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When I saw the name tag ‘Wife of Fumio Kishida,’ I thought what is going on with Japanese society’s awareness of human rights? Didn’t anyone think something was wrong while preparing for the garden party?

13 Comments

Seo Daegyo, editor-in-chief of the online media The Korea Focus, commenting on Yuko Kishida's name tag at the imperial spring garden party earlier this month. The omission of spouses' first names on name tags at the event has drawn criticism on social media

© Asahi Shimbun

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13 Comments
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And she probably had to help with the washing-up after the party as well. Japan hasn't changed much since the Jomon period when it comes to women's rights.

-11 ( +10 / -21 )

I had to read that twice! Wth is wrong with Japanese culture that this sort of baloney is still acceptable?

May as well just write breeder for Kishida...

-1 ( +7 / -8 )

The omission of spouses' first names on name tags at the event has drawn criticism on social media

I would be curious to see the tag in question. From the quote it doesn't seem its the omission of first names per se that is the problem, rather its identifying wives using their husband's names.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

To be fair, women are complicit in this system 50/50.

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

To be fair, women are complicit in this system 50/50.

Half of the people making name tags for this year's imperial spring garden party were female?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

The real barricade of advancing the status of women in Japan are women themselves.

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

Two comments.

First, the full name of the public official is fully disclosed, whether that official is male or female. Their spouse is a private citizen, even if they are married to a public official. Therefore, I would be interested if the male spouse of a female public official that attended also was referred to similarly, meaning "Husband of XX" or if their full name was used. It would only be if their full name was used that one could argue that this was sexist.

Second, and related, in many of these gatherings, the public official may be known, but their spouse may be unknown. Truthfully, if the name tag denotes who they are, it is helpful for anyone approaching them that doesn't know them. Anyone who has been to formal gatherings of government, business and society leaders know how helpful this can be.

Third, just found it interesting the individual who this comment is attributed to. It seems to be an unusual topic for them to comment on.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Isn't "First Lady of Japan" her proper title? She made a solo trip to the US last year to meet First Lady DOCTOR Jill Biden.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

And she probably had to help with the washing-up after the party as well. Japan hasn't changed much since the Jomon period when it comes to women's rights.

Lol!

Great post.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

I doubt very much if the male spouses of the female dignitaries were wearing nametags with their first names omitted and replaced with "husband of..."

Sure, it's possible. But, I highly doubt it. And, I would really like to know what theirs did say.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Our PM would probably prefer "Property of Fumio Kishida". What happened to Abe's promise to make Japanese women shine?

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

@ garypen

Actually for this year it was but not in the past where only ladies saw their name omitted.

The Imperial Household Agency is not able to say when the change happen.

So I guess we will to wait and see if someone manage to find out thanks to pictures. I wonder if they will be a case in which the spouse name do not match to see how they handled it, same as if the spouse was actually famous too.

https://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/15277710

1 ( +1 / -0 )

zones2surf: "Third, just found it interesting the individual who this comment is attributed to. It seems to be an unusual topic for them to comment on."

What's so interesting about it? If it had been made by a Japanese news source -- and it wouldn't have or the person would be canned immediately -- it would not make the news. So, rather than interesting I'd say it's just common sense it has to come from someone slightly outside the circle.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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