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I don't know if the number is high or low, but I think the demand for resignation agents will continue to increase, especially among young people.

17 Comments

Shinji Tanimoto, president of Albatross Co, which operates the resignation agency Taishoku Daiko Momuri. The agency, which handles negotiations with companies on behalf of employees when they quit, received 545 requests from new hires just two weeks into the new fiscal year that began April 1.

© Mainichi Shimbun

©2024 GPlusMedia Inc.

17 Comments
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Great company name given the nature of the business, however most Japanese people don't have any idea about the foreign albatross symbolism.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Interesting that some entrepreneur has found a way to exploit Japanese avoidance behaviour. Isn't capitalism great?

-5 ( +9 / -14 )

Its good that folks are leaving jobs if they are not happy. It should be a straightforward process though and you shouldn't help from an expert to do it.

13 ( +13 / -0 )

Some employers literally threaten employees and even go as far as black mail them if they leave so it is understandable that such a service exists. But before wasting money, it may be wise to use the free (or minimal fee) services offered by the government first which grants you the right to use legal specialists in such cases. I remember hearing these types of companies charge something around 50,000 JPY or more per case which is ridiculous considering what they are doing is "requesting to quite" on behalf of their clients which takes no special skill or qualification to do. Employers hold no legal obligation to listen to these companies and so ultimately the employee still needs to take action.

https://www.mhlw.go.jp/general/seido/chihou/kaiketu/soudan.html

7 ( +7 / -0 )

My first reaction is to consider this a negative development, part of the growth young people need is the capacity to reject a bad job when they understand it to be this way. But then again I have heard a lot of examples of abuse and manipulation on the part of companies to chain workers in bad positions so I can understand the need to have this option.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

I have found my calling at last.

Take so much pleasure in saying no these days.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I totally get it. I had an offer as a lateral and the recruiter was calling me non-stop. It was extremely stressful that he would not accept that I simply would not accept the offer, he wanted concrete reasons and to keep negotiating. Very stressful and I am mid-career.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

i don’t know if it’s still the same, but it used to be that you needed a letter from a former employer to have any shot at a new salaryman job. how that letter is worded made a difference.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Are you saying, I have to have a mouth piece to tell the company that I no longer want to work for them and I have to have permission to quit. WTF I Did not need that mouth piece when I interviewed?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I don't understand why a third party is necessary.

Is there some contractual obligation that needs to be dealt with legally in order not to be held financially responsible or something?

Or, are these employees just too chicken to give notice and resign, by themselves?

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Or, are these employees just too chicken to give notice and resign, by themselves?

It's societal, and part of what is considered a good work ethic in Japanese companies. As a group-based society, leaving the group high and dry is a cultural no-no. Companies will sometimes tell employees they are too busy for the employee to resign at that point in time. Quitting would show a bad work ethic, leave their co-workers high and dry (or at least, have the image of that), and result in a bad reference.

It would be a very simplistic way of thinking to just call them 'too chicken'.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

These people are so unable to do anything that they can't even quit by themselves?

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

These people are so unable to do anything that they can't even quit by themselves?

That's a very simplistic way of thinking.

Culture, on the other hand, is complex.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Funny how "culture" is overwhelmingly top down, meaning to say, benefitting those with most power. Such a dynamic would suit to foster a slave mentality in its advanced form. Hmmm.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Funny how "culture" is overwhelmingly top down, meaning to say, benefitting those with most power.

In this case. It would be simplistic to think that is true for all cases. Culture is very important to humanity.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Strangerland

Companies will sometimes tell employees they are too busy for the employee to resign at that point in time. 

The proper response to such nonsense is, "Sorry. But, I cannot work here any longer. And, your request that I ignore my own well-being to serve the company, is a perfect example of why I cannot."

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The proper response to such nonsense is, "Sorry. But, I cannot work here any longer. And, your request that I ignore my own well-being to serve the company, is a perfect example of why I cannot."

That's not considered the response of a person with good work ethic in Japanese culture, and will prevent one from getting a reference for future jobs, making future employment more difficult.

Your response is a simplistic solution to a complex issue. How do those work out?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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