Naomi Osaka Photo: REUTERS file
tennis

Osaka sued by ex-junior coach over 20% of earnings: report

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This is quite a simple case, where is that contract? where is that signature? 1; Here is the contract and signature, then pay up 2; no contract or signature, good by!

8 ( +12 / -4 )

Interesting little problem here. If, say, the contract did exist how would it work?

A parent can sign a contract on behalf of their child, but one the child legally becomes an adult and was not a signatory to that contract, is it still valid.

I would guess if it exists, he has a claim to 20% of her winnings until she became an adult. In most counties this is 18 years.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

There is no way he can claim any right to her earnings after she turned 18. She didn't sign the contract herself, so it is simply not valid. Otherwise, parents could sign their children into a lifetime of servitude. Some guy with a million dollar gambling debt and a 14 year old son could sign away his son's adult earnings, for example.

And "indefinite period"? No such thing in any legitimate contract.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Worse, he just coached her for a while when she was a kid. A total scam artist.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Apparently the guy tried to handle it quietly, but Max told him to go get a lawyer and the ex-coach heeded his advice. Maybe he shoulda just given him some money.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

@inspectorgadget and comanteer

A parent can sign a contract on behalf of their child, but one the child legally becomes an adult and was not a signatory to that contract, is it still valid.

It would still be valid.

parents could sign their children into a lifetime of servitude.

Put that way such a contract would seem to be invalid because it would go against public policy.

And "indefinite period"? No such thing in any legitimate contract.

Right, the terms of a valid contract have to be sufficiently certain.

I too think there was probably no binding contract at all. Just going from the facts in the article.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Brian WhewayToday  05:05 pm JST

“This is quite a simple case, where is that contract? where is that signature? 1; Here is the contract and signature, then pay up 2; no contract or signature, good by!”

The TV news has been showing a copy of the contract, of course it could be a fake, but it could also be an actual unfaked document. But that doesn’t necessarily make it a valid, binding agreement.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

but it could also be an actual unfaked document. But that doesn’t necessarily make it a valid, binding agreement.

Signed contracts tend to be valid and binding, but we'll see.

1 - is there a contract?

2 - is it signed by both parties?

3 - is it legal?

4 - how long is it legal for?

There are a lot of hurdles to clear! My guess is that they will end up settling out of court.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

He's not going to get it.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

"Indefinite" does not mean "unlimited." If the former term was not defined, the contract is invalid.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

And so the truth comes out.

No wonder she dumped him. It was hardly a mutually agreeable split, more like a bitter divorce.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

oldman_13Today  09:57 pm JST

“And so the truth comes out.

No wonder she dumped him. It was hardly a mutually agreeable split, more like a bitter divorce.”

Do you, by any chance, think this article is about Sascha Bajin? It’s not.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Yeah, I don't think Bajin would work for free to put himself in this position. As for Mr. Jean, it may be that he thinks indefinite is like infinite, when it should say undetermined or non-defined. Sneaky word choice by somebody.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

If the contract is real, it is binding, plain and simple. I'm guessing this is part of the reason he was let go -- more money -- and clearly it was not amicable as some have said (even them, I think). Now that they didn't pay him more, as I'm sure they wish they had, this is coming out. Even if they beat it, it is damaging if he does indeed have a signed contract.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I meant to add, they will be looking to settle this as quietly as they can (can't do it as quietly as they would have liked) before it gets even worse. Of course, now he's going to want millions more.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

He is just a PUNK YANK, trying on a scam. And even if true, trump will take 50% in tax.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I thought only women sue over men but this time man sueing a woman. Well, as the Asian society is crazy but the whole western world is crazyness.

When a person is miserably failure, he/she attacks any possible for the easy sleazy life.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

If the contract is real, it is binding, plain and simple. I'm guessing this is part of the reason he was let go -- more money -- and clearly it was not amicable as some have said (even them, I think). 

It's not binding. And you seem to think this is the coach she recently let go. It's not. It's a Haitian coach from when she was 14 years old, well before anyone knew she would hit the big time.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

It'll most likely be a settlement with help from the courts

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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