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If doctors become reluctant out of fear of slander, accurate information cannot be disseminated to the public. I want social media operators to strictly regulate slanderous, harassing and defamatory posts.

6 Comments

Hideaki Oka, a professor at the Department of General Internal Medicine of Saitama Medical Center, in Kawagoe, Saitama Prefecture, who has received more than 5,000 slanderous posts against him on social media since the outbreak of the coronavirus in 2020 because he encouraged people to get vaccinated during the pandemic. Oka has filed both civil lawsuits demanding compensation and criminal complaints with police.

© Yomiuri Shimbun

©2024 GPlusMedia Inc.

6 Comments
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That's not how Web 2.0 works. It's closer to pub/lic chat than published news. Playing whack-a-mole with neckbeards is a waste of your time and will only serve to make lawyers richer.

If there are serious threats from crazy stalkers, yes, report them. Otherwise ignore the abuse.

The internet is a global playing field. Anything you say will annoy a percentage of people and even a tiny percentage of the entire planet is a lot. Playing the 'expert' card or having letters after your name does not give you immunity from this.

The solution is not to demand a North Korean mandate of control and censorship. Because none of us really want to live in North Korea, online or offline.

Consider the consequences of what you say online and only say it if you have a tough enough hide to deal with the response.

I have been called everything under the sun online. Water off a duck's back. I've been threatened with legal action on comments boards and by snail mail.

If you are going to wade in on an incendiary topic on social media, be prepared for the firestorm. Otherwise stick to the more heavily regulated forums. You will still reach a large audience and gain some protection from angry responders courtesy of stricter mods.

New media, new rules. As with real world fisticuffs, if you are not up for an online tussle, don't start one.

Six months on 4chan usually toughens people up, rather like a year at an inner city English comprehensive. But they are both something of a one way street.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

If there are serious threats from crazy stalkers, yes, report them. Otherwise ignore the abuse.

That is not something productive, demanding better regulation from the services (that are the ones making a profit from the traffic) is a much better option. If a member of your family was abused online to tragic consequences, would you just say "ignore it"? Obviously not.

Playing the 'expert' card or having letters after your name does not give you immunity from this.

Nobody is playing anything, part of the job of experts in public health is to inform and advice the population about what is the best course of action according to the best available scientific information. The "letters" after the name bring a responsibility with them, and nobody deserves abuse just for doing their job professionally.

The solution is not to demand a North Korean mandate of control and censorship

Which is not what the quote is demanding, just an appropriate control of slanderous, harassing and defamatory

posts, the same as if they were made on other media or in person. Making use of a false dichotomy is simply misleading and does not apply here.

I have been called everything under the sun online. Water off a duck's back. I've been threatened with legal action on comments boards and by snail mail.

And people have been called "thief" without merit as well, according to you that would justify letting these accusations stick and never punishing the people that willfully lie to damage the accused, something that obviously makes no sense. If you are not interested in rectifying abuse when is directed at your that is your choice to make, but pretending this is what everybody should do is what is irrational.

If you are going to wade in on an incendiary topic on social media, be prepared for the firestorm. Otherwise stick to the more heavily regulated forums. 

Again, professionals in public health have as part of their responsibilities to communicate with the public, baselessly claiming they should not do their jobs because people should be free to commit crimes against them is not a valid argument.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Here's an idea....and hear me out....how about if doctors here actually got better and provided a better service? The number of low-quality doctors I have encountered in Japan is staggering and, frankly, dangerous.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

@David Brent

You're right.

Never met a doctor here anywhere near the quality of a basic G.P back home,not withstanding bedside manners.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

For five years I have been very impressed with my team of doctors, about 20 who dealt with my cancer and post-cancer treatment. I could not have had better treatment in any other country.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

piskian

Today 09:02 pm JST

@David Brent

> You're right.

> Never met a doctor here anywhere near the quality of a basic G.P back home,not withstanding bedside manners

Hahahaha really?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

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