Voices
in
Japan

quote of the day

The increase of 10,000-yen notes in circulation is a reflection of the growing sense of anxiety.

13 Comments

Hideo Kumano, a chief economist at Dai-ichi Life Research Institute Inc. As of the end of 2020, the volume of 10,000-yen notes had jumped 5.3 percent from a year earlier. The value of the notes is 110 trillion yen.

© Asahi Shimbun

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

13 Comments
Login to comment

I think it is more of an indication of the government printing more money.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

So the volume of these notes are increasing? That's because as time goes by, the don't buy as much as they used to...it has nothing to do with anxiety.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

No, it isn't. It's a reflection of fiscal policy.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Is Kumano another one of those "experts"? Just askin'.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

So the volume of these notes are increasing? That's because as time goes by, the don't buy as much as they used to...it has nothing to do with anxiety.

Actually in Japan they do buy as much as they used to, inflation is basically non existent here. The consumer price index today is about the same as it was in the 1980s.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Is Kumano another one of those "experts"? Just askin'.

So you ask a question. Then follow it with a statement saying you asked a question.

What does that even mean?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I disagree, my ones are rapidly decreasing and I am quite sure, your ones too.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Retirees finally having to pull the money from under the mattress?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The increase of 10,000 yen notes in circulation is a reflection of the increase of 10,000 yen notes in circulation.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

People are being forced to spend money they had saved.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Actually in Japan they do buy as much as they used to, inflation is basically non existent here. The consumer price index today is about the same as it was in the 1980s.

Today there is a consumption tax of 10%. Did not exist prior to 1989, and when it was introduced it was 3%.

And as for price inlation--they can say what they want in the stats, but a 10,000 yen to me does not buy as much as it used to...that includes travel, food, hotels.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

And as for price inlation--they can say what they want in the stats, but a 10,000 yen to me does not buy as much as it used to...that includes travel, food, hotels.

I've been living here since the late 1990s.

When I go to a grocery store, the prices of just about everything are the same as they were when I arrived in Japan (granted, the consumption tax is higher though).

I own a house which I bought four years back and paid way less than I would have for something similar when I first arrived in Japan.

Hotels did go up a bit pre-Covid due to the surge in tourists in recent years, I'll give you that. But that isn't a daily expense for most people.

When I go back to my home country I'm always amazed at how expensive stuff has gotten since I left, something I never feel in Japan.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I own a house which I bought four years back and paid way less than I would have for something similar when I first arrived in Japan.

But is not the general case in Japan. A house depreciates over the years...they don't increase in value unlike most other countries.

Not sure your home country, but when I look at grocery prices in mine and I compare it to Japan, Japan is never cheaper (with one exception, liquor)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites