tennis

Osaka dominant on return to action in Japan

16 Comments
By Jim Armstrong

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Osaka became the first Japanese player to win a Grand Slam singles title when she upset 23-time Grand Slam champion Serena Williams on Sept. 8 in New York.

She became the first Japanese-Haitian/Haitian-Japanese to win a Grand Slam singles event.!

Let's be fair and if you absolutely just have to include her ethnicity and nationalities, she is a dual US-Japanese citizen, at least for the time being!

3 ( +8 / -5 )

I watched the match on TV here in the US. Naomi clocked a serve at 197kph (122mph). 9 aces altogether. And I think 24 winners. Her astonishing great forehand kept Dominika on her heels, and she too is an excellent player. All I can say is WOW ! I'm really looking forward to watching Naomi's rise to the #1 player in the world.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Congrats Naomi.

She'd have to stumble really hard to lose this tournament.

But in fairness to Dominika, Naomi (Japanese) is so Big & Powerful against the small Slovakians - lol.

That story thankfully seems to have disappeared from the Japanese mindset over recent years, esp re sports.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

The press has been reporting that Naomi Osaka is a dual-citizen which is false because Japan does not allow dual-citizenship.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

jazz350Today  09:32 am JST

“The press has been reporting that Naomi Osaka is a dual-citizen which is false because Japan does not allow dual-citizenship.”

She is still only 20 years old. Dual citizenship is allowed for people of her age.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

The press has been reporting that Naomi Osaka is a dual-citizen which is false because Japan does not allow dual-citizenship.

As educator has mentioned, dual-citizenship is explicitly allowed at her age. And that said, in practice, Japan does allow dual citizenship for adults, but it's a loophole of sorts.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Well done Naomi!

At turning 20 she had to chose Japanese or the other citizenship - this is the Japanese law. The loophole is not to report that one has second passport - something many Japanese with born in US kids do. I just don't see how she can maintain such status - not possible in her case as she is too famous!

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

At turning 20 she had to chose Japanese or the other citizenship - this is the Japanese law. The loophole is not to report that one has second passport

That's not exactly how it works.

The law is that at 20 (though the specific age is the one thing I'm not entirely sure about), dual-citizens have to either give up their Japanese citizenship, or declare an intent to give up their foreign citizenship. All they have to do is declare that intent. Some countries will not allow one to give up their citizenship. Others will not divulge whether or not one is a citizen when asked.

Not reporting the second passport is just not rubbing it in their face that even though intent was declared, follow through did not happen.

This is Asia, where loopholes sometimes exist on purpose.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

The endless and same circular discussions around her nationality is getting to be really old.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

“At turning 20 she had to chose Japanese or the other citizenship - this is the Japanese law”

Not correct. She is supposed to choose by the time she turns 22.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

For all those posting inaccurate information, please study up:

http://www.moj.go.jp/ENGLISH/information/tcon-01.html

1 ( +2 / -1 )

She became the first Japanese-Haitian/Haitian-Japanese to win a Grand Slam singles event.! 

Let's be fair and if you absolutely just have to include her ethnicity and nationalities, she is a dual US-Japanese citizen, at least for the time being!

The article is about a tennis game but all the above nonsense kept alive on this site says something about the level of some posters :)

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

The article is about a tennis game but all the above nonsense kept alive on this site says something about the level of some posters :)

The following is from the article:

Osaka was born in Japan to a Haitian father and Japanese mother. They were both in attendance Wednesday.

The shy 20-year-old Osaka, who has spent most of her life in the United States and lives in Florida, has been in the spotlight both on and off the court since return in Japan last Thursday.

The article does say something about her ethnicity and nationalities. Next time read the WHOLE piece before writing any comment.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

She is cute. She is powerful. She is awkward. She is funny. I love her.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The article does say something about her ethnicity and nationalities. Next time read the WHOLE piece before writing any comment

You're right, I should have mentioned the AP article as a piece of mediocre journalism as well. What is the use of repeating facts where everybody is familiar with by now given the number of threads on this issue since she won the US Open.

What the level of the posts concerns, read them in the context of the article :)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Not correct. She is supposed to choose by the time she turns 22.

and

For all those posting inaccurate information, please study up:

http://www.moj.go.jp/ENGLISH/information/tcon-01.html

Thank you. I've been unclear on the age, having heard both 20 and 22 over the years, without ever being able to confirm which.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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