beijing 2022 winter olympics

China's bubble bullet trains start Winter Olympics venue dash

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Too bad the efforts, resources and funding for such ambitious projects are to serve a small elite rather than the general public.

If you knew how cheap the tickets for high speed rail in China were, you wouldn't be saying that. It's much cheaper than flying too. I remember taking the HSR from Shanghai to the next city, about 45 minutes away. We weren't able to secure seats for the return journey so opted for standing only. When it came to taking the train at night, we decided to take the highway bus instead because there were seats and the HSR tickets were so cheap we didn't feel we lost any money by not taking the train. If I remember correctly, the money we paid would just about get us from Tokyo to Shinagawa on the Shinkansen.

It's in China's interest to make HSR tickets affordable so that most people can travel while avoiding planes, boost the economy and development.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

If you knew how cheap the tickets for high speed rail in China were, you wouldn't be saying that.

YOu should read the article. The lead states it's

"a special bullet train service to speed athletes to Winter Olympics venues in a bubble separating them from the rest of the population."

It ends in March 16. And it only cost 9.2 billion dollars.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

It ends in March 16. And it only cost 9.2 billion dollars.

The line cost 9.2 billion dollars, not the special Olympics service, which doesn't even occupy a whole train and obviously will go back to normal operation after the Olympics.

Multiple carriages are within a "closed loop" separated from the others by an empty isolation cabin, she said.

There are also limited seats outside the sealed areas for regular commuters.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

China has a pretty impressive rail network already, so it makes sense they'd be able to offer this. I would like to see what their plans are for post-Olympics. Most likely I would assume repurposing it into a regular commuter line, but we will see.

@InspectorGadget

That is kind of a silly claim, technologies propagate all the time one way or the other, it is crazy to say other places shouldn't take and adapt effective technologies.

Would you return your cellphone since western nations copied that one too? Of course not.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Another Chinese high-speed rail miracle?

Brings back memories of Wenzhou on July 23, 2011.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The issue isn't whether China has good trains or a good high speed rail network. It definitely does.

The issue is that however good its infrastructure has recently become, China still has an authoritarian tech-dystopian system of government with terrible human rights abuses.

These Olympics are a PR sportswashing exercise for that government, and I won't be watching a single minute.

@addfwyn

Yes, it will go back to being a regular passenger line after the Olympics. It has already been in service as one for a couple of years, with trains running on through to Hohhot in Inner Mongolia.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

As usual, based on stolen Japanese technology

https://japan-forward.com/japans-transfer-of-bullet-train-technology-a-mistake-china-of-course-has-copied-it/

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Lies, deceit, intimidation, harassment, imprisonments, disappearing people. If you attend, then you condone

this Regium.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

jeff lee:

It ends in March 16. And it only cost 9.2 billion dollars.

Oh, I see. So they're going to stop that service and dismantle the bullet train line from Beijing to Zhangjiakou after the Olympics has finished. Silly me.

As usual, based on stolen Japanese technology

Oh blah blah blah. As if Japan and other countries haven't copied from others. This is how the whole world develops and progresses. Perhaps you'd like Japan to stop producing tofu, paper, rice and all the other things that came from China.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

That's an amazing service. Too bad the efforts, resources and funding for such ambitious projects are to serve a small elite rather than the general public.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

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