sent his emergency pkg weighing 110kg to Tokyo and he says he is landing in Tokyo.

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where's the option "I'm staying as there is no real threat or its safe"(...just the threat of panic)

its completely different to I'm staying no matter what.

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I don't live in Tokyo, so the question doesn't apply to me in a way....I'm a lot closer. No plans to move at the moment, but depending on how things develop we may move to Tokyo for a while.

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Along with 888naff, I've stayed , but that "no matter what" seems a bit too adamant for good sense.

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yep I also echo cleo's point in some way, in that I wish world reporters would stop reporting from tokyo and do their job and report on those in REAL difficulties.

There are serious concerns about the relief effort, people dying who survived the quake. But none of this is reported in the foreign media, its almost invisible.

All the reporters have left the area. I think in a way that is disgusting. DO your job and go to the disaster area ( not the plant - that is a distraction)or you might as well just be reporting from your offices in London, New York or Paris you are miles away from where its happening.

After watching many sources, the only way you can find out about the actual disaster that has actually happened and the danger still faced is by watching NHK domestic. World new is pretty useless.

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I also think there should be a multiple choice test for those that return to the country... to test what they actually have learnt following all this hype on the reactor. I bet what they would have learnt about what has is happening is minimal. I bet they are just carried by the wave of hype. It could be an interesting study into disaster management or certain individuals suitability in managing situations different to their daily life.

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Short of that plant exploding I'm not leaving.

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The focus should be on humanitarian disaster from the HUGE wave and not only focusing/asking questions about this side show; especially when it is put in perspective and explained its safe for citizens, especially those that live miles away(tokyo). For most, you are more at danger taking a flight to Rome where radiation levels are higher in that city than Tokyo (and also the radiation on the flight).

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I'm staying unless beer becomes impossible to get.

Junnama - I've been assured that even if the plant explodes/has a complete meltdown, radiation levels in Tokyo will not be harmful to human health. But if that's wrong, if you wait til then, it'll be too late.

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Well then I guess I'm not leaving at all ;)

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we have been lucky that winds have been mainly blowing out to sea, but if winds change and radiation goes up im definitely getting in my car and driving a few hundred miles south.

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PepinGalarga:

Miles? This is Japan, they don't have miles here, it's kilometers and a few (200) = 321.8688 kilometers. That's a much longer drive!

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haha, i'll drive to Okinawa if I have to. :)

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Good luck driving to Okinawa, practice holding your breath from now on.

We are staying put too. Been through Chernobyl and came through ok.

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haha, i'll drive to Okinawa if I have to. :)

Sounds good, all are welcome.

Zenny11 Good luck driving to Okinawa, practice holding your breath from now on.

No problem, just go fast. See hydroplaning in the dictionary.

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Great question, one I was wondering as well, and nicely presented by JapanToday in a way that lets everyone participate, but gives relatively accurate results.

OK, so as of now with 590 respondents living in or having lived in Tokyo, 182 or 30% say they have either already left or are leaving as soon as possible. Terrie Lloyd reported last night that 30% of his staff, both Japanese and foreign had left Tokyo as well.

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Good riddance to those who leave. More opportunities for the rest of us!!

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As hard as I try, I'm not able to work up a sense of panic. You could move to Kansas next week and be safe until the next Tornado. Or move to Thailand and get bitten by a cobra. Life is unpredictable.

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Returned already, and regret doing it since there is not major threat. Though returning now seems silly, since I would be one more person consuming food, water and energy. Once things start showign back up on the shelves and food is reliably available in the north, I will return. Bit like a dumb fish on all the media hype. Hope those directors burn in hell for causing mass panic.

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I am considering leaving for a few weeks if the situation worsens, but the recent news of food and water contamination admittedly concerns me. If they do not get the reactor fully under control soon, I would not be surprised if that became a lasting problem.

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Can i change my vote? hahaha

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How many people who left/are leaving smokes?

Afraid of a little bit more radiation that according to scientists won't affect your health vs smoking which will kill you or at least reduce your life expectancy by 15 years. It also contains radioactive carcinogens (lead-210 and polonium-210). (^_-)

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Why is there no "staying, for now" choice? "staying no matter what happens"...even if there was a 9.0 quake in Tokyo?

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The word 'flyjin' has been coined, evidently, on Twitter to describe those who left.

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When its really time to leave, it will be too late.

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What was the point of the 5th option? Why would people not living here count?

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@tokyokawasaki

To prevent people from voting something else, even tho they don't live in Tokyo. Survey usually have an option that says "don't apply", "don't know" or "don't want to answer".

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I'm staying. But not because I think this is a picnic.

The best case scenario is that they will fix the reactors, and we will all get back to work building a better Japan, while mourning the victims and their loved ones. And I am confident that many things will change. Better buildings, roads, bridges, logistics,etc

I for one have gone from having zero knowledge of nuclear power plants and accidents, radiation etc to now having a slight understanding - but enough to know that panic is not warranted - but careful living and preparation is.

But the worst case scenario is that there is a huge explosion, combined with winds blowing Tokyo way. If that happens it's worth being nervous, and realizing that a lot of people will be wanting out of Tokyo - planes, trains, buses, cars. And the shops will clear again. None of that will be fun. But, from all I understand, if we take precautions, we will be okay. I also still I think it's worth preparing for a large earthquake in Tokyo or elsewhere at the same time. A big aftershock on the same day as an explosion would be cruel, hope it does't happen, but I think the lessons of this month should have taught us that it's good to hope for the best but prepare for the worst.

So, I am not panicking now, and have learned a lot. But if you stay in Japan, you have to learn that this is a country where there are sometimes, huge earthquakes and 80 feet tsunami, the nuclear reactors are not invincible, and in a disaster, there won't necessarily be a guy from the shiyakusho coming to give you food, water and a warm bath immediately.

One interesting thing has been to see many posters who disagree vehemently on religion, politics, gender issues - you name it, having similar conclusions re the current situation.

Oh, I'm staying - but it's different when you're married to a Japanese who would rather die under the sakura drinking green tea and eating mochi, octopus and eel, than live on a sunny beach overseas. I also can't show her I'm nervous when she's so in love with the brave samurai 50!

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We are staying put too. Been through Chernobyl and came through ok.

So far as you know ...

Radiation effects can show up 20+ years later.

On the other hand, this is NOT Chernobyl. The amount of radiation is vastly less and the spectrum of radioactive products is narrower. Things could get worse - and time is important here also as radiation damage is cumulative, meaning long exposure to minimal radiation is equivalent to shorter exposure to more - but if there was going to be some spectacular fault in a reactor I think it would have happened by now.

Which leaves any reasonable person in a quandry about what to do. Don't panic, stick it out ... but risk long-term exposure - or be an UN-reasonable person, panic, lose job and friends and money and home ... but you won't have to worry about leukemia or thyroid cancer later on.

No clear answer. That's just how some things are in life.

I'd say wait patiently one more week and see what happens. By then they will have re-activated whatever cooling systems can be re-activated and see the results. The radiation over the past couple of weeks hasn't been THAT bad except near the power plant, so you ought to be safe waiting in Tokyo for at least one more week. THEN make the most reasonable decision you can.

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I need a 6th option: I've left and come back

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I'm not in Tokyo, rather closer to the plant in Ibaraki, I have a family and many friends here none of which have the options that I do. I'm here and here is where I'll stay until the government evacuates us. I take my chances with the rest of Japanese people. Some will say your risking your kids lives, perhaps so. I would consider them at risk should I move them back to London in the UK from poor education, social problems and drug abuse.

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