soccer

Europe's clubs divided over Champions League reform

6 Comments
By Eric BERNAUDEAU

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The reforms include the introduction of weekend fixtures, four groups of eight, and a tiered system with relegation and promotion that would see the top six teams in each group automatically qualify for the following year's competition.

Right then, let's have a look at this. Currently in the Champions League teams play a maxiumum of 13 games if they get to the final. Under the ECA proposal it seems they would play 14 games in the initial group stage. After that it's anyones guess, but I presume the top 4 progress to a round of 16, QF, Semis then final. Potentially 21 games. That's a lot of games. If you add 38 games in their national leagues, plus cup games you are looking at well over 60 games per season. Something has to give.

From a Liverpool fans point of view, I'd like to know where my club stands on this. I'm guessing the owners are for it, as it virtually ring-fences the income of the biggest clubs indefinitely at the expense of aspiring clubs.

In short, I think it's a step too far and I don't like it.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

No all a bad idea.Players are playing too many games already. International games too. Kloop at Liverpool says there should be less games not more. It's too dangerous for the physical health of the players.

The priority for English football must be the league and everything else comes after that.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

No all a bad idea.

Which bit? The ECA / UEFA proposal ensures 8 more games a season must be played.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

There should be less Champion Leagues games not more. Otherwise what gives are the hamstrings!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The German clubs should be running European and even World football. Not an Agenlli of Fiat.

A good example would be Borussia Dortmund where season tickets and ticket prices are capped, and where fans have ownership of the club.

The German clubs are setting a positive example in modern football.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

These big clubs with their blatant greed have no shame.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

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