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Japanese drivers try to break through in Formula 1 but face linguistic and geographical barriers

30 Comments
By STEPHEN WADE

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Japanese drivers try to break through in Formula 1 but face linguistic and geographical barriers

Welcome to our world.

-9 ( +11 / -20 )

Some Japanese sportsman fortunate enough to have interpreter, remember Ippei Mizuhara scandal?

However the rest of them just need to deal language barriers on daily basis on their own.

https://soranews24.com/2017/02/20/japanese-pool-player-gives-hilarious-english-interview-complete-with-ppap-reference%E3%80%90video%E3%80%91/

This one slightly better

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8XJjcxP7kEI

.

It just represent average Japanese problem when need to speak language other than Japanese, what J Govt has been done about this?

-8 ( +9 / -17 )

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8XJjcxP7kEI

”Don’t touch my mustache.”

Hilarious!

0 ( +7 / -7 )

As someone who follows motorcycle racing (MotoGP & WSBK) Japanese riders aren't cutting it there either. Honda and Yamaha are really struggling in MotoGP too.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

He also said European drivers typically start racing at a younger age than drivers in Japan. He also added in cultural and linguistic barriers. Both Iwasa and Tsunoda speak English well and do interviews in English.

They also start learning and using English as a second language much earlier and aren't embarrassed to make mistake.

9 ( +11 / -2 )

They certainly have the talent, they just don't get the opportunities. In the past there was discrimination : the thought was that Japanese men did not have the strength to handle a F1 car. Of course laughable.

F1 is basically all European teams (with one based in the US). Japanese top notch drivers like Yuki Tsunoda are able to match it with the best of the best. Tsunoda should be in the Red Bell senior team alongside Verstappen, he has earned it.

Wishing all drivers, teams and F1 fanatics a very successful Japanese GP.

-2 ( +10 / -12 )

Move to EU and live and race there. Use English and learn all the technical vocab, or they'll never be able to communicate effectively with the engineers and team principal. Learn from Haas' new team principal, Komatsu. His example as the first Japanese team principal in F1 should be the standard for any aspiring Japanese driver. Komatsu moved from Tokyo and earned his PhD from a university in London and became Haas' Chief Race Engineer and Engineering Director before taking over after Gunther Steiner's departure. Komatsu still lives in the UK. Senna also moved from Brazil to EU when he was young, it takes that kind of commitment.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Perhaps they don't start early enough but there have been over 20 Japanese F1 drivers since 1975. There are plenty of developmental series like F4 Japan and F2 and F3 which are based in Europe. They've known that they have to start earlier for a long time. Maybe if they did start earlier, they'd have the IT factor to win a championship or finish in the top 3 but so far after more than 20 drivers, no real results. Develop skills earlier but claiming language and communication are barriers are just excuses. Personally, I think the current F1 Japanese driver Yuki Tsunoda is a dead end. Four seasons and his best finish was 11th. To get a seat on the top teams, which is critical in F1, you have to put in much better results. Rumours that his current team got orders from engine manufacturer Honda, that Tsunoda must stay on the team when they started considering other drivers.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Great clickbait for anyone who has ever had to teach EFL in Japan.

My oh my, I was triggered!

It was written:

Both Iwasa and Tsunoda speak English well and do interviews in English.

Then he totally contradicts this in the interview with:

Japanese don’t speak as much good English.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Japanese don’t speak as much good English.

Pretty much a glaring mistake there!

However, unless there is a revamp of language teaching in Japanese schools then Japanese youngsters will never achieve any type of linguistic prowess that is common in Europe.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Because English acquisition is critical to driving cars exceedingly fast.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Quote: “So it’s hard to communicate well, and tell what you want specifically from the car — setup, for example. These things will take a little bit of time.”

You also need to understand, in incredibly noisy conditions, what they are asking you to go out and do each lap.

You can drive fast and look like an idiot if you are not doing the rght thing.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Because English acquisition is critical to driving cars exceedingly fast.

Well argued. Fluent English is not needed - just as the best ballplayer in the world - Ohtani - cannot communicate in English. There are at least 1000 more important skills to master than English.

The language thing seems like an excuse to keep people from non-english speaking nations out. Ironically, the greatest F1 drivers in history have been non-native English speakers - the Sennas, Fangios, Schumacher's, and Prosts etc.

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

Tsunoda lives in the UK and speaks reasonable English so not sure what linguistic and geographical barriers the writer is referring to. The Edo period is over right

3 ( +6 / -3 )

The language thing seems like an excuse to keep people from non-english speaking nations out.

Utter rubbish.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

Tsunoda should be in the Red Bell senior team alongside Verstappen, he has earned it.

Get real, please.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Get real, please.

Trust me, Yuki is quick. He will do well this weekend. Put him in the Red Bull car and you may be shocked at how he performs against Max.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

“The same for all non native speakers in a foreign country”

How could my above post be removed and considered off topic when your title is about linguistic barrier.

I am neither an English or Japanese native speaker, living for decades in countries where the language barrier has been an issue but perseverance in learning the language has been the key.

This is the same for those drivers. And how can Othani not make himself any interview in English after spending so long time in the US.

Of course, the talent of sports players is the key for them,

0 ( +2 / -2 )

If the writer wants to write a story on why Japanese don’t succeed fine, but to blame it on language and geography is just lazy

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Fighto!Today  01:28 pm JST

Get real, please.

Trust me, Yuki is quick. He will do well this weekend. Put him in the Red Bull car and you may be shocked at how he performs against Max.

Drivers on weaker teams have to prove they belong on the top teams and Tsunoda hasn't proven anything. All the drivers are quick so you have to show you're consistently faster than others. His best result was 11th in four years. His behavior is terrible too. Temper tantrums, swearing and cursing everyone. Just another mediocre Japanese driver like all the rest before him

1 ( +4 / -3 )

They seem surprised the rest of the world does not understand that Japanese should be the world’s leading language.

there is the real problem that the dept sight of Japanese people is less good. That causes drivers to break earlier and goalkeepers to misjudge on high balls.

Most Japanese drivers just get a seat because Japanese engine providers push the real managers. Funny none of them mentions it. Of course many other drivers get seats because of rich daddy’s.(Stroll) Or heritage ( Verstappen). in any case a driver can not win the race today, but he can loose it. The race win is determined only by the chassis/engine package and the tyres. The driver is 2 % in the win projection but can with one mistake loose the race

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Fluent English is not needed - just as the best ballplayer in the world - Ohtani - cannot communicate in English. There are at least 1000 more important skills to master than English.

> The language thing seems like an excuse to keep people from non-english speaking nations out. Ironically, the greatest F1 drivers in history have been non-native English speakers - the Sennas, Fangios, Schumacher's, and Prosts etc.

Given the importance of the car, the mechanics that support them, and the poor team, English is important. If you watch any race you'll hear the almost continual communication over the radio between the team and the driver. The fact you didn't suggests you haven't been watching much F1.

Some sports are better for those with poor language skills - golf and tennis as largely solo skills. I would also add baseball - while a team game, a lot of it is quite solo - each player does his "thing" and together make a team.

Other sports where the situations are more fluid rely more on ongoing communications. Japanese soccer players tend to pick up the local language quickly because it is more important.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Just listening to radio communications between drivers and engineers today at Suzuka, some of the foreign drivers spoke pretty poor English, which was made even more incomprehensible by the noise and static.

It's musical chairs though. Raw talent will break through sure, given a smattering of luck, but it needs a raft of others factors for a seat to actually come together for you. Tsunoda has a prime seat in a Red Bull; all he has to do now is show maturity and consistency.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Given the importance of the car, the mechanics that support them, and the poor team, English is important. If you watch any race you'll hear the almost continual communication over the radio between the team and the driver. The fact you didn't suggests you haven't been watching much F1.

Exactly.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Tsunoda hasn't proven anything. All the drivers are quick so you have to show you're consistently faster than others. His best result was 11th in four years. His behavior is terrible too. Temper tantrums, swearing and cursing everyone. Just another mediocre Japanese driver like all the rest before him.

Yes.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Haven’t watched much motor sport at all recently, which is terrible considering a family member recently signed up to a big name, but it seems the driver needs to be able to communicate to the team through a single engineer on the other end. As part of a team it’s up to both to make it work.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Get real, please.

He's an excellent driver. He's making Riccardo look like a smiley grandma on a Sunday outing so far this season. It's not his fault he's driving a sh*tbox. The temper tantrums are not new for any driver on the grid. Shows he has some fire in his belly. Good lad.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Boom! Japanese GP & all the pressure that comes with it, and Yuki is in the points, stuffs every other car in his class and one car that is better (albeit with a substandard driver).

Yuki's talent definitely deserves a better drive.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Language is a factor , but not the critical one. The most important one is part of the culture and start like this: "the nail that sticks out will be hammered down".

You draw your own conclusions....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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