baseball

62 and 700: Judge, Pujols closing in on home run milestones

8 Comments
By NOAH TRISTER

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I'm not a Yankee fan by any stretch, but I'd like to see Judge break the record. Seems like a genuinely likable guy who has done it the right way, unlike cheaters Bonds, Sosa and McGuire.

All 3 should have been erased from the record books years ago.

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Judge is the real deal and is presently the most dangerous and exciting hitter in baseball. His WAR will probably be top-100 all-time at the end of the regular season.

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Judge is also in the mix for the AL Triple Crown — he's leading big in homers and RBIs and just one point behind batting leader Luis Arraez

So it's not just the HRs - quietly he could win the whole Triple Crown

(Also as a bit of a footnote: the 4 NY teams that played, all won on the same day - the Yankees and Mets in the MLB; the Giants and Jets in the NFL. The last time that happened was 13 years ago in 2009.)

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@master Ok I understand you are not by any stretch a Yankee fan and perhaps never played the game higher than little league. just as the write who wrote this article said "The exploits of Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa have become complicated by performance-enhancing drug suspicions". I don't get it and more than half of the people who bring this issue up are just writers and people who have NEVER PLAYED the game on a pro level. I agree, yes it is alleged that they took drugs. My question is this. Did the drugs enable them to SEE THE BALL BETTER? The point is you still have to hit a 89-98 mph fast ball. If you ever stood in the batters box and faced a pitcher that throws good stuff and I am sure those batters faced the best pitchers, they still managed to hit the ball. It was not the drubs, you still have to HIT THE BALL!!! No one talks about speculation of the league juicing up the baseballs to get more fans into the stands. It goes both ways!!! I totally disagree All 3 should stay on the books and be voted in the hall should their names be called. The league did not investigate the players during all the excitement surrounding their pursuits only after they money was made and the hooray died down!!!

I'm not a Yankee fan by any stretch, but I'd like to see Judge break the record. Seems like a genuinely likable guy who has done it the right way, unlike cheaters Bonds, Sosa and McGuire.

All 3 should have been erased from the record books years ago.

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@kaimycahl - unless you've played pro ball, you aren't allowed to comment on mlb?

So, what was it? Did you make the big leagues or were you stuck at triple A? What organization did you play for?

Meanwhile back on earth, I played competitively up until a rotator cuff injury ended my playing career in high school. Was a pretty good shortstop if I do say so myself.

Its clear you have very little idea about the sport and the history of the sport.

Bonds, McGuire and Sosa all ballooned in muscle mass over the same few years in the steroid era. Starting right around '96.

Sosa and Bonds, as a matter of fact, were lean, 185lbs or so. Sosa was a peripheral minor leaguer at best and suddenly hit 66 home runs. Was found to have corked his bat as well. Without steroids, you'd have never heard of his name.

Bonds was a consistent 30-35 home run guy until he started doping. Nothing approaching the ridiculous number of 60.

Mcguire was a solid homerun hitter whose personal best was 49 up until '96 when the steroid era kicked into high gear.

Suddenly hes hitting 60-70 a year.

But you didn't know any of this, did you?

Thats because you're not a student of the game like I am.

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@kaimychal although your entire premise that steroids don't give an advantage is totally bogus as I've pointed out, I DO agree with your conclusion at the end of your post.

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It's funny hearing people say "steroids don't help your performance if you're a baseball player."

Why do baseball players take them, then?

Wouldn't it be kind of silly to take a drug that you know won't help you?

Obviously, steroids DO enhance performance. Who would even think about taking them if they didn't?

They're not going to turn a guy like me into a good baseball player, of course. One already has to be a good baseball player to begin with.

But they do help make a player bigger and stronger, enhance the results and gains from his workouts, and help him recover from injuries faster.

So, yes, they do make a difference. But at a physical-health price long-term.

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Pujols, meanwhile, is somewhat improbably closing in on the 700-homer mark after hitting 12 since the start of August.

For the record, since the article doesn't mention it, Pujols is sitting at 698 at the time of commenting, and thus 2 away from that 700 mark.

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