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We will be focusing on how to improve our business model, given consumers’ diversified needs and lifestyles.

9 Comments

Asahi Breweries President Kazuo Matsuyama. Alcohol makers are pulling their strong canned products from the market in light of health ministry guidelines on safe alcohol consumption and the global consumer trend away from heavy drinking, and are developing milder and alcohol-free beverages.

© Asahi Shimbun

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Diluted products but for the same price, no doubt. If health ministry guidelines were adhered to by the public they could always dilute their own though.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I am a bit confused about this situation. Cigarettes and tobacco products are for sale in Japan, and while they have warnings on them, and we know how dangerous smoking is, I've never heard about the amount of nicotine or tar that they have in them was controlled by the government. Why are they vilifying these drinks so much. People can still go to any liquor store supermarket or convenience store and buy the same ingredients and make their own, thus I am confused by this decision!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I've never heard about the amount of nicotine or tar that they have in them was controlled by the government.

The government is also not trying to control the alcohol content, not in general and not in chu-hai specifically. They are doing very much the same as with tobacco: Warning that it might be dangerous to your health.

Why are they vilifying these drinks so much.

The government is not "villifying" anything, they just publish guidelines pointing out the amount of alcohol that can become problematic. They don't target any drink specifically. This is the beverage industry itself reacting to trends.

On a personal note: I enjoy an occasional chu-hai as much as the next guy, but those 9% headaches-in-a-can really taste like rubbing alcohol and only serve a very specific purpose: to get piss drunk as quickly as possible. The makers moving away from them should be applauded.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I like my beer strong.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I like my beer strong.

That brings up unpleasant memories of that "strong" happoshu all the breweries did for a short while (I distinctly remember "Kirin Nodogoshi Strong"), where they mixed in whatever god-awful industrial alcohol to bring it up to "strong" chu-hai levels. Fortunately that was a very short-lived fad.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Sounds sensible. The only reason for anyone to buy the 8-9% (which judging by the taste and the hangover must have been moonshine and chemical flavorings) is to get as drunk as possible as cheaply as possible.

A bit more focus on taste and not only drunkedness would be a welcome change to Japanese alcohol.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

He means” welwillend be optimising our business model to suck more money out of consumers and individuals while trying to avoid costly courtcases “

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

He means” welwillend be optimising our business model to suck more money out of consumers and individuals while trying to avoid costly courtcases “

A for-profit company optimizing their business, maximizing their profit, and trying not to land in court? Unheard of! How dare they!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Typical government intervention. People will get as drunk as they always used to, but it will leave them with less to spend on healthy food or their kids' schooling.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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