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Cash is the easiest to use, and people don’t find it inconvenient.

10 Comments

Eiichiro Yanagawa, a senior analyst for consulting firm Celent, on why cash is still used for most retail transactions in Japan. Credit and debit cards and e-money make up only 17% of the nation’s retail consumption. (Bloomberg)

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10 Comments
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But they don't know any different really. Especially with the over 50 crowd here. That said, e-money is a bit inconvenient here. There is no universal system in place. Your edy card is only good at some stores so you need a different service for others. It's the complete opposite in New Zealand though. For at least 20 years the eftpos system has been the standard payment option in any store across the country. The last few times I've been back it's been even easier with the paywave option where I can just swipe my card or phone in front of the terminal. Yeah, you pay fees, but it's the price you pay for speed and not having to wait for people at the checkout rummaging through a fistful of small change.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Cash is only convenient because debit cards and credit cards are so inconvenient to use. Like my debit card can only be used during certain hours. What's the point of this? And I can't even comment on if credit cards are convenient or not because it is so hard for foreigners to get one.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I've been targeted by scam attempts a few times on my credit card. I've also faced 3%-5% percent service charges in the past. I've also had travel agents and other make fill me out electronic forms,etc. for the privilege of using a card to make a payment.

So... I use cash. It makes way more sense in this day and age.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

On a recent trip home, cashiers were constantly having to cancel and re-enter transactions because I was using cash, not plastic, which was contrary to their expectations. Wasn't a problem, just something I noticed. I prefer to buy things the old fashioned way (save for it and pay cash) and avoid the legalised usury of a the credit card industry.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Credit card means I don't have to handle so many 1 and 5 yen coins, and I don't need to go to the ATM so often.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I love cash. No surprises at the end of the month for spontaneous encounters while shopping and forgetting the cards were used. Plus, two months ago, both my UC cards Visa and Mastercard got hacked and used to buy stuff all over the globe.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

It's just my opinion, but cash is the best tool for criminal transactions. Electronic transfers can be recorded and traced. That is why the Government and Japan Inc in particular will keep Japan from going cash free as long as possible.

When my old credit card got hijacked, i didn't have to pay a cent because the credit company tracks my vacation and spending habits and realized something was up...so that's how I learned to love Big Brother.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I find it inconvenient when there is a person in front of me trying to give the shop assistant the exact price on the till.

If the bill was 9,999 yen, I'd give the assistant 10,000 yen and collect the one yen change. I would NOT painfully count out 9,000 yen in 1,000 yen bills, 900 yen in 100 and 50 yen coins, 90 yen in fives and tens and 9 yen in single one yen coins.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Old gits at a counter with long line waiting while they pick out each coin and then drop it then get it slowly, etc. KMN.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

cash is great until someone steals your wallet, or you lose your wallet, or you try to rent a car or other expensive item,,,

0 ( +1 / -1 )

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