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It's a conflict between the freedom of expression and choice, and the healthy upbringing of youths. I'd like to decide whether to go full steam ahead with the measure based on the opinions of resident

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Chiba Mayor Toshihito Kumagai. Beginning in summer, the city will start concealing the covers of adult magazines sold at some convenience stores, out of consideration for children and visitors from overseas who are expected to increase in number as Japan looks to hold the 2020 Olympic Games. (Mainichi Shimbun)

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I believe there were Childlren in Chiba long before Tokyo was chosen as an Olympic site. I love how politicians are forcing changes (some good, some questionable) because of the impression foreigners would have of lovely unique safety Japan.

It seems the changes can't be made because they're good ideas; only because Oh No! What will Foreigners Think‽

10 ( +10 / -0 )

It's a conflict between the freedom of expression and choice, and the healthy upbringing of youths.

When I was a healthy youth the thing I most wanted to do was look at photographs of attractive naked women. That was my choice and I appreciated the freedom I had to exercise it.

I'm sure Mr.Kumagai means well but, as Borscht comments, changes should be made because they are good, not because of what the neighbours might think.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Once again good ole gaiatsu to the rescue!!!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Stop smoking outside every combini. That is FAR more damaging than seeing a half naked woman.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

out of consideration for children and visitors from overseas who are expected to increase in number as Japan looks to hold the 2020 Olympic Games.

How about out of consideration for the women and children of Japan? Once again, Japan cares what the world thinks but doesn'T seem to care what locals think. A step in the right direction but an eyeroll for the reason.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

That's one of the things that surprised me the most when coming to Japan. How it is totally acceptable to display these types of magazines in convenience stores in full view of every type of customer. Especially in one convenience store I frequent where the magazines are right next to the register, where you can't even avoid seeing them if you wanted to. I'm not someone who's against porn. I'm actually pretty pro-porn. But I don't think convenience stores are the right setting to sell them. And given that you can go online and look at basically any porn you want (and most of it for free), I don't understand how these magazines are still popular in Japan.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

These mags aren't really popular, if you lived here before the internet took off about HALF the racks at combini's were full of the stuff at least, now just a few remnants compared to the olden days.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Hardly necessary to do anything. The internet is pretty much killing off porn magazines. Why pay money and suffer potential embarrassment in buying these at a convenience store when they can be accessed for free in the privacy of one's home?

Unfortunately, kids also have access to the internet. So, as usual, Japan finally solves problems only after they are no longer relevant.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Can anything ever get done here without gaiatsu?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

It's a conflict between the freedom of expression and choice, and the healthy upbringing of youths.

No its not. AT ALL. The conflict between the freedom of expression and choice would only be relevant IF they were banning the sale of the mags completely. Covering them up means that all these people who still want to buy the mags can do so without the rest of us having to be exposed to it or have our children be exposed to it either.

Stop smoking outside every combini. That is FAR more damaging than seeing a half naked woman.

I think these 2 issues are the same. Protecting the rights of one group of people by infringing on another's. As if there exists some warped right to see naked women the minute you walk into a conbini is about as ludricous as the right to pollute the air for EVERYONE to inhale. The right to do something is fine as long as it doesn't infringe on the rights of someone else to be able to avoid it.

Once again good ole gaiatsu to the rescue!!!

Maybe not, my friend. They could remove the covers right after the Olympics. Same with the non smoking ban.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@Aly Rustom FEB. 16, 2017 - 12:00PM JST

No its not. AT ALL. The conflict between the freedom of expression and choice would only be relevant IF they were banning the sale of the mags completely. Covering them up means that all these people who still want to buy the mags can do so without the rest of us having to be exposed to it or have our children be exposed to it either.

I'll disagree. As soon as you put any restriction, you are already interbalancing freedom of expression with something else. You do realize that book covers are meant to attract customers and give them a clue as to what's on in the book, so the moment you insist they are covered, you are already disadvantaging them.

If you don't agree, just think suppose China allows the sale of books previously banned for political reasons, but they have to be covered up. While that would still be a big improvement over the current situation there, you wouldn't say freedom of expression is being fully respected, won't you?

Personally, I think in the absence of solid causation establishment, there is no reason to not prioritize freedom. However, if you choose in another direction, at least you shouldn't blind yourself to what you are really doing.

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

Adult magazines do not belong in convenience stores unless the store has a separate room or space with warnings for such publications.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I'll disagree. As soon as you put any restriction, you are already interbalancing freedom of expression with something else.

I could argue that Japan does that with the adult mosiac. So maybe they should get rid of that first?

You do realize that book covers are meant to attract customers and give them a clue as to what's on in the book, so the moment you insist they are covered, you are already disadvantaging them

No. They can open them, have a quick look and decide if they want to buy them. Plus, what kind of message are we sending out to society if we expect people to judge books by their covers. Its what inside that counts.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Top-self, well out of sight, shop staff should be suspicious of minors asking for a step ladder. .

2 ( +2 / -0 )

If you don't agree, just think suppose China allows the sale of books previously banned for political reasons, but they have to be covered up. While that would still be a big improvement over the current situation there, you wouldn't say freedom of expression is being fully respected, won't you?

Why use "China" here? Japan has banned books for political reasons.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@tmarieFEB. 16, 2017 - 10:06PM JST

Why use "China" here? Japan has banned books for political reasons.

That may be, but frankly none of those come to mind. Perhaps you can remind me of those books' names or their themes, and whether it was a partial (for example, removal from a school library) or total ban. Not that, as a rule, I think this kind of crap is good.

@Aly RustomFEB. 16, 2017 - 01:37PM JST

I could argue that Japan does that with the adult mosiac. So maybe they should get rid of that first?

Your argument is correct, but what makes you think I believe those mosiacs are a good idea?

No. They can open them, have a quick look and decide if they want to buy them. Plus, what kind of message are we sending out to society if we expect people to judge books by their covers. Its what inside that counts.

Here you are just showing willful blindness to how the world really works, whether we like it or not. People are initially attracted to books by their covers - that's why a lot of effort go to making them attractive. If they have to even open this black wrapped bag just to see the cover, the book is already disadvantaged.

And if you have to go through a process of begging some shop staff to even see the cover (let alone the innards), that in itself is a very significant deterrent to buying.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

I could argue that Japan does that with the adult mosiac. So maybe they should get rid of that first? Your argument is correct, but what makes you think I believe those mosiacs are a good idea?

Fair enough. We agree on that

Here you are just showing willful blindness to how the world really works, whether we like it or not. People are initially attracted to books by their covers - that's why a lot of effort go to making them attractive. If they have to even open this black wrapped bag just to see the cover, the book is already disadvantaged.

That is ridiculous. These books are available overseas in specially designed shops and people go there to buy them. Having them in an conbin is even more accessible, and people who want to buy this filth will buy it whether or not it is covered. It is you who is blind to how marketing works. The idea that this filth will no longer be bought because they are covered is silly. And why should WE who DON'T want to buy the books HAVE TO see it? Why should our children be forced to see it? Why should our daughters and sisters be taught at a young age that they are sex objects?

If you don't agree, just think suppose China allows the sale of books previously banned for political reasons, but they have to be covered up. While that would still be a big improvement over the current situation there, you wouldn't say freedom of expression is being fully respected, won't you?

Yes I would. As long as the books ARE being sold. So you are wrong there too.

And if you have to go through a process of begging some shop staff to even see the cover (let alone the innards), that in itself is a very significant deterrent to buying.

No its not. Because if you want to see this filth, you'll buy it no matter what.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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