The two-time Grand Slam champion is a household name in Japan, where her every move is followed feverishly by local media Photo: AFP/File
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Naomi Osaka picks Japanese citizenship with eye on Olympics: NHK

142 Comments
By NOEL CELIS

Tennis star Naomi Osaka has decided to choose Japanese over American nationality with an eye on the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, public broadcaster NHK reported Thursday.

Osaka, who has a Japanese mother and a Haitian father, told NHK she has completed an administrative step to obtain Japanese citizenship ahead of her birthday next week.

Japanese law stipulates that a Japanese with more than one nationality must chose one before turning 22 years old.

"It gives me a special feeling to try to go to the Olympics to represent Japan," the two-time Grand Slam champion told the broadcaster in an interview in Tokyo.

"I think I will be able to put more of my emotion into it by playing for the pride of the country," she said, according to the article published in Japanese on the NHK website.

Osaka added she wants to aim for the gold although she is also worried as expectations will be high.

The young tennis sensation is a household name in Japan, where her every move is followed feverishly by local media, particularly when she is in the country of her mother's birth.

She is the face of several leading Japanese brands, including the carrier ANA, and "Naomi-chan" -- as she is affectionately known -- was the main attraction at last month's Pan Pacific Open in Osaka, which she won.

But she has faced controversies over her dual heritage in a nation that is fairly racially homogeneous, as well as scrutiny for her imperfect Japanese language skills -- though others insist they add to her charm.

Mixed-race children can often face prejudice in Japan, although attitudes among younger generations are changing.

Osaka became the first Japanese player to win a Grand Slam last year after beating Serena Williams at the U.S. Open.

© 2019 AFP

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

142 Comments

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This is a big mistake for Osaka Naomi.

The US is far more accepting of colored people than Japan is.

Imagine the life after retirement; would she really be happier in Japan than in the US?

Of course Japanese citizenship might be more advantageous in terms of tax rate and sponsorship money, but would she really be happy in Japan for the rest of her life?

It's not too late to reconsider and make the right choice.

-23 ( +25 / -48 )

Japanese law stipulates that a Japanese with more than one nationality must chose one before turning 22 years old.

Yes, but that does not mean they they are required to "throw away" the other they may hold!

4 ( +16 / -12 )

Sorry, but this is a very big mistake for her. She shoul ld NEVER deny one of her identities over the other...

-11 ( +17 / -28 )

Good for her. Really wise decision by Naomi-chan. She feels Japanese, not American, and this proves it. Win that Gold Medal in Tokyo for Japan, Naomi-chan!!

-25 ( +15 / -40 )

This is a big mistake for Osaka Naomi.

Actually it's the smartest move she could make! There is no requirement for her to give up her American citizenship and by choosing her Japanese citizenship it allows her the freedom to keep both!

Of course Japanese citizenship might be more advantageous in terms of tax rate and sponsorship money, but would she really be happy in Japan for the rest of her life?

If you are talking taxes, she would be far better off in the US. She will be paying a HELL of a lot more in taxes here than in the US.

21 ( +27 / -6 )

The US is far more accepting of colored people than Japan is.

Wow, 'colored people'. I'm not usually part of the PC police, but the last time I heard someone say 'colored people', it was an old white woman that didn't realize calling a black man a 'colored fella' was kinda racist...

Osaka is basing her choice on what she feels is best for her career, not how a country treats 'colored people'. I'm not going to judge her for it.

22 ( +30 / -8 )

Mixed-race children can often face prejudice in Japan, although attitudes among younger generations are changing.

The problem isnt with the younger generation, it's with everyone else!

Osaka is basing her choice on what she feels is best for her career, not how a country treats 'colored people'. I'm not going to judge her for it.

Not just her career, but for her life!

12 ( +14 / -2 )

Osaka, who has a Japanese mother and a Haitian father, told NHK she has completed an administrative step to obtain Japanese citizenship ahead of her birthday next week.

I don't get it. She's had Japanese nationality since birth. What administrative step is this? I don't see or read anything about renouncing American citizenship anywhere.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Good for her.

Anyone that presumes to know how she will be treated in Japan as compared to other countries is being plain ignorant.

Many people in Japan celebrate her accomplishments. Some may not but who cares the haters are hardly representative of Japan as a whole.

Good for you Naomi, just learn to speak Japanese more fluently.

-6 ( +10 / -16 )

The US is far more accepting of colored people than Japan is.

I'm not a particularly PC guy, but 'colored' has been considered discriminatory for decades.

3 ( +15 / -12 )

I don't get it. She's had Japanese nationality since birth. What administrative step is this?

It's the declaration that dual-national Japanese children are mean to make, in which they tell the Japanese government which citizenship they intend to go forward with.

People keep trying to discount her as Japanese. She was born in Japan, to a Japanese mother, is a Japanese citizen, and as important as anything, has chosen to represent Japan. The Japanese people like her.

And yet, you have those claiming she's not Japanese, and that the Japanese are racist against her.

I think these people are projecting.

13 ( +18 / -5 )

Sorry, but this is a very big mistake for her. She shoul ld NEVER deny one of her identities over the other...

I haven't seen her denying any of her identities. Has anyone else?

12 ( +16 / -4 )

To clarify. Japan DOES NOT allow for dual citizenship.

I know that in a lot of cases people who have dual nationality accept Japanese citizenship but then don't relinquish the passports for the other country. Japan usually only sends a polite letter asking you to destroy your other passport and never follows up on it. That might not be the case for a public figure like Naomi if the nationalists decide to make an example of her. Just look at what happened to the Japanese politician Rinho a few years back.

This is a good career move but a potentially bad life decision.

12 ( +21 / -9 )

Sorry, that's Renho. Not Rinho.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Yes, but that does not mean they they are required to "throw away" the other they may hold!

This, thanks God that Japan cannot rule other countries policies. But I'm pretty sure the xenophobic Immigration Bureau is going to pressure her to revoke her other passports.

Osaka, who has a Japanese mother and a Haitian father, told NHK she has completed an administrative step to obtain Japanese citizenship ahead of her birthday next week.

I don't get it. She's had Japanese nationality since birth. What administrative step is this? I don't see or read anything about renouncing American citizenship anywhere.

Media is not going to explain what the problem was, as usual. Maybe it was just to request the passport, but they want to make it look condescending?

0 ( +5 / -5 )

That might not be the case for a public figure like Naomi if the nationalists decide to make an example of her. Just look at what happened to the Japanese politician Rinho a few years back.

Renho is not a case to be using here really, as she is an elected politician, not a world-class tennis player!

The laws are quite specific regarding elected officials!

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Euro Dude

Giving up her US citizenship doesn’t mean she is denying her US identity. She can play tennis anywhere in the world with her Japanese passport.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

@Samit Besu

She never said she was giving up her US citizenship. She simply chose to represent Japan. It's the smarter choice because a country can only send a certain amount of delegates. US has a lot more competition. So Japan is more of a sure thing.

Also, if she represents Japan, she won't lose US sponsors. However, representing the US might cause her to lose Japanese sponsors. This is a good career move.

14 ( +14 / -0 )

I think it'd be fair to say USA has a lot more to Osaka's success and standing than Japan. I'm upset sportpeople feel they have to pursue 'other' agendas in their career insteading of focussing on sport.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

The US can only send 4 delegates. Right now the top 5 fighting for a space are Venus, Serena, Coco Gauff, Amanda Anisimova, and Madison Keys. All these girls are currently doing really well. For Osaka to join that fight won't guarantee her a slot in the olympics.

11 ( +14 / -3 )

Sponsorship money was never part of the reason, I'm sure!

oldman_13:

Many people in Japan celebrate her accomplishments.

Exactly. Like her Japanese grandfather. He supports Osaka and loves her and her money. (Although, before she became rich and famous, he wanted nothing to do with her or her parents, but let's not get into specifics here.)

yubaru:

Renho is not a case to be using here really, as she is an elected politician, not a world-class tennis player! The laws are quite specific regarding elected officials!

As many Australian politicians found out, the hard way.

2 ( +9 / -7 )

Well it’s her choice really, all the best to her. Hopefully she can help change people’s negative attitudes about mixed ethnicity.

Please don’t criticise me but if the term ‘coloured people’ (and I don’t use it btw) is not acceptable then what about the term ‘people of colour’?

In a way we are all people of colour are we not? Perhaps we should just drop the word altogether!

1 ( +4 / -3 )

It must have been a hard choice but she seems happy with her decision.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Her life, her choice.

14 ( +14 / -0 )

It must have been a hard choice but she seems happy with her decision.

Why make this assumption? For all we know, it could have been a very easy one! She took the path of the least problems for her, as she can always leave Japan at anytime, and go back to America, and be "American"

At least she has a choice!

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Good for her! She is a great player and deserves a spot on in Olympics based on her skill alone. What team is a matter of strategy given that Japan, as host, gets a spot in every sport and that at least one U.S. team slot is likely to go to the great Serena Williams. This guarantees her a spot and I hope she puts it to good use to meet Serena in the final round. I loved watching the play in the U.S. Open finals in 2018. I look forward to amazing tennis from both athletes next year!!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

JJ Jetplane I think touches on the biggest reason for this story: her sponsors.

According to Wikipedia, the following companies are sponsors of Osaka:

Yonex

Nissan

Citizen Watch

Shiseido

Nissin

WOWOW

ANA

Nike

Notice something? Except for Nike, every one of her sponsors is a Japanese company. And while Yonex and Citizen might continue to sponsor her if she chose not to represent Japan, I can bet yen to doughnuts that the others would drop her like a hot potato if she'd chosen American representation.

Nike, on the other hand, is a truly multinational company without a problem having athletes from many different countries under their sponsorship banner.

Osaka earned approximately $16 million in sponsor money in 2019. Combine that with her near guaranteed Olympic spot if she represents Japan instead of the USA (notice how Haiti's never mentioned for some reason?), it made economic sense for her... IF this story is true. NHK can sometimes be taken with a big grain of MSG.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

A financial decision. That's all it is.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

"The US is far more accepting of colored people than Japan is."

Wow, 'colored people'. I'm not usually part of the PC police, but the last time I heard someone say 'colored people', it was an old white woman that didn't realize calling a black man a 'colored fella' was kinda racist...

At least he didn't say "half-colored, half-oriental."

6 ( +6 / -0 )

 ...would she really be happy in Japan for the rest of her life?

She doesn't have to stay in Japan for the rest of her life in order to be a Japanese citizen. Numerous Japanese live elsewhere without giving up their citizenship.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Gotta start learning japanese then.... right?

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

I know there is some discussion about her identities. As far as I know her father is Haitian. However the fact she has never lived there would probably prevent her from taking up Haitian citizenship (among other reasons)

Financially, she is already pretty much set and has the means to live wherever she wants to.

Good for her; she worked hard to get where she is and it is her choice in the end and I am sure she has thought through all of which we (the great bastions of wisdom) discuss here on the website.

I wish her all the best!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

This is a big mistake for Osaka Naomi.

The US is far more accepting of colored people than Japan is.

Imagine the life after retirement; would she really be happier in Japan than in the US?

Of course Japanese citizenship might be more advantageous in terms of tax rate and sponsorship money, but would she really be happy in Japan for the rest of her life?

It's not too late to reconsider and make the right choice.

dude thats spot on. Its the simple things in life that trip allot of people up. Ignorance of what is right in front of you. Allot of ignorance is propagated by other ignorant people, who claim to be experts.

She will 100% regret it in 10 years. Get the PR, never naturalize.

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

She never said she was giving up her US citizenship

If she becomes Japanese, especially a high profile person in the media spot light, she will have to relinquish her US citizenship, according to Japanese law. Once she signs that paper, I think there is a 1 year window to change ones mind in the US.

After that...good luck on walking it back.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

If she becomes Japanese, especially a high profile person in the media spot light, she will have to relinquish her US citizenship, according to Japanese law. Once she signs that paper, I think there is a 1 year window to change ones mind in the US. After that...good luck on walking it back.

Relinquish? No, she does not have to. Also it is not so easy to "relinquish" American citizenship either. It's costs quite a bit of cash too! Check it out!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The Long Termer, “She will 100% regret it in 10 years. Get the PR, never naturalize.”

She doesn’t need to naturalize, she’s had Japanese citizenship since birth.

As others have said, her life, her decision. I would be surprised if financial concerns were not part of her decision and why wouldn’t they be? But I highly doubt that, as some are implying, they were the sole factor. In any case, I wish her the best and look forward to seeing her play.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

What a waste, she could have made a big deal about wanting to keep both citizenships and make it a big issues in the public eye, possibly putting pressure on the government to reform the system. Sellout.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

The US is far more accepting of colored people than Japan is.

LoL this is almost as good as your CNN comment...

4 ( +5 / -1 )

And she will regret it all the way to the bank, even if her career were to end today, she has enough money to do whatever she wants in life and do whatever she wants...

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I'd suggest this was a neccesary step to ward off the storm of discontent - not at her - but at the govt which dictates that Japanese citizens must renounce other citizenships on reaching the age of 22.

She didn't want any extra-media attention suggesting she was somehow favoured by having dual citizenship and representing japan.

1,000s of people have dual citizenship here with it being a case of don't tell, no problems. But these peoplei n them ain are not under intense media scrutiny, hence the need for Naomi to make a decision.

And the decision she made is reflective of her direction and status over the past years. That of a successful sportswoman with endorsements and sponsorships making her in just 1 year the 2nd richest, only behind Serena. Who's going to jeopardize tens of millions a year and unequalled adoration by giving up their golden egg - in this case Japanese citizenship.

But of course the bigger question is why is this even necessary in the global infrastructure of the modern era with people moving, working, having families around the world.

I've also read somewhere (maybe someone can clarify) that in many cases one cannot renounce their nationality as it's not like a drivers license to be taken away for a reason. Your nationality is your nationality - including dual.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Yubaru makes a good point. The criminal U.S. government is like the mafia (or worse). For those wishing to give up U.S. citizenship there is an exit tax which could be quite hefty for those with a net worth exceeding $2M. Ironically a big proponent of penalizing those for wanting to renounce was non other than Charles Rangel who was the chairman of the Ways and Means committee. The irony is that Rangel was censored by Congress for having business interests in the Caribbean which he did not report on his taxes.

Ms. Osaka will need to pay a hefty tax bill upon her departure but I am sure she has calculated this.

Also, if she is a Japanese citizen residing abroad she will pay much less taxes as a Japanese non resident citizen than as a U.S. citizen.

Regardless I will certainly be rooting for her!!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

This is a big mistake for Osaka Naomi.

The US is far more accepting of colored people than Japan is.

Imagine the life after retirement; would she really be happier in Japan than in the US?

It seems to me she loves Japan more than the US and she thinks Japan has more benefits and more happiness for her whole life. That's why she chooses Japan. This is understandable.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Odd that the story doesnt say where she resides. Because the place she chooses to live is where her real home is.

Anything else is a cold, hard technicality.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Don't worry folks making a mountain out of a molehill. She can still own houses in the U.S. and live there as well.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Stupid law that forces her to choose. She would be the perfect person to challenge the law if she had the guts. Much like Miyazawa Rie did to get pubic hair back in magazines.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Great business move.

Winning the Olympics for America = Americans will yawn.

Winning the Olympics for Japan in Japan? HUGE endorsements from Japan and virtually ZERO downside from the perspective of her potential American endorsements.

Want to later 'change her mind' and become an American citizen? Far, far, far easier in America than claiming American citizenship and then trying to later on get Japanese citizenship.

Not a difficult decision at all.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Of course she can't mention anything about US Tax law being a factor, while certainly is. HUGE penalties from the US if that is deemed to be a factor.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

"We are all colored"

She will keep her American citizenship and will continue to live in America.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Japan needs dual citizenships

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Wonder whether she realizes that after relinquishing US citizenship it's impossible to get a green card...

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Once you give up US citizenship you can never get it back. Go to the end of the line and send in your forms to apply for a visa. If you give up Japanese citizenship however, and your parent is Japanese, you can get it back. I will give up my US passport over my dedd body.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Coloured and a million other racial identification words that fall into favor and disfavor as often as I buy new shoes. Why do so many of you give a darn?

Hafu or half wasn't good enough, so people are saying mixed race....until its decided that mixed race is disparaging and the new word will probably be multi-ethnic or something until that word is deemed racist/bigotted.

The US is far more accepting of colored people than Japan is.

Yeah. BLM was made for laughs. And Colin Kaepernick kneels for fun. I would not want to be a Nigerian in a Japanese detention center, but in full knowledge there are probably thousands of times more Black people in America, I bet the percentage rate of dead Black people on Japanese streets is considerably less. Gee, what is someone to choose between "they don't accept me" and "they might accept me or kill me". Tough choice?

What I cannot figure out is how a woman with a Haitian father and Japanese mother got to be American. I don't follow sports or sports figures so all I have is this article and its not telling.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

In a way we are all people of colour are we not? Perhaps we should just drop the word altogether!

I didn't know WHITE isn't a color.

When it comes to skin color White is not a color, utter nonsense.

We are all citizens of planet earth and breathe the same oxygen.Nationality means nada, what matters most is living a happy and fulfilling life, and it can be realized anywhere.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

There are many Japanese holding dual nationality. She will use her American passport to leave and enter America. Her Japanese passport to leave and enter Japan.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Black is not a color; a black object absorbs all the colors of the visible spectrum and reflects none of them to the eyes.

White is a color. White reflects all the colors of the visible light spectrum to the eyes.

So the whites are the colored?

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Im just gonna assume the people saying that the US is more excepting of "colored people" are not themselves Black. As a black person who also lives in Japan, no. The US is not more accepting. Not by a long shot. Of people have an issue with me it's because I'm obviously foreign not because I'm black. If anything people are much more interested in me and getting to know who I am because I'm black. Also, are you guys missing the whole police killing black people thing or....

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Relinquish is the wrong choice of terms, my bad, as she would have to choose her nationality, whereas I would have to ditch one, accept or take on, another (no worries, I never will do that). She cannot however be both a Japanese citizen and American at the same time, while being legal, in Japan. Many do it I hear, and the US seems to look the other way as those people never voluntarily relinquished their US citizenship, however as some posters here rightly pointed out, as Naomi is such a high profile and mixed race person, plenty of nutters would point out this fact later, if she kept her US nationality. Thats when the real sets in, the heavy, dark mistake made.

Also, I dont think Naomi is aware of the color ism, racism, xenophobia, hyper nationalism, etc that is still quite rampant in Japan. I suggest she consult with other mixed race (the darker the better) people in Japan and ask them their experiences before choosing Japanese citizenship in this place.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

There are many Japanese holding dual nationality. She will use her American passport to leave and enter America. Her Japanese passport to leave and enter Japan.

True, many do it, but its in violation of the law, and its not fair to those who were intimidated or just wanted to do what is legal.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I suspect in the future, that Japan will start to enforce its naturalization policy. I would not want to gamble on the continuation of the grey zone, case by case enforcement, as it is now. I suggest to just choose PR if you love Japan so much; I cant see any benefit of becoming a Japanese, when in reality, your not because your face is not Japanese. This is the kind of binary society your choosing to naturalize in, so why do it, and put yourself through a lifetimes worth of misery?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

TheLongTermer

“If she becomes Japanese,”

She doesn’t need to “become” Japanese, again, she’s had Japanese citizenship since birth.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

“has completed an administrative step to obtain Japanese citizenship”

The article is also in error. She doesn’t need to “obtain” Japanese citizenship, she’s already a dual citizen, which is why the whole choose before turning 22 thing has even come up.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

There is no punishment if people don't give up another nationality to become Japanese. There have been zero court cases so the government just looks the other way.

I guess the majority of children born to dual parents just keep both.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

The US is far more accepting of colored people than Japan is.

How many 'coloured' people shot by police in the US? How many in Japan?

She will be paying a HELL of a lot more in taxes here than in the US.

And getting a lot more back. All those 'tennis elbows', sprained wrists, pulled tendons etc sports people inevitably suffer from - no need to pay extortionate insurance premiums or sky-high medical bills. And very, very little chance of getting shot for being in the wrong place at the wrong time, or for being NWIP (Not White In Public).

Stupid law that forces her to choose

its not fair to those who were intimidated or just wanted to do what is legal.

It is a very, very stupid law; what's not fair is that 'what is legal' is in itself not fair. People with roots in two countries should have the right to be recognised by both countries.

Good luck next year, Naomi-chan.

Invalid CSRF

2 ( +4 / -2 )

The US is far more accepting of colored people than Japan is.

Imagine the life after retirement; would she really be happier in Japan than in the US?

You might have a point if we were talking about the average joe (not even sure about that, very much a case by case thing; dont think the us are a minorities' paradise either)... but we are talking about a sports personality idolized/loved by millions. Fame & money is colour blind, even in japan.

She'd be fine should she decide to live in japan once her playing career is over.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Abut dual citizenship.

The law doesn't require proof that dual citizens gave up their citizenship. It simply says that they have to. Japan also doesn't enforce it. In other media, it simply states that she chose to represent Japan over America. NHK is reporting that she is giving up her citizenship because that is the process that they assume will happen. My wife and her siblings all still have dual citizenship. They are half Japanese. All that was required of them is to check a box when you are applying for your passport. Nothing else happens.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

There are about 4 million Japanese living overseas. 1.5 million living in America.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

There have been zero court cases

Not entirely true.

Nothing else happens.

Unless you're a high-profile individual.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

She cannot however be both a Japanese citizen and American at the same time, while being legal, in Japan.

There is no law that disallows holding dual citizenship in Japan.

I would prove it, but I can't prove non-existence.

If I'm wrong though, someone here will surely post the specific law that disallows Japanese citizens from holding dual citizenship.

I dont think Naomi is aware of the color ism, racism, xenophobia, hyper nationalism, etc that is still quite rampant in Japan. I suggest she consult with other mixed race (the darker the better) people in Japan and ask them their experiences before choosing Japanese citizenship in this place.

One of said people gave their opinion above - why do you think your perspective is more relevant?

The law doesn't require proof that dual citizens gave up their citizenship. It simply says that they have to.

More specifically than that, the law states that one must declare an intent to endeavor to renounce their other citizenship. That's all - an intent. There is no requirement to follow through, or even attempt it for that matter. Nor are there legal means in place to revoke the citizenship of one born Japanese, nor has it ever happened.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Good for her. Really wise decision by Naomi-chan. She feels Japanese, not American

actually her decision isnt purely because she want to forfeit her AMerican citizenship. giving up her Japanese nationality means its almost impossible to get it back. Not so much for foreign countries, some countries dont allow you to forfeit your citizenship and if your a citizen of one of those countries and born in Japan the J government cant force you to choose one nationality. Japan requires you to give up your foreign nationality they have no legal power to force you to do so and if you do in many countries you can apply for citizenship later and the J government has no power to stop you. Being born in Japan the J government cannot void your Japanese nationality its a violation of your basic human rights. Which is precisely why they want you you to do it by your own free will. If your a mixed race child born in Japan always choose J nationality

0 ( +1 / -1 )

She will use her American passport to leave and enter America. Her Japanese passport to leave and enter Japan.

many people dont realise that having dual nationality doesnt mean you have dual passports. you have to apply for that after you obtain citizenship. Being born in Japan they have citizenship by birth.

My children have dual nationality but only a Japanese passport .

2 ( +2 / -0 )

WTF: My daughter has two. It’s legal.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Winning the Olympics for Japan in Japan? HUGE endorsements from Japan and virtually ZERO downside from the perspective of her potential American endorsements.

and to think she wont have to lodge and pay taxes in American even if shes not living there, America is one of only two countries in the world where you have to lodge and pay taxes even is your not a resident but still a citizen. Many high earning Americans relinquish their American citizenship for precisely these reasons.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Winning the olympics, is overrated, especially in tennis, soccer etc, the 4 slams are every tennis players dream of playing and winning, as with the fed cup, she has won two and the way she’s going many more, she will get more being a Japanese citizen, both financially and hopefully will expose more young players to take up the game and get rid of soft tennis, biomechanically completely different to tennis.....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Once again in reference to dual citizenship in Japan.

According to the Japanese law you can only have one citizenship.

The US and most other foreign countries don't care!

So in Naomi's case, I assume she denounced her US citizenship, or if not, she made a decision that violates Japanese laws. But as long as nobody asks ..... who cares.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The US and most other foreign countries don't care!

actually thats not true. Look inside your US passport; there are certain acts that can cause you to loose your citizenship. Its rarely enforced, but I would not put my self into a situation, where say, a US prosecutor, in order to add more chargers to some other charge, could enforce that law.

The law has surely been enforced before, so there is a precedent.

Some dont know, but retired US military people can loose their pension if they naturalize in another country.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Now I have to root against her.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Coloured and a million other racial identification words that fall into favor and disfavor as often as I buy new shoes. Why do so many of you give a darn?

It may puzzle you, and it does me to some extent. But I recognise that it does and that some words end up being seen as offensive whereas once they weren't. That's life. Adapt.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Winning the olympics, is overrated, especially in tennis, soccer etc, the 4 slams are every tennis players dream of playing and winning,

A very good point. Olympic tennis is a side show and anyway, she would have got into the US team. She has had lots of reasons to elect Japanese citizenship, some of which may be financial and others personal - she was born here of a Japanese parent and has had people telling her all her career that she is not really Japanese.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

According to the Japanese law you can only have one citizenship.

There is no law in Japan that says one can only have one citizenship. You need to fact check that.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The US is far more accepting of colored people than Japan is.

I think so definitely

Imagine the life after retirement; would she really be happier in Japan than in the US?

It depends, I’m not her, but what I can say is, when you have money you can make a happy life everywhere.

Of course Japanese citizenship might be more advantageous in terms of tax rate and sponsorship money, but would she really be happy in Japan for the rest of her life?

It's not too late to reconsider and make the right choice.

I’m sure she’ll make the right choice and remember, she can always leave if she feels she’s not being treated probably or respectfully.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

bass4funk

The US is far more accepting of colored people than Japan is.

I think so definitely

The difference between "colored" in America and Japan, is that here in Japan you are unlikely to be victim of a gun homicide.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

She's free to do as she chooses, of course, and as far as choices go, she had two pretty good ones. I think she made a mistake, though. The public here will drop her like a sack of potatoes once she drops out for good (and even before then if she loses more), and she'll be back to being a "foreigner", or "hafu" at best.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

My children have dual nationality but only a Japanese passport .

Hmmm...I suspect you didn't get them both passports, but you could and should have. All it took was time and going to your embassy in Japan or wherever.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

How come if she has a Japanese mother and a Haitian father, she has US citizenship? Other than the wording is wrong, and her father is Haitian/American...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

No mention of her living in Japan.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The difference between "colored" in America and Japan, is that here in Japan you are unlikely to be victim of a gun homicide.

I have no idea as to where that comment came from, but whatever.....

My children have dual nationality but only a Japanese passport

My kids have both dual nationality and both US and. Japanese passports.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

(Capuchin)

To clarify. Japan DOES NOT allow for dual citizenship. I know that in a lot of cases people who have dual nationality accept Japanese citizenship but then don't relinquish the passports for the other country. Japan usually only sends a polite letter asking you to destroy your other passport and never follows up on it.

Apart from the fact that no such letter is sent, destroying your passport wouldn't cancel your nationality, any more than destroying your marriage certificate would cancel your marriage. It's a passport; it's not your nationality.

(The Long Termer)

She cannot however be both a Japanese citizen and American at the same time, while being legal, in Japan.

By having two nationalities, she is a dual national by definition. But that status is not in itself illegal in Japan. While in Japan, she is treated as a Japanese national, not an American national, and her legal rights are those of a Japanese, not more nor less. In America, she is legally deemed an American national rather than Japanese because she is known (for now) to hold American nationality. Whether a country does or does not recognize dual nationality works out much the same way: in the country of your nationality, you cannot produce an additional foreign nationality as a means of evading legal responsibilities or of gaining legal rights not otherwise available to you.

(JJ Jetplane)

The law doesn't require proof that dual citizens gave up their citizenship. It simply says that they have to.

Being pedantic, it doesn't even say that. This is what it does say (my bold):

"A Japanese national who has made the declaration of choice shall endeavour to deprive himself or herself of the foreign nationality."

(Klausdorth)

Once again in reference to dual citizenship in Japan. According to the Japanese law you can only have one citizenship.

Nowhere in the law does it say that, or anything equivalent to it.

http://www.moj.go.jp/ENGLISH/information/tnl-01.html

So in Naomi's case, I assume she denounced her US citizenship, or if not, she made a decision that violates Japanese laws.

You've misunderstood the process. The Nationality Law required her to make a choice (and she complied).

She had to file one of two notifications. One automatically results in the loss of Japanese nationality: 国籍離脱届 (kokuseki ridatsu todoke). The other, 国籍選択届 (kokuseki sentaku todoke) "declaration of choice of nationality", is, despite the neutral title, a declaration that the applicant chooses Japanese nationality. It contains wording about abandoning foreign nationalities which has no legal jurisdiction over those nationalities, and no effect on them. The applicant is just as much a dual national after filing a kokuseki sentaku todoke as they were before filing it. To put it in even simpler terms, when you file a declaration of choice of nationality, you walk in as a dual national, and you walk out again as a dual national. That is literally as the law has designed the process, so her decision, performed as legally required, cannot possibly "violate Japanese laws".

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Coloured and a million other racial identification words that fall into favor and disfavor as often as I buy new shoes. Why do so many of you give a darn?

For some words yes, but in the US, calling a black person 'colored' has been considered offensive for quite a few decades, so that's not one of them.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Nice summary Wipeout.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

No its not a nice summary. You cant just make up the law to suit your own purposes or feel good intentions.

You cannot be 2 different nationalities in Japan, once you reach the age of an adult.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

To put it in even simpler terms, when you file a declaration of choice of nationality, you walk in as a dual national, and you walk out again as a dual national. That is literally as the law has designed the process, so her decision, performed as legally required, cannot possibly "violate Japanese laws

LOL. Then why even have the law in the first place????

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

America is one of only two countries in the world where you have to lodge and pay taxes even is your not a resident but still a citizen. Many high earning Americans relinquish their American citizenship for precisely these reasons.

You have to file, but not necessarily pay, depends on the amount earned. I have never paid US taxes while working for Japanese, in Japan. But your point brings up another quagmire that could occur with dual nationality. Say Naomi made 1 mil this year, and was still a US citizen, and also Japanese citizen. She would have to pay both, as she is over the foreign earned exemption limit. She could not claim, "but I am a Japanese citizen, so bug off" to the IRS, and would pay huge amounts of taxes to both countries

Dual citizenship also creates problems for military service. For ex. in SG, every citizen must perform military service. If you have both US and SG nationality, now your serving in a foreign military, according to US law.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Thank you to Wipeout for posting a very thorough and correct post on this subject, saving me a lot of time of having to write out exactly what you wrote.

What what Wipeout wrote is absolutely correct and there's an awful lot of misinformation on this subject which is doing more harm than good.

As the as the article stated, Naomi is simply following the procedures necessary to ensure her legal status as a Japanese citizen (who also happens to be an citizen of the US). But in no way will she actually relinquishing her US citizenship nor will the Japanese government force her to do so.

Japanese natural born citizens are required under the Constitution to be treated equally and, asking one citizen to formally renounce their citizenship (in this case US citizenship) would force her to go through a lengthy and expensive process which would be patently unfair to her. She received both Japanese and US citizenship from birth but she should not be punished for that. So she's signing a paper essentially saying that while I am in Japan I will consider myself to be a Japanese citizen and give up the rights as an American citizen while in Japan. But that paper is very specific in the kanji that is used: hoki-suru (放棄する - relinquish /give up a claim to~) and not ridatsu (離脱 - breakaway/secession/separation), because the Japanese government cannot force someone to give up something that:

A: they have no jurisdiction over

B: something that they have had since birth

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@SumoBob

But in no way will she actually relinquishing her US citizenship nor will the Japanese government force her to do so.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/tennis-star-naomi-osaka-gives-u-s-citizenship-represent-japan-n1065111

Tennis star Naomi Osaka gives up U.S. citizenship to represent Japan at Tokyo Olympics

The dual citizen has already begun the process of renouncing her U.S. citizenship.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

What many people don't seem to know is that when you are a Japanese citizen and/or a permanent resident you are required to pay taxes on all income regardless of where you live or where you earned that income. Just because the government doesn't necessarily enforce it does not mean that it isn't a law.

The same way Americans are required to file taxes every year. There are also many that have never filed a tax return while living and working abroad.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@The Long Termer

You cant just make up the law to suit your own purposes or feel good intentions.

No, but you could try reading it. Then you have a fighting chance of understanding what the law actually says and what it doesn't.

You cannot be 2 different nationalities in Japan, once you reach the age of an adult.

As I have already described, that's exactly what happens to Japanese dual nationals who file a declaration of choice (to continue with Japanese nationality). After filing, you are still a dual national, right there in the presence of the officials.

LOL. Then why even have the law in the first place????

The law is the Nationality Law. It addresses a range of issues concerning nationality. Pretty much every country has a nationality law.

The particular section you're talking about provides a rapid mechanism for a Japanese dual national to shed their Japanese nationality, voluntarily and on the spot. If you want my own opinion on why, I'd say that by compelling dual nationals - this "coming of age category" primarily consists of Japanese people with one non-Japanese parent, so they are people of "mixed blood" - to make a choice, and by dangling immediate renunciation of Japanese nationality in front of them, it is a way of cementing into law the notion that they don't fully belong; in brief, it's discriminatory. They can still choose to remain Japanese, and I would be unsurprised if far more than 50% do so, but that's beside the point.

That section of the law is there because it makes it easy for dual nationals to lose their Japanese nationality without actually forcing them to. People who share your opinion would probably have a better understanding of this process if they realized that every aspect of making the choice (other than the requirement to file in the first place) is voluntary. Hence the weak wording and complete lack of detail on giving up the non-Japanese nationality. Because that's voluntary too. This whole section is legal sleight-of-hand, and it's not the way it is by chance or by oversight.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

@wipeout,

read what samit basu posted

The dual citizen has already begun the process of renouncing her U.S. citizenship.

As I have already described, that's exactly what happens to Japanese dual nationals who file a declaration of choice (to continue with Japanese nationality). After filing, you are still a dual national, right there in the presence of the officials.

once you renounce, you are no longer a dual national, or a citizen of the US. No matter how much twisted nonsense you post, it clearly says she has begun the process of renouncing her US citizenship, as that is required by law, otherwise why do it, if she is a dual national? If you or yours or in violation of the law, thats your biz, but dont spread misinformation in order to make yourself feel good about past decisions.

If I was a betting man, I would place a bet with anyone, that this woman,Naomi, in 10+ years would regret her decision and "miss" all that is good about the US and will admit this was a mistake to renounce.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

The same way Americans are required to file taxes every year. There are also many that have never filed a tax return while living and working abroad.

The IRS has offices in Asia and will find you, send a warning letter. Used to be one in Beijing, not sure where it is now.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

You cant just make up the law to suit your own purposes or feel good intentions.

I agree. What's weird though is that you then go on to make up a law to suit your own needs:

You cannot be 2 different nationalities in Japan, once you reach the age of an adult.

No such law exists.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/tennis-star-naomi-osaka-gives-u-s-citizenship-represent-japan-n1065111

The article makes the claim:

The tennis star, who has dual citizenship from the U.S. and Japan, revealed Thursday that she has already begun the process of renouncing her U.S. citizenship in order to do so.

But the author is under the mistaken impression this means that renouncing American citizenship is required:

Under a 1985 Japanese law, dual citizens are required to make a “declaration of choice,” renouncing one of their citizenships before their 22nd birthday, which Osaka herself will be celebrating next week.

Nothing in the article supports the title, and incorrect information is given in the article.

So whether or not she is also renouncing her American citizenship is still an unknown.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

If I was a betting man, I would place a bet with anyone, that this woman,Naomi, in 10+ years would regret her decision and "miss" all that is good about the US and will admit this was a mistake to renounce.

If I were a betting man, I'd bet she's not even giving up her citizenship.

If someone can find an actual quote by her, or her management, stating she's giving up/renouncing her American citizenship, I'll believe it. But so far all I've seen is people making incorrect assumptions based on not understanding the law in Japan, and how it works.

Wipeout's post at 10:39 on Oct 11 lays it all out, including references to the law. Such references have not been shown by anyone who is claiming that he is wrong.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I don't know if it's the same in America but the UK government can cancel a citizenship provided it does not make the person stateless. This has happened with a number of Brits who went to fight with ISS in Syria they had their citizenships cancelled if they had dual nationality.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

according to Wikipedia:

It is generally difficult to have dual citizenship of Japan and another country, due to the provisions for loss of Japanese nationality when a Japanese national naturalizes in another country (see "Loss of citizenship" above), and the requirement to renounce one's existing citizenships when naturalizing in Japan (see "Naturalization" above).

Now there is allot of gobleygook, chasing ones tail, uniquely Japan loop logic posted above that for your reference, on the wiki site, but rest assured, I will never naturalize in japan. I even took an oath before a consulate officer that I never intend to relinquish my nationality under any circumstances (yes you can do that)

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Now there is allot of gobleygook

Go figure, dealing with actual laws in the actual world, is a little difficult, and can't just be boiled down to "dual citizenship is not allowed".

I will never naturalize in japan. I even took an oath before a consulate officer that I never intend to relinquish my nationality under any circumstances (yes you can do that)

Ok. Weird that you're railing against something no one has asked you to do, or really cares about one way or the other.

But have you dropped this silly idea that there is a law in Japan disallowing dual citizenship?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

This post is about Naomi Osaka claiming her birth right and about no one else. It's her decision to make and live by.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

My kids have both dual nationality and both US and. Japanese passports.

yes and my kids could get their second passport but I havent applied for it yet as there is no need for it as they can go most anywhere on their Japanese passport. Like I said a passport isnt a certificate of citizenship although you need to be citizen first before you can apply for a passport

4 ( +4 / -0 )

@The Long Termer

once you renounce, you are no longer a dual national, or a citizen of the US.

Renouncing a non-Japanese nationality to the Japanese authorities has no effect. In the eyes of the country of that nationality, the Japanese procedure has no legal standing. There is no ambiguity whatsoever about that. It's a matter of jurisdiction, and the Japanese fully understand that as well.

As you cannot lose a foreign nationality merely by announcing it - in writing or otherwise - to the Japanese authorities, you do not thereby become "no longer a dual national" either. Dual national can simply be defined as a person who holds two nationalities. So if you hold a foreign nationality in addition to Japanese nationality, you are a dual national no matter what is stated in the kokuseki sentaku todoke (国籍選択届) that has been filed. It is only by taking additional steps with the authorities of the country of the foreign nationality that the dual national would shed that nationality. If they opt not to take any action, they remain a dual national.

read what samit basu posted

(i.e. "The dual citizen has already begun the process of renouncing her U.S. citizenship.")

All that tells me is that Osaka has (more accurately, may have, assuming the news story referred to isn't yet example of garbling this issue) opted to rid herself of US nationality, something that she can only do by filing whatever needs to be filed with the US authorities. Every dual national (with some rare exceptions) has the right to offload one of their nationalities. So what?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Wow! A lot of huffing and puffing over two pieces of paper. Yes, as a dual national child born in Japan, you can hang onto both passports at the age 22 and you will technically keep your dual nationality. HOWEVER, in practical terms good luck working that to your advantage because the "INTENT" of the Japanese rules are as clear as the government fingerprinting tourists (its out of love).

The nationality of your RESIDENCE will always take precedence so there really aren't that many practical advantages especially if you get into legal trouble. The US State department spells it out: "Dual nationality may hamper efforts of the U.S. Government to provide consular protection to them when they are abroad, especially when they are in the country of their second nationality." Of course, that applies to every other country.

If you are a dual national Japanese / American and are kidnapped by the Taliban, good luck trying to argue both nations should pay the ransom or attempt a rescue. Japan can easily decline because they weren't informed of the kidnapped victim's US citizenship. Arbitrary? As someone argued before the British government voided a British ISIS bride's citizenship since she had another nationality to fall back on...and they simply didn't want her back. More common are incidences where Japanese mothers have faced divorce in another country so they flee back to Japan with their dual national kids. The French husband can argue his children are French nationals and that a French court ruled the wife has lost custody in absentia...but that won't cut any mustard in Japan. He will have to wait until they are adults to visit them.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

In 2019 does it really matter? She’s sold herself to the highest bidder. I don’t really think she cares either way. A little inconvenience here a little inconvenience there. The J government is forcing her to decide. It’s practical now. Is her renunciation official for the Olympics or is she really hiding her dual citizenship as many others do?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

There is some confusion about what Japanese law actually says. The article is also wrong when it states:

Osaka, who has a Japanese mother and a Haitian father, told NHK she has completed an administrative step to obtain Japanese citizenship ahead of her birthday next week.

Osaka has had Japanese nationality since birth and therefore does not need to take any "administrative steps" to obtain it.

Japanese law stipulates that a Japanese with more than one nationality must chose one before turning 22 years old.

It is said that the choice should be made before you reach 22, but in fact the authorities are obliged to accept the declaration of nationality whenever it is submitted.

Furthermore, if a person chooses to keep their Japanese nationality that is the end of the matter. They can keep any other nationalities they may have and there is nothing the Japanese authorities can do about it. Loss of Japanese nationality is not possible under the law. Note that this only applies to people who have been Japanese since birth. The law is quite different for a person who becomes Japanese through naturalisation.

This is all explained in detail here: http://www.yoshabunko.com/nationality/Dual_nationality.html

5 ( +5 / -0 )

As someone argued before the British government voided a British ISIS bride's citizenship since she had another nationality to fall back on...and they simply didn't want her back. 

Bangladesh has publicly stated that Shamima Begum is not a citizen, expressed by the Foreign Ministry as follows: "She is a British citizen by birth and has never applied for dual nationality with Bangladesh." They have further stated that she would not be permitted to enter their country. The British government's action is under legal challenge, and may not have been legal if it does in fact constitute rendering Begum stateless. The Bangladesh government interpretation is that she is not a dual citizen at all. The British government interpretation is that she is either a national of Bangladesh by default or is eligible to apply for nationality. A legal ruling on statelessness is likely to hinge on whether or not she is a national of Bangladesh by default.

She's probably not the best example of the drawbacks of dual nationality.

More common are incidences where Japanese mothers have faced divorce in another country so they flee back to Japan with their dual national kids. The French husband can argue his children are French nationals and that a French court ruled the wife has lost custody in absentia...but that won't cut any mustard in Japan.

Japan's actions in this regard are not based on an interpretation that the child's foreign nationality is invalid. Japan actually recognizes, and in no way attempts to forbid or suggest it is illegal, that many children acquire another nationality at birth or during childhood (this is mentioned in the Nationality Law and it specifies acquisition of foreign nationality up to twenty years of age).

0 ( +0 / -0 )

As someone argued before the British government voided a British ISIS bride's citizenship since she had another nationality to fall back on...and they simply didn't want her back. 

Actually I didn't say that. I said the British government have the power to remove citizenship unless it would make the person stateless. I think Canada too has the same power.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Back on topic please.

It seems obvious that her decision was a monetary one (sponsorships) . As a famous athlete, she is/was in a position to put Japan's outdated immigration law under a microscope by insisting on legally keeping both nationalities. A missed opportunity for modernizing this country.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Maybe there is a tax angle in Osaka's decision. US guys at the office are always complaining about the hoops they have to jump through to pay US taxes, which are sometimes heavy. But personally, I think she is sincere and just wants to be Japanese. Welcome!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

If you pay America taxes you don't have to pay Japanese ones. If you pay Japanese taxes you don't need to pay American ones. I submitted a form to the American tax office. No dual taxation.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Wow, 'colored people'. I'm not usually part of the PC police, but the last time I heard someone say 'colored people', it was an old white woman that didn't realize calling a black man a 'colored fella' was kinda racist...

There's quite a number of players who want to play in the Olympics and their national teams don't accept them so they get say Russian citizenship so they can even play in the Games at all. But since Naomi already is Japanese what difference does it make here?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@ zichi, You don't pay any taxes as long as your income is under the basic deduction, which now is 90,000 dollars. The US guys make rather more than that, so even after the deductions (like Japanese taxes), they are still stuck with several thousands of dollars in US taxes. Naomi Osaka will have to pay Japanese taxes even if her income is made abroad, but it still may be a better deal.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I saw 118 comments,but for the life of me couldn't see the traction for them.Haven't looked at any either.Japan's been bankrolling her and Naomi seemingly has to choose her nationality.Probably will keep her U.S. nationality discreetly,so where's the ongoing discussion?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

It seems obvious that her decision was a monetary one (sponsorships) . 

Really? That doesn’t seem obvious to me. Can you explain this theory more?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Maybe, Strangerland, since you are the absolute expert on Japanese immigration law, you could join the legal team of this group:

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2018/03/12/national/crime-legal/lawsuit-challenges-japans-ban-dual-citizenship/

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Maybe, Strangerland, since you are the absolute expert on Japanese immigration law

I’m the one eyed man in the kingdom of the blind on this one. I’m most definitely not an expert, but clearly know more specifics than many in this thread.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I guess renouncing her US or whatever citizenship helps keep a medal in Japan and not have to share it, regardless what Osaka’s background is. It’s about medals. Who cares about her loyalty.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I guess renouncing her US or whatever citizenship helps keep a medal in Japan and not have to share it

No one has managed to post anything at all to show she is giving up her American citizenship.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The US is far more accepting of colored people than Japan is.

I have no issue with the term. What is the difference between colored people, and people of color?

I guess since Im considered white, Im a color - less person

Im already feeling left out.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

What is the difference between colored people, and people of color?

Why don’t you go ask a black person. Believe it or not there is a reason. Something along the lines of water fountains being denied to “coloreds”.

But hey, if you don’t mind using terms that have historically been used as terms of discrimination and racism, and don’t mind insulting to people who are offended by being referred to using a term that historically been used as a means of oppression against their people, then who are we to point out your insensitivity. It’s your choice if you want to make people feel bad and don’t mind looking like racists. I mean, I personally prefer to treat people with dignity and respect, but everyone has the right to be full of hate and treat people with disrespect.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

It reminds me of a black friend talking about white people who have asked him why it’s ok for black people to use the N word and not white people. His response “if you really want to, go ahead. I don’t understand why you’d want to though, and I won’t associate with you after you do.”

2 ( +2 / -0 )

http://www.moj.go.jp/ENGLISH/information/tcon-01.html

Info above on process, which isn’t generally enforced. Still, as someone mentioned, with a high profile person, things might be different.

Colored people refers to black people, and is currently considered racist, though it was not always that way, which we see with the NAACP.

Person of color is a term used on TV/radio, and is not currently considered racist (well, by most). It includes all folks who don’t identify as white. Many people express pride in being a person of color.

Alien includes green beings among others, and, while not necessarily racist, does not sound inclusive, Still, being an alien can be fun.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Person of color is a term used on TV/radio, and is not currently considered racist (well, by most). It includes all folks who don’t identify as white. Many people express pride in being a person of color.

person of color, was meant to alienate white people, like "I am a person of color, and you dont have any color, therefore I am superior"

Its typical left wing logic; trying to cure a real and legitimate problem with something worse.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

OK, so if she's choosing Japanese citizenship over American citizenship, then she's renouncing her American citizenship, right? Whilst every year thousands of people from all over the world endeavor to become U.S. citizens. Perhaps she does not truly understand what she is giving up.

She had better learn how to speak Japanese.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Japan has many great things about it, but I would not want to become a citizen, mostly because I would never be accepted as one.

The treatment I get everyday...Im used to it now, but also I know there is an escape if it gets to be too much.

That escape kind of gives me a silent confidence, and its priceless.

I have heard some who have naturalized say "it will get better if you naturalize"

I guess thats one of the most insane things I have ever heard, actually its quite sad.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Naomi Osaka was already Japanese-American and why taking this step she will remain Japanese-American. She just did the formality for her future.

She's choosing to remain both. She's not giving anything up including her American citizen.

But while in Japan she will be treated has a Japanese citizen under law and America cannot offer anything.

When in America she will be treated has an American citizen.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Using the term "colored" is both insulting and disrespecting.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

The only choice. Who would want to be an American

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The only choice. Who would want to be an American

Thousands of people.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@TheLongTermer

I have no issue with the term. What is the difference between colored people, and people of color?

Of course you don't have a problem with the term. You would have been allowed to enter all the places that had signs outside that said 'no colored people'.

Now, let me get this straight. You don't have a problem with the term 'colored people', but you do have a problem with the term 'people of color' because you feel it excludes you as a white person? Make up your mind.

Come on man, learn your history. It has nothing to do with the left or the right. 'Colored' is a reminder of the times when blacks were considered less of a person and it has absolutely nothing do with you 'feeling left out'.

Japan has many great things about it, but I would not want to become a citizen, mostly because I would never be accepted as one.

The treatment I get everyday...Im used to it now, but also I know there is an escape if it gets to be too much.

That escape kind of gives me a silent confidence, and its priceless.

I have heard some who have naturalized say "it will get better if you naturalize"

I guess thats one of the most insane things I have ever heard, actually its quite sad.

After all that, you still refuse to understand why black people might no like to be reminded of the times that they were referred to as 'colored'...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

person of color, was meant to alienate white people, like "I am a person of color, and you dont have any color, therefore I am superior”

Wow, talk about a persecution complex! They create a term to describe themselves, but to the white person it’s all about them.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

OK, so if she's choosing Japanese citizenship over American citizenship, then she's renouncing her American citizenship, right?

There has been nothing to indicate she is doing so.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

A good business decision for her overall.

In japan she would go down History as the 1st ever for ever now in Sports, not just tennis, 1st NO 1, 1st GRAND-SLAM winner, so many sponsors want her, while in USA she would be another Tennis champion of the 100s.

While its good for her if she likes Japan, which is a nice country, but Japanese are so against foreigners, the only reason they like her is because she brings GLORY to Japan, do Japanese care about foreigners or actual mixed race living here, no & never will.Japanese young generation is more IGNORANT than the old ones, who are actually nicer.

Naomi fame is more sponsor driven, who are hungry for INTERNATIONAL EXPOSURE AND MARKETS.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Japanese are so against foreigners

People make this claim all the time. I’ve lived in a few countries, and in the past few years I’ve been doing business in a few others. I don’t find Japan to be particular unwelcome to foreigners overall, and the immigration system is a lot easier to deal with than the other countries I’ve had to deal with visas in.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Actually to all those who think otherwise Japanese law is very clear you can't really have dual nationality, it even says in English on the ministry of justice website

http://www.moj.go.jp/ENGLISH/information/tcon-01.html

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

The only disappointment for me is, Naomi Osaka was the only person to start a discussion about this unnecessary archaic law in the mass-media, and create a pressure on japanese government to change the law or at least start a movement, she did none of them for the future of dual-citizenship holders and accept in total obedience silently.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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