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Bolt says he could have won Tokyo Olympics 100 meters

11 Comments
By Talek HARRIS

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11 Comments
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With or without rigorous drug testing?

Wow, pretty low to try and insinuate the greatest Olympian of all time, proven clean over and over through hundreds of tests conducted over more than a decade, would stoop to cheating.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Lost some of my respect for him when I see his PepsiCo sponsor.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Why this kind of boasting deserve a whole article on this site is beyond me.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

Ah, could have, should have, would have.... we'll never know, and most of us don't care. He should be happy with what he's done, not what he thinks he could have but could not.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Well I would have loved to have seen him participate and win. But since he chose not to run anymore, I think he needs to be quiet and give some respect to the winner. And on the subject of Olympic sprinting, has there been any news of the cheating Brit in the relay? Are they still letting the team keep their medals even after testing positive?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Good ‘ole Bolt.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Descendent.....

Wow, pretty low to try and insinuate the greatest Olympian of all time, proven clean over and over through hundreds of tests conducted over more than a decade, would stoop to cheating.

You obviously know very little about drug testing, especially drug testing in Jamaica.

It is a little more than a joke. Neither Marion Jones or Lance Armstrong failed a test.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Drug testing in Jamaica, is purposefully lackadaisical and basely non-existent. As an expert on PEDS said, in the Olympic finals of the 100 meters, all of the participants are drugged. He also added that it is impossible to run the posted times without the use of PEDs. He cited Bolt's time and improvement:

Bolt's time dropped from 9.79 to 9.58 - such is impossible without PEDs.

And yet, despite the number of fellow competitors that have received various different bans for illegal doping, Usain Bolt has remained relatively immune to both criticism and also, importantly, scrutiny. In a sport marred, bruised and almost broken by scandal, Bolt has emerged in the eyes of fans and press alike as a shining beacon of achievement, but also charm, charisma and a laid back attitude that has turned the starting blocks from a place of intense and unwavering concentration into a pre-race competition of who can appear the most relaxed and joyous.

Prior to 2008, Usain Bolt’s best times in the 100m and 200m were 10.03 and 19.75 respectively.

In less that 12 months between 2007 and 2008, Usain Bolt moved from a promising sprinter, to the fastest man alive. It was the greatest period of improvement in his adult life, and one that he has never matched since. Incredibly though, he got even faster the next year (just not by as much).

At the 2009 World Championships in August, Bolt eased through the 100 m heats, clocking the fastest ever pre-final performance of 9.89 seconds. In the final, Bolt improved his world record with a time of 9.58 s to win his first World Championship gold medal. Taking over a tenth of a second off the previous best mark, this was the largest ever margin of improvement in the 100 m world record since the beginning of electronic timing.

Bolt’s times are just in a different league to the most gifted sprinters to ever grace the Earth. They are so far out from expected improvements in running times even when accounting for a gradual improvement as the years pass due to increases in understanding, improvement in training and sport science.

Of the 8 fastest men ever recorded, Bolt is the only one never to have been caught doping. Bolt remains the only one of the top 8 never to have been found doping.

Jamaica has the worst ratio of bans-to-athletes of any Olympic nation between 2008 and 2012.

Over 80% of Olympic athletes are purported to use PEDs.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

He added that he would "definitely" have taken the knee to protest against racism on the Tokyo podium

Wow I am so glad he did not compete in the Tokyo Olympics. The act of kneeling during the playing of your own countries (or a competitors) National Anthem is divisive in the extreme and is itself an act of bigotry that should not be tolerated. The point of the Olympics is to foster goodwill among nations and settle our differences via sport. Promoting racial strife does against the Olympics.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

And yet, despite the number of fellow competitors that have received various different bans for illegal doping, Usain Bolt has remained relatively immune to both criticism and also, importantly, scrutiny.

He was under the same scrutiny all Olympic athletes are under. They re-test over the years. Sorry, but your whole argument against Bolt comes down to 'I think he must have cheated, how dare everyone not condemn him for that'. Sour grapes.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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