sumo

Grand champion Kisenosato retires from sumo

26 Comments
By Jim Armstrong

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

26 Comments
Login to comment

That's a damn shame. My heart goes out to him.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

It wasn't hard to see this coming after yesterday. Now, without a Japanese Yokozuna and the scandals of last year, watch sumo interest decline greatly. It's sad, but due to Japanese racism, interest in sumo of late has been propped up only because of a Japanese yokozuna. They better find another one quickly to promote prematurely.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

It is unfortunate, but was inevitable.

However, having said that, Kisenosato should never have been promoted to yokozuna in the first place. Nothing against him, but it was premature.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

12 top division runner up performances, 2 top division wins (1 as Yokozuna), pulled out of 7 tournaments (including this one) and 4 tournament sit outs.

Not the worst Yokozuna, but certainly bad. Certainly an example of a double standard.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Bye bye, Yokozuna Kisenosato. It is regrettable to retire, but injuries prevented him being better. He will become a Stable Master now and manage his own team of wrestlers. His status as Yokozuna will stay with him forever. I hope JSA can promote another Japanese to Yokozuna very soon.

-10 ( +2 / -12 )

It's sad, but due to Japanese racism, interest in sumo of late has been propped up only because of a Japanese yokozuna. They better find another one quickly to promote prematurely.

Actually, I am not so sure about that.

While obviously having a strong, enthusiastic Japanese yokozuna helps the sport, what I think fans crave, more than anything else, are strong, competitive rikishi engaging in awesome matches. And that is especially true at the sanyaku level.

Most Japanese sumo fans I know really love and respect Hakuho, even though he is Mongolian. It is because he is passionate, respects the sport, and respects those before him, none more than Taiho!

What they crave is basho after basho of at least 3 or 4 strong rikishi constantly battling it out for the yusho. Of course, the idea of a native Japanese yokozuna being in the mix is very appealing, but what they want, more than anything, is a vibrant, competitive sport, with rikishi that they can actually support, whether Japanese or non-Japanese.

For the record, my Japanese father-in-law, who is retired and living in the chiho, loves Hakuho and thinks he is more of a traditional Japanese rikishi of old than the Japanese rikishi of today.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

I realize that this article is about the fall of Kisenosato, however the part about women being "ritually unclean" is the part that I will remember.  So much of Japan is controlled by the oyaji blue bloods and sumo is no different.  Kisenosato is mearly the latest victim of such thinking.  Hope he can rise above.

S

3 ( +5 / -2 )

He was a great Ozeki.

It's sad, but due to Japanese racism, interest in sumo of late has been propped up only because of a Japanese yokozuna.

I agree with zones2surf on this, its completely incorrect. Of course one would have to be blind to miss the underlying racial motivations surrounding Kisenosato's promotion and some (many) fan's views on that. But its not true at all that sumo's popularity was being propped up by that, attendance has been strong for years dating back to way before Kisenosato became Yokozuna and during an era when Japanese wrestlers weren't winning championships at all let alone making Yokozuna.

Media attention tends to swell a bit when a Japanese wrestler wins the championship or gets promoted, but most fans don't seem to care about the nationality of the wrestlers they are watching.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Sadly sumo is very corrupt.. Match fixing and yakuza involvement as was reported in the past.. Image is very tainted..

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Good. Let the sport die with him and the racist bigots who insisted on his undeserved rise, and who are now silent about this. Let it go back to its Shinto roots and being a ceremony.

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

This news may turn out to be just a distraction from the main event, which is the rebellion being fomented by former stablemaster Takanohana, who's been dominating the news cycle more than the politicians of late. The latest tabloid headline predicts he's on the verge of establishing a "new religion" based on Shinto, with him as the leader. Takanohana (or Koji Hanada if you prefer) may have found a bully pulpit to complain about his pet peeve of too much influence by foreigners in sumo.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I hope JSA can promote another Japanese to Yokozuna very soon.

Only if one of them actually earns it.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I rarely read good news about Sumo, it is sad that they are required to step down completely due some losses from injury.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

He was never very good or deserving of being Yokozuna. He was just a token to give people some national pride after a Mongolian broke their Sumo record. They forced out Asashoryu, best Sumo wrestler of his generation before he broke it, but they still couldn't stop progress!

It is no different than the J-baseball league not allowing foreigners to break Japanese records, or Nissan being taken over by a foreign company!

Takanohana (or Koji Hanada if you prefer) may have found a bully pulpit to complain about his pet peeve of too much influence by foreigners in sumo.

He wouldn't have complained if his record wasn't broken.

Good ole J-mediocrity!

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Wakanohana back in the day was a better Ozeki and even he crumbled under Yokozuna promotion. It's a hard level to attain and maintain which should garner more respect for the position. Kisenosato's promotion was unfortunately just wishful thinking.

You'd think with the former Takanohana around, a former Yokozuna himself and younger brother to Wakanohana, the JSA would have learned that lesson

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Glad it's over, had become hard to watch tbh. I genuinely feel sorry for kisenosato who's a victim of the system (and to a lesser extent 'circumstances', bad luck, injuries etc).

The JSA promoted a guy who was either not yokozuna material or was already past his prime when he got promoted. I don't blame him for not turning down the promotion; just hope he has no regrets.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Not the worst Yokozuna, but certainly bad. Certainly an example of a double standard.

Really? He won 1 tournament as a Yokozuna and after that it was literally all down hill from there. Pray tell of any other yokozuna in recent history that came even close to having a worse showing in less of a time?

As of right now he IS probably, by far, the worst yokozuna ever.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

You'd think with the former Takanohana around, a former Yokozuna himself and younger brother to Wakanohana, the JSA would have learned that lesson.

I see you dont pay much attention to sumo do you?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

it is sad that they are required to step down completely due some losses from injury.

You are mistaken here, Kisenosato was not forced to step down due to losses from injury, he stepped down because he could not compete at the level expected of a Yokozuna here.

None of his loses in this tournament were due to injury, he just got beat by people who did a better job than him!

The sumo association needs to get back to the days when it was almost a 100% requirement that an Ozeki had to win two tournaments in a row prior to promotion.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Really? He won 1 tournament as a Yokozuna and after that it was literally all down hill from there. Pray tell of any other yokozuna in recent history that came even close to having a worse showing in less of a time?

Futahaguro beats him hands down as worst Yokozuna ever. His resume:

Zero tournament wins before or after promotion;

Lasted eight mediocre tournaments as Yokozuna before being forcibly retired after an argument in which he hit his stablemaster's wife.

Followed up with lackluster career in pro wrestling.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I would add that Kisenosato was not only pulling in the highest salary despite his string of non-appearances, but each time he lost another bout, the association had to fork over a princely sum to his opponent as a "kinboshi" bonus. So just keeping him on the payroll was a money-losing proposition.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The youngest member of the nine-person Yokozuna Deliberation Council will turn 70 in a couple of weeks. Maybe it is time for a few more retirements to be announced?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

rainyday agree.

Compared to the Kisenosato "wink-wink" sudden Yokozuna promtion, Futahaguro's rise was an example of a JSA venture into incestuous chaos.

From all accounts Kisenosato was a nice guy, a nice ozeki but never really Yokozuna material. Futahaguro was known as Not a nice guy, who relied on his youthful exuberance to move up, but quickly slid down the slope after his "false" promotion.

WIthout doubt the worst yokozuna ever. An embarrassment to the sumo world with all the blame at the feet of the JSA.

And Kisenosato not so far behind, but for very different reasons.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Futahaguro beats him hands down as worst Yokozuna ever. His resume:

Fair enough, I literally forgot about this guy and you are quite correct!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Very sad, so sorry for him ...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Wasn't it Harumafuji who caused Kisenosato's career-ending injury?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites