baseball

MLB, Japanese baseball officials agree on posting system protocol

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Modern day slavery and no one questions anything.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

What if more than one MLB team agrees to pay the max $20 million fee? Does the posted player get to negotiate with those teams like a free agent?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I can't understand why NPB agreed to this deal. They are losing their best players, at least they should get a good payday out of it. 20 million is not bad, but the Nippon Ham got 50 million for Darvish. lostrune2, I think if more than one team bids the 20 million, the player can then negotiate with each team, and take the best offer. Then that team will pay the Japanese team.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Good for MLB teams (lower posting fees), and Japanese players (can negotiate with multiple teams, giving them a bigger contract). Losers are NPB teams who can "only" get $20mil. Remember though, only a few players would have brought more than $20 mil to their teams. Rakuten could have gotten an estimated $70 mil I heard on US sites under the old system of blind bids

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Antiquated and stupid system. Even the changes are not enough. No club deserves to get money to see a player achieve his/her dream of going overseas. It's basically extortion.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

What if more than one MLB team agrees to pay the max $20 million fee? Does the posted player get to negotiate with those teams like a free agent?

As I read this, that's the major change over the old agreement. Before, only the top-bidding team received the right to negotiate with the player because they "paid the most". The team that won the negotiation can low-ball their offer to the player and the player was left with a "take it or leave it" situation. Now with the posting fee locked at no more than $20 million, any team willing to guarantee the $20 million will have the ability to negotiate with the player. This will increase the competition and the player can play one team's offer against another. The end result is a win for the MLB (with reduced posting fees), a win for the player (more choices and higher contracts), and a loss for the NPB (posting fees reduced to $20 million or less per player).

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@ lostrune2. yes. he would then be treated like a free agent .

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Lowering the fee only forces the hand of the Japanese player which is good for the NPB if a team claims the player and takes the fee the player can then negotiate his contract, its either a take it or leave it option, outside of the fee! On the other hand if he doesn't take the offer he stays with his JP team. I think the NPA wins this one

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The NBP only receives the posting fee if the player signs with the MLB team. Where before they could get over twice as much for the posting fee, now they're limited to only up to $20 million - and only from the MLB team that the player ultimately signs with. If the player decides to stay with the NBP, the MLB teams involved in the negotiations do not give the NBP any money. The teams essentially put the $20 million in escrow pending the signing of the player. Once the player signs with an MLB team or declines to sign at all, the escrow accounts dissolve and the money is returned to the teams who weren't chosen by the player. Only the team who was chosen will have the escrow funds transferred to the NBP.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Wealthy MLB teams like Dodgers, Angels, Giants, A. Padres all can sign more Japanese players now. They have eyes on win, win, win.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Smithinjapan, while you may be right, if I'm not mistaken soccer does the same thing. That is why it took Honda so long to get out of Russia, as they kept demanding such a high transfer fee. He had to wait until his contract was done, then he could leave on a free transfer. This system does benefit the player immensely. I remember a few years ago, when Iwakuma first tried the posting system, Oakland bid the highest amount, but they did so, only to stop other teams from signing him. when they started to negotiate they really low-balled him, and he decided to stay with his NPB team, They didn't have to pay the posting money but made sure nobody else got him, and it didn't cost them anything.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

. I remember a few years ago, when Iwakuma first tried the posting system, Oakland bid the highest amount, but they did so, only to stop other teams from signing him. when they started to negotiate they really low-balled him, and he decided to stay with his NPB team, They didn't have to pay the posting money but made sure nobody else got him, and it didn't cost them anything.

I think smith is well aware of the Iwakuma situation, for we all remeber him calling Iwakuma greedy for turning down the said Oakland offer.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

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