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Which decade do you think was the most creative musically?

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All you have to do is look at all the great groups and solo musicians, many of whom are still active, and there's no doubt the sixties reign supreme. They played instruments and actually sang without having their voices altered. Today's music has been recycled from sixties and seventies music.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

This is such a good poll. Im having a hard time choosing. It definitely ISN'T in the last 20 years though. That's for sure.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Mocheake the question asks which decade was the most creative. Not the best. I mean, if I had to choose the best I would also pick the 60's. But creatively I would say the 80's had the most going on. That stuff was on another level.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Creativity. As far as huge variety of different genres coming to the fore and becoming highly popular, the 70s saw music go from psychedelia and protest songs, through glam and rock opera, heavy metal, punk, to new romantic, electronic music, and many more I can't think of yet.

Not my favourite decade for music, but you can't deny the creativity.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Sixties was the decade of the song, seventies was the decade of pure musical creativity and invention, eighties was a decade largely given over to fashion...for me, it would have to be the seventies with a healthy nod of resepct in the general direction of the sixties.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Let's see now, in no particular order:

The Stones, Beatles, Temptations, Four Tops, Diana Ross, Jefferson Airplane, Janis Joplin, Hendrix, Doors, Dylan, Baez, Yardbirds, Eric Clapton, CCR, Country Joe and the FIsh, Chicago, Martin Carthy, John Renbourn, Bert Jansch, Pentangle, Donovan, Incredible String Band, Pink Floyd, Joe Cocker, Them, Van Morrison, Dizzy Gillespie, Stan Getz, Ella Fitzgerald, Sachmo, Ornette Coleman, Charles Mingus, Jimmy Smith, Miles Davis, MJQ, Coltrane, Thelonius Monk, Herbie Hancock, Chick Corea, Roland Kirk, Gary Burton, Muddy Waters, Ray Charles, Byrds, Paul Simon, Yusef Lateef, Cat Stevens, The Grateful Dead, David Grisman, Amalia Rodriguez, Cesaria Evora.

There must be a ton more.

Pirate radio in the U.K. stopped the BBC's monopoly on music and opened up a lot of new and very exciting sounds, Ska and Reggae (which was NOT played on the BBC because some of the lyrics were a bit naughty), British folk had a huge revival and this inspired new directions. The MOOG was invented at this time and everything went electric. Suddenly there was far more choice. Strangely, in the field of serious music, there was nothing particularly exciting as I remember, some Boulez, Stockhausen and a Malcolm Arnold Concerto.

Altogether, this was a great time, very exciting, with all kinds of new things happening and the music reflected it.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Well, I find it had to go past the 60's. So many of the bands from that time still provide the influence for modern music, or they influenced the influences of those bands.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Bertiewooster - shame on your omission of the first true hard rock band the Who.

Jessebaybay - except for a few groups, the 80's were a dark, lost period for music. A sad, synthesized, wussy hair rock crapfest that was bookended by punk's short heyday and Nirvana. I look back on 80s music with horror and physical sickness.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

1950's then 1960's after the 1970's is was over.

-10 ( +3 / -13 )

Zichi,

the 1950s. One name for you, Pat Boone. And for the poster who picked the 80s, are you kidding me? What a vast empty wasteland music was during that time. It was like the 50s with synths. That is all.

Of course the best decade for innovative music was the 60s which did extend into the early 70s a bit. But when Dan Fogelberg and John Denver took over the airwaves music essentially died.

Thank goodness music is interesting now. Hard times makes for better music.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Bertiewooster - shame on your omission of the first true hard rock band the Who.

Brother Hoserfella, I stand corrected!

There were just so many. There were the Kinks too, and Ray Davies is still going strong!

And let's not forget John Mayall!

It was a great time to be in London.

So much good music.

And wonderful radio personalities, Kenny Everett, John Peel.

Lovely!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Jessebaybay - except for a few groups, the 80's were a dark, lost period for music. A sad, synthesized, wussy hair rock crapfest that was bookended by punk's short heyday and Nirvana. I look back on 80s music with horror and physical sickness.

Sorry horsefella, but I just totally disagree with you :) ... if the 80's was the dark ages of music... then what the hek are we currently in :/ ... I just feel as though early 80's music was so different to the late 80's music. So many different styles and strands in that time frame.. everything from rock to original rap. Take michael jackson for example. His music undertook a huge change. - Each to their own I guess.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

There is more music being created now than at any other point in history - the 2000s (whether you like the music or not) is technically the correct answer.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I think the '60s are vastly overrated. Who needs a bunch of smelly hippies with guitars that overdosed? Go '80s!!!!

-8 ( +1 / -9 )

@nec123a - There is only the perception that more music is being made now. Through use of the internet smaller bands can now get more exposure. That doesn't mean the music is creative though. It just means more rubbish music is in circulation. Don't get me wrong, there are some great bands and musicians right now. But as a whole, most of the music coming out now is in no way creative. It just rehashes and genres being thrown together. As an example - real rap hardly even exists anymore. It's just all auto-tuned nonsense.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The 1340s.

My goodness, those goliards with their motets were hot stuff!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I can't understand how 80's got so many votes. I'm a keyboard player, but the synth created an excuse to not be creative - and in the 80's musicians became lazy with it.

I'm not saying that the 80's didn't have a lot of good music; it's just a lot of bad music was created during that time that was totally uncreative.

Choosing between 60's and 70's is difficult. A lot of what was great in the 70's started or had roots in the 60's.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The 80's..hmmm I saw numerous bands emerge in that era however Judas Priest - Scorpions were actually starting in the 70's. Rush early 70's...Yes another progressive band..Pink floyd..Steele Dan<- late 60's early 70's..not sure. Some bands like Ratt had some good stuff but the 80's were the days of the "Big Hair" bands. I have not listened to anything from the 80's in I do not know how long...with the exception of Rush that had already been around from the 70's....Carress of Steel, was it 1974???...I remember it well. I could not pick the 60's - the 70's is when things began to progress to a heavier level, I thought anyway. I myself prefer the hardcore stuff which really began to flourish in the late 80's and 90's. I'm 50 years old and I listen to current bands...Mnemic - Threat Signal - Periphery - Fear Factory...etc. Some of the people I grew up with are still stuck in the 80's...I progressed with the times. JT...this is a hard question and I have no "one" simple answer. I would have to say the most influential era was between late 60's and early 80's as that is when music began to progres into a harder sound....though it may not be the best. However this era has some great music and .....grrrrrrrrr........I cant pick.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The 80s wasn't just about synths - you had the start of hip-hop then too. Influenced millions.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

@cubic

you had the start of hip-hop

And with it the end of all decent music :(

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Tough one, this, and definitely no conclusive answer. I'd have to say the sixties, simply because it's when Rock basically emerged and from that, later, various other genres were spawned. I don't think you can knock the 90s, either -- a lot of what came out may have been crap, but again a huge number of genres were spawned -- so much so that it became impossible to call 'alternative' a genre soon thereafter because everything became an alternative to something else. Still, the sheer diversity of the 60s make it supreme, I think.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

This was a really tough one. I think the 60s produced an explosion of great artists and creativity, a lot of which was already there in the 40s and 50s but which came more to the fore in the 60s. The 70s - some great artists but too much prog rock. The 80s - some good songs but cheesy production. The 90s - the return to some great, creative music. And for me, the 90s was the most promising era since the 60s. Bands like Pavement, Nirvana, The Smashing Pumpkins, Radiohead etc. there were so many good ones. I still had hope for popular music in the 90s but not any more. The great musician/artists these days are mostly underground acts.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I voted 70's, but I think the 80's is getting a bit of an undeservedly bad rep here.

There were many great bands and good music coming out of the eighties. It's just that so much of it drowned out in the superficial glossy crap that was promoted by music television at the time. Personally I blame Rick Astley

We have some great music from Prince, Bon Jovi (?!), AC/DC, U2, White-snake, GNR , Cyndie Lauper, Queen, Aerosmith, Clash, Bruce Springsteen, Euryhthmix, Billy Idol, Lionel Richie,R.E.M., Tracy Chapman, Lou Reed, Police, Marvin Gaye, Metallica, Madonna, Spandau Ballet, Michael Jackson, Foreigner, Bryan Adams and so on....

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The fact is that the truly great artists span many decades.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The 80s wasn't just about synths - you had the start of hip-hop then too. Influenced millions.

True. But hardly creative. I won't be foolish as to say that all hip hop sounds the same, but it hasn't branched far. And rap had it's roots in the 70's...

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Can't vote.

Many of the great spanned many decades. Ex: Dusty Springfield & Pet Shop Boys. Each decade had winner and flops and/or one-time wonders.

All down to taste and preference, IMHO.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

But RIP music of this decade - whereas once the charts were full of creative talent, awful, repetitive, generic R'n'B now dominates. Gresham's Law states that bad money drives out good. In much the same, bad music has driven out the good.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

you had the start of hip-hop

And with it the end of all decent music :(

lucabrasi - you said it!

1 ( +3 / -2 )

True. But hardly creative. I won't be foolish as to say that all hip hop sounds the same, but it hasn't branched far. And rap had it's roots in the 70's...

Hip hop may have had its roots in the 70s - you can go even further back if you want to get to it's actual origin, but it became mainstream and truly exploded in the 80s. Even if you don't like it personally, you can't deny it has huge worldwide popularity and should be considered a genre of major importance.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

70's not going to list a bunch of bands because no need. Its just obvious.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The 20s. Jazz.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

cubic

Even if you don't like it personally, you can't deny it has huge worldwide popularity and should be considered a genre of major importance.

Oh, I agree totally! But the question is "Which decade do you think was the most creative musically?".

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Probably in the 70's and early 80's with Dire Straits, Thin Lizzy, Jeff Beck solo, Derek and the Dominos with Eric Clapton, Peter Frampton, Ten Years After with Alvin Lee, Traffic with Steve Winwood, Boston, Journey with Steve Perry, Dan Fogelberg, Allman Brothers, Boz Scaggs, Tom Petty, Todd Rundgren.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Groups like Coldplay, GreenDay and Linkin Park are wonderful musicians. They are combining different styles to create something more ecletic. Linkin Park being the most unique of the 3. Green Day cannot be outdone.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

The 60's took all the music from the past , blues, jazz, country, even classical and fused them altogether. Up until that time the music scene was extremely fragmented.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@BertieWooster - you're obviously not a hop hop or rap fan. That's ok. But that doesn't mean it isn't creative music. Music is an art form rap and hip hop included. I would say today's pop rap is garbage but back in raps and hip hops "hay day" there was a some seriously amazing lyricists. Get a pen out, write a rap that has depth and meaning and try not to make obvious boring rhymes. It's harder than you think.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

hip hop*

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Well, the father and mother of modern music is the blues, so when did we get the blues?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

2020hindsights

Oh, I agree totally! But the question is "Which decade do you think was the most creative musically?"

I'd say that the fact that hip-hop was was a new genre, and was a new form of expression for many in urban America (and later all over the world) justifies it as being a major 'creative' milestone in music. I answered the 80s, but I can see the case for the 50s too. The 50s was important for rock, soul, blues, but I'd say that the emergence of hip-hop, punk, ska, electro, (mainstream) metal, etc makes the 80s the most creative for me.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Amazing. Japanese newspaper and all of you talk only of western bands?

As far as Japan is concerned, the best decade for “modern music” was the 90s. No doubt about it. Arrived in 91 to see Seiko Matsuda in prissy white dresses (gag). Then along come Southern All Stars, Kome Kome Club, Dreams Come True, SharanQ and Urufuruzu. Pure Gold.

Listening to Urufuruzu right now. Bad day at work? Their music will fix that.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

@jessebayboy, No - that is not correct. Making music by it's very definition is a creative process. Which is what the question asked. You have confused "creativity" with "things that I like". A common enough mistake. Most people listen to music or maybe play a little guitar or something like that. Yet, they invest huge amounts of emotional capital into the artform. Only a handful of us study Music, work as musicians and/or teachers of the subject.

I constantly remind my music students that just as when I teach them Mathematics there is a wealth of knowledge about Music which requires study and practice outside of personal taste and listening experience (massively important aspects, but only a fraction of the Artform).

1 ( +1 / -0 )

cubic

I'd say that the fact that hip-hop was was a new genre

Yes a new genre. Only one new genre nevertheless. One creative leap; not many creative leaps.

The 60's was way more experimental and creative.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

2020hindsights

The 60's was way more experimental and creative.

Yeah, you definitely have a point with the 60s being more "experimental." Still, what was happening in the music industry during the 80s was definitely more diverse...hence creative? I dunno, that's just my interpretation. As I mentioned, it wasn't just Hip-hop in the 80s - you had ska, punk, electro, grunge, etc., all coming to the mainstream too. There are probably more that I can't think of. More than one new genre for sure.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The 60's was big a lot of experiments, lots of drugs, lots of musicians pushing guitars to the creative edge. The days without synths and pure raw sounds. From the Beatles, Jimmy Hendrix, Cream, Janis Joplin and others paved the way of what we now would considered classic and also considering the UK played a huge part in creating the British Invasion and left a huge mark on the slow 70's which in its own right was responsible for the creation of funk, disco and R&B which led to Hip Hop and Rap, then the 80's hit hard with the 2nd British Invasion producing hit after hit it would seem. Now the age of the synthesizer was truly born. Bands like Depeche Mode, Duran Duran, Madness and now you had Australia coming up and showing that they could also compete with the UK and US, so you had a lot of contributors, a lot of great music back then and it shows.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Most people listen to music or maybe play a little guitar or something like that. Yet, they invest huge amounts of emotional capital into the artform. Only a handful of us study Music, work as musicians and/or teachers of the subject.

Ugh. Just goes to show that those who can't do, teach. I doubt very much that the greatest rock songs in the last 50 years were written with artists worried about carrying the 4. Good music is produced by those with innate musical talent, the ability to play an actual musical instrument, and an ear for music that pompous "teachers" will never have.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Amazing. Japanese newspaper and all of you talk only of western bands?

For good reason. The question was about creativity.

As far as Japan is concerned, the best decade for “modern music” was the 90s.

Probably. Utada Hikari released her first album in the 90s.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I voted the 1970s. But the eras this poll lists could be better demarcated. Why start with year 0 for each ten-year span? 1975 roughly marks the beginning of the very influential period that encompasses punk and new wave.

Groups like Coldplay, GreenDay and Linkin Park are wonderful musicians. They are combining different styles to create something more ecletic. Linkin Park being the most unique of the 3. Green Day cannot be outdone.

Green Day? Try giving the Buzzcocks or Stiff Little Fingers a spin sometime...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Green Day? Try giving the Buzzcocks or Stiff Little Fingers a spin sometime...

Sounds like a line out of "High Fidelity".

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I ❤ GaGa

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

The 80s wasn't just about synths - you had the start of hip-hop then too. Influenced millions.

True, but it was underground for most of the 80s breaking out in 89 or so. It was the only creative music going for the decade of the 80s but you could only find it on college radio mostly. Not even black stations played it. In 89 Wild Thing broke through and was the number one song of the year. MC Hammer came a few years later. Then G-rap took over later in the 90s and rap music lost its edge.

Last, rap actually dates back to the 70s. Rappers Delight was recorded in 79. Commercially however rap is a 90s based music.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@2020hindsights

For good reason. The question was about creativity. Probably. Utada Hikari released her first album in the 90s.

You’re obviously a lost cause. Look me up when you finish high school.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

CrystalyleJul. 18, 2012 - 09:47AM JST Linkin Park are wonderful musicians.

Unfortunately, after 10 years Linkin Park went from an explosive, cutting-edge band to a band that have become full of themselves, and have made bad music. I rather listen to the 90's Japanese band "Spitz" with Hachimitsu album. They connected with people well.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I can't believe the 1970s gets only 18%. Fleetwood Mac's Rumours...

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Unfortunately, after 10 years Linkin Park went from an explosive, cutting-edge band to a band that have become full of themselves, and have made bad music.

What? When were Linkin Park cutting-edge exactly? When they were singing stereotypical nu-metal like the other 1000 bands that were doing the same thing in the late 90s?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Cubic - you don't understand!, linkin park expressed just how misunderstood, moody, sad, anguished, angry, sensitive, confused, angst-y, and vulnerable teen-age boys are. (or rather how easy it is to take their money with white rap crapola)

0 ( +2 / -2 )

hoserfella - Ah yeah, how could I overlook that?! Linkin Park single handedly gave those angsty, angry, teenagers a reason to live with some awesome tunes to listen to, and awesome hoodies to show their allegiance to the 'angry movement.' Here's a question that will have you scratching your head - which was more horrific; Linkin Park or Limp Bizkit?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Here's a question that will have you scratching your head - which was more horrific; Linkin Park or Limp Bizkit?

Thats like asking do you prefer projectile vomiting or the dry heaves? You're just happy when it's over.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

1970 - Benefit

1971 - Aqualung

1972 - Thick as a Brick

1973 - A Passion Play

1974 - Bungle in the Jungle

1975 - Minstrel in the Gallery

1976 - Too Old to Rock and Roll

1977 - Songs From the Wood

1978 - Heavy Horses

1979 - Stormwatch

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Serrano - sissies running around on stage playing flute is not innovative. Its embarrassing.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

How can the 1970s only get 18%?!

That's outrageous... the 70s are easily the best musical decade of all time.

The 60s were good but IMHO just a warm-up for the 70s... and anyway the 1960s are just too long ago to be cool.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The perceived quality/creativity of popular music is directly related to the memories associated with it, which is why the music we encounter in our youth tends to be "better" than the "crap" they're recording these days.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Astonished that nobody mentioned "Yes". That was a very creative group synthesizing the wide trend of the 70's.

70's with the emergence or golden age of ska, punk, new wave, metal, Hip hop, pop, rap, rock ... Was IMAO the most eclectic and creative era for musique.

Listening to the radio in those time was amazing: a full week without having twice the same song. Now you just get the same one every single hour.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"70's - Led Zeppelin. Eagles, Queen, Elton John, ABBA, The Who ' AC/DC, Cat Stevens, Fleetwood mac, Bee Gees, Bob Marley, David Bowie, Pink Floyd, Billy Joel, Jim Croce, Stevie Wonder.........

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Well, you cannot really break down music like this. It seems to be its usually easier to go from mid decades. For example, the early seventies has more in common with the late sixties than the late seventies. But still even that is flawed.

I chose the 70s, and I am especially talking about the mid to late seventies. Sure it is my favorite era, but its my favorite because that is where I see the most creativity. What is really interesting about it is that the bands could still play instruments and actually sing and write poetic lyrics, and at the same time they were making good use of new technology. Unfortunately after that far too many bands just leaned on the technology, and today most of them think its poetic to say the F word and sing about humping while actually using the word humping. Sad.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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