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Our communities are extremely safe. Most Canadians are very friendly. If you are a Japanese parent and if you are thinking of your child going for a foreign education for whatever reason, what is happ

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Gerald Keddy, parliamentary secretary to the Canadian minister of international trade. Canada has emerged as a new popular destination among Japanese for language study, college and working holidays. (New York Times)

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As a Canadian, I have to agree with the sentiments of my fellow posters above. It's one thing to self-promote, but it's in bad taste when this is done at the expense of others.

There may be a problem of context here too, but in any case, there's no need to promote Canada by disparaging the US.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

You won't find a more ardent supporter of our good friends the Canadians - they are wonderfully friendly people with a beautiful county....but this gent's retort against the US is woefully inaccurate and in bad taste. And the "clear conscience" dig is absolutely deplorable.

His comments are certainly not representative of the Canadians I know.......

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The Japanese in general have an image that the US is dangerous and this is emphasized in the media ( many believe Japan has the lowest overall crime rate and are often aghast when they hear it doesn't ). The issue of widespread gun ownership ( incomprehensible to most Japanese ) and recent massacres does play on the mind and most don't bother to check crime stats. This is a low blow, but will resonate with many.

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He's just doing his job. He's a trade minister. He's just trying to drum up support for some Canadian-Japanese trade.

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Wonbatto: "Canada is a wonderful country and there is much to admire about Canadian society, but too many Canadians tend to define themselves by what they are not - not the US."

Very true, and some people see that as a sign of insecurity. It may well be, on a national level, but I don't consider it so personally. If you show up, let's say a Caucasian dude in Japan, and someone comes up and asks you "Are you from....?" what do you think the name of the nation in the ellipses will be? On a more microcosmic level, until recently I would say my 'hometown' was Toronto, simply because Geographically it's simple. When the last figure skating championship started, I could say "London" and those paying attention knew there is one in Canada. After Kim Yu-Na won again and everyone started pretending the event never occurred, it's back to 'Toronto', but the point is that all in all it's about association. Canadians and Americans, despite anyone saying different (usually a Canadian), are by and large very similar when compared to other nations. It makes total sense, despite all the actual differences, when you compare with how different British are to Americans, as an example. As such, since so many people are more familiar with American culture it's an easy point to jump off by comparing differences when the people asking likely can't see many.

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why do you drive your kids to school if they could just walk?

Because it is far or rainy or cold.

Why do you have a gun in your house, if you aren't scared?

My parents live in a town which has had one murder in over 150 years, and maybe 10 break-ins in the last century. My father owns a few guns because he likes hunting.

Why do you only feel safe in your suburbs, when you could live in the city, where you actually work?

Because living in the city is way more expensive and inconvenient and crowded than in the suburbs.

If it is so safe, why does your SUV-car look like a tank?

People like big cars, I dunno. Makes it easier to carry a lot of things and people.

Any other astonishingly ignorant questions, bro?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

He's just doing his job. He's a trade minister. He's just trying to drum up support for some Canadian-Japanese trade.

And doing so in a totally provocative, insensitive and inaccurate manner - there's no excuse for it in my view.....

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Canada is a wonderful country and there is much to admire about Canadian society, but too many Canadians tend to define themselves by what they are not - not the US. They would do well to carve out their own identity.

Aside from being in extremely poor taste, such a comment is just too simplistic - is the overall crime rate really lower at an urban university in Toronto than, say a rural university in the US?

Mr. Keddy is a Conservative MP from a riding in Nova Scotia. Halifax, which borders his riding, had a homicide rate of 4.4/100,000, putting it higher than Seattle and San Diego, and not too far behind New York City. Other parts of the US do have higher rates of violent crime, but overall we're not talking about gaps that ought to provoke a crisis of conscience among parents looking to send their children abroad for an education.

There are plenty of reasons to consider Canada for educational opportunities. But if you need to instill fear and backhandedly criticize parents who have considered alternatives as somehow negligent, then perhaps you're not so good at articulating those reasons.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Funny how you confirmed all my assumptions about Americans, but seem to have an explanation for everything.

For one, it wouldn't be far for your kids to walk if you would live in the city. Also, living in the suburbs must be so cheap, yeah right. Also, would you believe a black man carrying a gun saying he carries it because he likes hunting? Well then why would you belive a white man saying the same thing? Let me tell you why you don't live in the city, too many non-white people. Go hide now in your SUV.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Wonbatto Mar. 27, 2013 - 02:08PM JST There are plenty of reasons to consider Canada for educational opportunities. But if you need to instill fear and backhandedly criticize parents who have considered alternatives as somehow negligent, then perhaps you're not so good at articulating those reasons.

On a competitive level, many affluent Canadians that wants to succeed prefer to cross the border and go to U.S. for higher education. There are many quality colleges and universities just across the border in Washington state, Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin, New York, or Massachussettes area. Canada is little bit laid back and people tend to accept the way things are. If you compare with any cities in Canada with Seattle, Boston, Austin or Silicon Valley area, demographic wise, these area has alot higher percentage with college degree. In the U.S., higher education environment creates much better competition to succeed in technical world. However, todays much higher education cost in the U.S. is becoming a deterrant for foreigners and Canada might be a good choice.

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Our streets are extremely safe. Our communities are extremely safe. Most Canadians are very friendly,” Mr. Keddy said. “If you are a Japanese parent and if you are thinking of your child going for a foreign education for whatever reason, what is happening in the U.S., it would be very difficult, I think, in clear conscience to send your child there.”

"Our streets are extremely safe." was what preceded this original quote. Sorry, Mr. Keddy, the streets in the vast majority in the US are also safe. And this from the same article: "The number of Japanese students going to the United States has also risen recently, after having fallen sharply over the past decade and a half. "

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Come on! If the U.S. streets are so safe then why do you drive your kids to school if they could just walk? Why do you have a gun in your house, if you aren't scared? Why do you only feel safe in your suburbs, when you could live in the city, where you actually work? If it is so safe, why does your SUV-car look like a tank?

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Most Canadians are very friendly.

This. This is where Japan fails. Notice it doesn't say "Canadians are friendly" or "All Canadians are friendly".

Yep, I can see why some posters are upset - and yes, Halifax can be nasty but has gotten better. hat being said, it IS safer than the US when you compare violent crimes and deaths. Though of course, one could debate how the stats are made.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

For one, it wouldn't be far for your kids to walk if you would live in the city. It is cheaper to live outside the city and drive your kids to school or have them ride the bus than it is to live inside the city.

Also, living in the suburbs must be so cheap, yeah right. Cheaper than the city, yes.

Also, would you believe a black man carrying a gun saying he carries it because he likes hunting? Well then why would you belive a white man saying the same thing? Oh, so now I'm a racist. Ok.

Let me tell you why you don't live in the city, too many non-white people. I don't live in the city because I live in the suburbs. I substitute teach at schools that are roughly .5, 1, and 10 miles away from my home. I was born here, and I like it here.

Go hide now in your SUV. I do not own a vehicle.

You carry an awful lot of irrational hatred towards white Americans.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Kimokekahuna HawaiiMar. 28, 2013 - 04:15AM JST Canadians are great people.. hard working, hockey loving, honest and humble eh? But some cities are getting to be dangerous like Vancouver where some Chinese, Taiwanese, Vietcong immigrants escape a hellhole and then set up shop, create non assimilated communities bringing their culture, crime, third world mentality along with them and young women target naive Canadian men for marriage or breed like rats to have "native" born children so they can stay and also get welfare benefits that are inherent in that practice.

First of all, do not call Vietnamese people Vietcong. It's a same as calling Japanese people J_PS. You must be naive. This is a very derogatory word to use. I am not sure if you ever lived or been to Vancouver, Victoria, Nanimo or Kelowna, but most of these immigrants contribute substantially to the community. These immigrants have taken jobs that native people will take. Do you see any white taxi drivers in Vancouver?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

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