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I believe there were many things he left unfinished as a politician. But he planted many seeds and I'm sure they will sprout.

14 Comments

Akie Abe, speaking after the funeral of her husband, former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

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Tourism will most likely sprout, once covid eases.

Japan made somewhat of a shift toward neo-liberal, shareholder-based capitalism during the Abe years. However, Abe's successor certainly wasn't impressed, and is now vowing to replace it with a new version of capitalism that involves redistributing wealth away from the corporations and the rich and to regular working folks. Gotta love the "conservate" LDP! Let's see how the Kishida vision goes.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Mark my words, if Takaichi (or other likes her) "sprout," we are all in trouble.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Harvest the good ones, and prune the ones that did nothing to improve the lives of the common working class.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Concerning Abe's policies and overall legacy, I think that "weeding out" is more appropriate...

But again, his follower (Kishida) seems to head to "stability" and "continuation", so not likely to happen.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

One doesn't wish to be disrespectful about the comments of a grieving widow, nevertheless, in a democracy one is entitled to say 'better let a new gardener do the landscaping'. On the surface of it, Kishida appears to be less of an ultra-nationalist, trickle down economics kind of guy....so hopefully, he'll be able to plant a more even lawn.

But the question always remains as to what degree the PM actually holds power over the ruling party. A comment I hear from some Japanese is that the PM is actually just a puppet of the ruling party. I personally don't know what degree of autonomy any PM has, but I have heard these comments made more than a few times by Japanese people.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

No offense to Ms. Abe, but everything Abe did as PM led to disaster and was more often than not rooted in secrecy and scandal, from Abenomics to even Abenomasks. There was nothing he was more interested in than pursuing a nationalist agenda to return Japan to what he felt was the "glory days", cause inflation like we are seeing today (and suffering from), and then some. His policies work was unfinished only in that it was failure, and any seeds he planted need to be weeded out, not grown. The man quit his job twice, but was still trying to pull the strings. He did not at all deserve what happened to him, but neither should his plans for Japan be coddled and the embers fanned simply because he was killed.

-1 ( +10 / -11 )

Abe was a man ahead of his time. He will be missed.

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

Abe was a man ahead of his time ???? Did time go full circle?

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

@Chabbawanga

Yes, Abe was ahead of his time (in Japan) in the sense that he wanted Japan to have a spine. He wasn’t afraid to take a position. Most of the other Japanese politicians are weak and afraid to take a firm position, but Abe was the opposite of that.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Mark my words, if Takaichi (or other likes her) "sprout," we are all in trouble.

exactly

Concerning Abe's policies and overall legacy, I think that "weeding out" is more appropriate...

agree

No offense to Ms. Abe, but everything Abe did as PM led to disaster and was more often than not rooted in secrecy and scandal, from Abenomics to even Abenomasks. There was nothing he was more interested in than pursuing a nationalist agenda to return Japan to what he felt was the "glory days", cause inflation like we are seeing today (and suffering from), and then some. His policies work was unfinished only in that it was failure, and any seeds he planted need to be weeded out, not grown. The man quit his job twice, but was still trying to pull the strings. He did not at all deserve what happened to him, but neither should his plans for Japan be coddled and the embers fanned simply because he was killed.

Exactly! VERY well said Smith

Abe was a man ahead of his time ???? Did time go full circle?

Or just stop?

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

@smith: Inflation is a problem worldwide - being more of a prob;em here with YCC in place weakening the yen. LDP is faction based - and he was leader of the biggest, so of course he was pulling strings.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

But he planted many seeds and I'm sure they will sprout.

One of the seeds is called "Kodomo Shokudo" where volunteers help feed needy kids and provide a place to go to after school.

Something any government should be ashamed of having when it is their job to prevent this kind of need. Abe did nothing for lower/middle classes.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

All-in-all, what Japan needs is a "re-boot" across the board.

What Abe brought was at best 10 years worth of "inertia" by offering more of the same, if not, even trying to go back in time to the "glory days". Add a quasi-pathological denial as to where Japan and its capacities were standing, as well as to what needed (and still needs) to be done. Finally toss in a very personal and very completely out-of-touch right-wing agenda nobody was (and is) interested in.

What did Abe bring at worst? A delirious sense of self-entitlement, aloofness and arrogance, pretty much in-line with UK's Boris Johnson and his feeling that rules just "didn't apply" to him, to his buddies and to anything that he and them were doing. Add a complete disdain for those who are not a part of the "clan/clique/group/class/category" he and his buddies were a part of and that they had to accept all of this as "facts", as well as the "fact" that they were "irrelevant/expendable/disposable".

A recipe for disaster...

What about Kishida? No clue.

After 18 years in Japan, is my understanding is that the PM is just a "consensus" all the warring factions agree upon. More "exuberant" characters (e.g. Koizumi or possibly even Aso) nearly ran the party into the ground and are therefore not likely to appear anymore.

As such, the PM has no plan to call his own. If so, there is zero chance that whatever Kishida will roll out over the next few years to be really distinct from what Abe had on offer. Why would it? It's still the same people pulling the strings, so...While I do believe that Kishida is "smarter", less out-of-touch than Abe, whether he is more "honest" (or even "sincere") than Abe or not is ultimately irrelevant...

Also, over the decades did Japan corner itself increasingly in a tight spot, so options are limited. To Kishida (or anybody who comes after him), does the job come with too many strings, limitations and not enough options which does not bode well for any of us...

TBH, it's difficult to be optimistic about things after a certain time spent here...

2 ( +6 / -4 )

I gonna pass on this

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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