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I suffered psychological anguish from TEPCO and I'm also angry with the central government. To me, that is the truth. The facility has asked us to speak the truth so it is not in a position to say ‘Don’t say such things.’ I will quit as a guide if expressing my feelings is considered being critical.

9 Comments

A tour guide at the recently opened memorial museum to the 2011 triple meltdown at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant in Futaba, Fukushima Prefecture. Tour guides have expressed frustration at instructions not to criticize the central government or Tokyo Electric Power Co when speaking to visitors to the museum.

© Asahi Shimbun

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

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Whatever happened to freedom of expression? Or does that just apply to supporters of the gov and their right wing demonstrators? The idea that this country is a democracy with human rights is a JOKE.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Slowly the govt. began modifying people's perceptions of what actually happened on that fateful day on Mar. 11, 2011....

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Historical revisionism? File under Con-ti-nu-i-ty.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Cut the vitriol, people. Yes, the government deserves it. But as a witness to the damage, as it happened, I believe it is good to appreciate diverse opinions about the response of all involved. Let her/him speak what they perceive as the truth. Their truths are far more accurate than the government's. But let's stop dissing people, and make a difference.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

I believe in freedom of speech on your own time and dime.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

on your own time and dime.

And on the citizens' dime. That's not as if Tepco had paid all the bills incurred by their incompetence. If people want to visit, it's not to get brainwashed but to see what happened to their taxes.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The idea that this country is a democracy with human rights is a JOKE.

Yep...no better than China despite how superior and democratic Japan likes to think it is.

Slowly the govt. began modifying people's perceptions of what actually happened on that fateful day on Mar. 11, 2011....

Absolutely...same whitewash as WW2. In 20 years the mushrooms here will have forgotten the truth.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

There is not such a thing like responsibility of any company , good or bad, for earthquakes and tsunamis outcomes. If I were Tepco and under such stupid fire and accusations I would immediately close down everything. Then you can sit in the dark , go for some wood into the forests with an axe and eat your cheap meals shivering in winter time and in dark rooms or with some candlelight until all your brains have returned back to normal. They could and should have better calculated or estimated and built the wall around the power station some meters higher, that’s right and that’s all. Like other incidents or nature catastrophies the help and the costs go on the taxpayer, not a single business entity.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

 If I were Tepco and under such stupid fire and accusations I would immediately close down everything.

Close down? They don't have that choice. All their nuclear reactors are already out of service. And TEPCO is now 56% owned by the government of Japan, because the government put in a vast amount of money to prevent TEPCO's collapse. That's right, it's been nationalized.

And here's the situation: Daiichi was destroyed - 3 reactors gone within a day or two of the earthquake, the others beyond saving. Daini is to be decommissioned, ending forever TEPCO nuclear power generation in Fukushima Prefecture. Kashiwazaki-Kariwa in Niigata Prefecture is generating nothing, and has been shut down for even longer than Daiichi and Daini, due to an earthquake in 2008. There was a limited and short-lived restart, killed off by the 2011 earthquake. The plant is now known to be sitting on fault lines, and the rules aren't as "flexible" as they were pre-2011. So the future of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa is in doubt too: and if that goes, it's the end of nuclear power for TEPCO.

TEPCO continues to generate power from non-nuclear sources, but if it were to relinquish those plants there would be little problem finding takers for them.

As for the cold, dark, and return to candlelight you fantasize about, after March 2011, Japan got through an extended period with no nuclear reactors generating power, and after the first few critical months of adjustment - in particular the first summer - was able to meet electrical demand without any problem. Nuclear power in Japan is a shadow of what it was, and it never generated more than 30% to start with. It will never return to that peak. Yet we still have with all the air conditioning, heating, and LED lighting we need.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

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