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S Korean soccer player barred from medal ceremony over political message

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Korean nationalism is over the edge. That they even talk about Japanese Nationalism is a joke.

27 ( +33 / -6 )

They have a lot of steam and Japan not.

-9 ( +5 / -14 )

Wow Typical Korean mentality! Read the print before posting

16 ( +19 / -3 )

I support the idea of everyone leaving politics at home for the Olympics, and working together for the sporting ideal.

An alternate view might be for everyone to incite political opponents as much as possible, and to have riots in the evenings....which could be televised. Sponsor could pay for branded signs...hmmmm.

12 ( +12 / -0 )

Geez why doesn't this surprise me? Predictable and petty.

21 ( +20 / -0 )

He could care less.

-He won a medal in the olympics.

-Hes exempt from military service.

-He gained several new fans.

-He made a boat ton of money.

-He helped South Korea crush their football rival.

-He pissed off Japan to the point that they felt the need to file a complaint.

-By the time the 2016 Olympics rolls out, he will be over the age of 23 and unable to play regardless.

He should totally upload a video of himself visiting Dokdo for even more laughs. I know I will.

-27 ( +5 / -32 )

Yes, Japan lost ok, great for South Korea, but this guy is stupid for displaying his personal political views at the London Olympics, and anyway MEXICO got the GOLD!!

22 ( +27 / -6 )

http://view.koreaherald.com/kh/view.php?ud=20120812000011

Footballer misses medal ceremony as officials investigate political act

"accidentally ran around with the sign in the heat of the moment" during post-match celebrations.

"We understand this wasn't an intentional act on the player's part," the KOC said. "We are trying the best we can to resolve >this issue."

How pathetic is this. He didn't "miss" the ceremony. And it was no accident.

17 ( +18 / -1 )

"We understand this wasn't an intentional act on the player's part" Are they kidding? Seriously...

13 ( +13 / -0 )

This guy didn't plan things out very well. He should have kept that sign in his back pocket and not pulled it out UNTIL the awards ceremony, like those "black power" dudes back in the day.

-9 ( +4 / -13 )

This is another reason why I never watch the Olympics anymore. The "Olympic spirit" just doesnt exist, its been destroyed by this kind of nationalism, polititics and professionalism.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

Oldsanno,

Great link! I guess, in the future, we can look forward to spectators accidently dropping various signs onto the field for the athletes to accidently run around with.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Okay then. Maybe it's time for Japan to stop being so passive, and stand up to these bullies? Quit being so passive! Just a thought.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Well, it's really sad, but predictable. Nationalism is strong also in Japan, for sure, but I have the feeling in Korea it's stronger. I was really surprised by the title of this article: http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/sports/2012/08/136_116938.html I think I never read titles like that in Japanese press.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

in 1945 from 35 years of Japanese colonial rule.

Expression called the colonial rule of this report is not right. The annexation of Korea by Japan is right. Because, citizenship was granted to them.

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

I was hoping we would get through these Olympics without this sort of idiocy, but I guess not.

He should totally upload a video of himself visiting Dokdo for even more laughs.

Oh, did he "accidentally" hold up the sign as a joke?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

vg866,

-The Olympic spirit and sportsmanship are ideas that are too big for him.

-Korea's reputation and honor have been damaged in international eyes, and he doesn't care.

-He'll wind up as a national disgrace, but he'll get to watch that video forever.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

This doesn't hurt South Koreas reputation one bit. Its one guy acting on his own volition in a sporting event.

-15 ( +1 / -16 )

The Koreans should be happy with their bronze medal, and that the Chinese are not trying to push them into the sea as was the case when the Chinese and Russians back North Korea invaded South Korea and blah, blah, blah...this is why POLITICS HAS NO PLACE IN THE OLYMPICS!! Baka na wakai kankoku no senshu da ne!

0 ( +5 / -5 )

What a putz. I hope he not only loses the medal, but also any remuneration and corporate sponsorship.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

@Naoki Saitou: colonial rule is right. Don't start with this kind of stuff, please.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Stay on topic please.

South Korea give me the impression not so much that they wanted to win as they just couldn't bear the fact of losing.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

I hope he not only loses the medal, but also any remuneration and corporate sponsorship.

Wishful thinking I'm afraid. If anything, he'll be welcomed home to huge acclaim for his "heroic" deed.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Virtuoso

Wishful thinking I'm afraid. If anything, he'll be welcomed home to huge acclaim for his "heroic" deed.

The football player wins in the end. He gets everything- medal, draft exemption, recognition, a sweet victory, money and the ability to mock Japan with next to no repercussions.

The only thing he loses is standing on the podium which isn't really that big of deal if you think about it. He already won the game and the medal.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

He got the banner from one of the (Korean) spectators, but this is imperceptible .

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@vg866: He lost the most important thing, to me: the Olympic spirit.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

They just couldn't help themselves....Korean nationalism is full on..

5 ( +6 / -1 )

The only thing he loses is standing on the podium which isn't really that big of deal if you think about it. He already won the game and the medal.

His face on the photographs with THE TEAM on the podium will be missing forever, some would think that this brings great shame on him AND the team too.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

His actions are just normal for Koreans.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liancourt_Rocks

South Korea, for its part, maintains a nationwide educational program which sends students from 62 elementary, middle, and high schools on field trips to the rocks on a regular basis. The government has also written a textbook about the rocks, intended to be used in elementary schools across the country, and manages a year-round national educational tour. When Japan's Shimane prefecture announced a "Takeshima Day" in 2005, Koreans reacted with demonstrations and protests throughout the country, extreme examples of which included a mother and son slicing off their own fingers, and a man who set himself on fire. In 2006, five Korean "Dokdo Riders" embarked on a world tour to raise international awareness of the dispute. Other notable protests featured South Koreans decapitating pheasants in front of the Japanese Embassy, and a South Korean association football player holding up a sign stating "Dokdo is our land", after the bronze medal match with Japan duing the 2012 Summer Olympics.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

This is Just like the 1968 Olympics in Mexico, when Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their black gloved fists in the air in a silent gesture and human rights solute. I was not even one year old at the time but it is something I've seen over and over. This players protest is no different.

-8 ( +1 / -9 )

I meant salute

0 ( +1 / -1 )

A great decision. The Olympics do not need to return to the days of the Cold War when the judges made decisions based on political dogma and country of origin. Doping is more important than his senseless, political statement.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I don't see the big deal. I thought the olympics was about national pride. Good for him he just wanted to make a patriotic statement..

-12 ( +3 / -15 )

accidentally ran around with the sign in the heat of the moment" during post-match celebrations.

So can we assume then that the player is illiterate then?

I mean if it was an accident then there is no way he would have known what was written on the sign. Cripes how dense do they think the world is?

6 ( +7 / -1 )

This really reminds me again that over last WBC Korean baseball payers put a little flag on the ground after Korea defeated Japan. How stupid he is!

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Do you get the feeling that these rocks are a bigger deal in South Korea than in Japan?

6 ( +8 / -2 )

This guy didn't plan things out very well. He should have kept that sign in his back pocket and not pulled it out UNTIL the awards ceremony, like those "black power" dudes back in the day.

Exactly! I bet the IOC didn't take their medals away from them.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

What is disgusting is the SK media is making this guy a victim. That is extremly wrong. Although I am not surprised.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

He is a "hero" in South Korea now.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

This guy didn't plan things out very well. He should have kept that sign in his back pocket and not pulled it out UNTIL the awards ceremony, like those "black power" dudes back in the day.

Exactly! I bet the IOC didn't take their medals away from them.

As long as Olympics is going on until 12th, this kind of political action is still against the rule of Olympic spirit. But no problem after it is ended.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

This is Just like the 1968 Olympics in Mexico, when Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their black gloved fists in the air in a silent gesture and human rights solute. I was not even one year old at the time but it is something I've seen over and over. This players protest is no different.

Utrack for someone who was alive during Mexico '68 it's a shame you think the black glove salute is the same. Tommie Smith and John Carlos were protesting racism in the united states, not petty territorial disputes for personal gain. Those two men knew that their actions would not be appreciated by white america. Parks gesture was selfish and knew it would stoke the egos of Korean politicians.

9 ( +13 / -4 )

According to the Korean Olympic Committee : " Park picked up a sign that had been thrown in from the stands and "accidentally ran around with the sign in the heat of the moment" during post-match celebrations."

1 ( +2 / -1 )

He is a "hero" in South Korea now.

but the rest of world he seems to be a "idiot".

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Those Koreans are always trying to stir things up. Laughable moment.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Just the way they get educated. It is a national effort, to the worse effect.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

he got his reward, an adulation from Korea. No hard feelings...then he started saying he just pick the poster tossed by an audience...Common, you did it on purpose be a man and own up your action but I guess that's why he does not want to train in the military.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

it's not gonna matter to him cuz he beat japan. he will get this military exemption. how much did japan pay to the IOC for this ruckus?

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

The Olympics are about bringing the world together. This kind of behavior spits in the face of that so its right that he didnt receive a medal. I hope he gets a lot of "hey can i see your medal? Oh right you dont have one"... Leave the politics at home and just play the game.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

that korean guyAug. 12, 2012 - 11:21AM JST

it's not gonna matter to him cuz he beat japan. he will get this military exemption. how much did japan pay to the IOC for this ruckus?

The IOC has a long standing stance against bringing politics into gameplay. If the guy had waited until after the ceremony, and said it in front of press but not in relation to the olymics, there wouldn't be much of an issue.

This guy's actions are entirely unjustified, and his teammates are just as guilty for not even reprimanding him. They should have been entirely barred from the podium as a team, in order to prevent future occurrences of this. They would still get their medal, but also receive sufficient punishment to deter most future outbreaks.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

paulinusaAug. 12, 2012 - 10:59AM JST

According to the Korean Olympic Committee : " Park picked up a sign that had been thrown in from the stands and "accidentally ran around with the sign in the heat of the moment" during post-match celebrations."

That stadium has in excess of a dozen HD video cameras and likely hundreds of security cameras. If that is the case, it will be known shortly, but unless the committee is trying to say their players are incompetent at reading, it wouldn't be an excuse regardless.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

sport are suppose to bring nations together not to divide them, that was a sport event which started relation between china and America and stopped a possible war, even in the recent era Pakistan and India the two rivals are trying to come close through sports

4 ( +4 / -0 )

they won this game but still have the gutss to INSULT us!!!!! LOL its like Japan - lost, insulted----- S.korea - won,insulter

1 ( +3 / -2 )

it's not gonna matter to him cuz he beat japan. he will get this military exemption.

I don't know much about military service. It seems that Korean men are playing games very much for any metals to avoid hateful military training service, so change the law, then would be less metals.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The only thing worse than Japanese nationalism is Korean nationalism!

1 ( +5 / -4 )

korean have such an inferiority complex that they feel the need to do things like this. i guess it make sense seeing as they've been conquered by all their neighbors at one time or another but have not been able to do the same. the IOC should have made the whole team pay, after this is a team sport.

5 ( +10 / -4 )

The man is either a damn fool or a political pawn. Either way his football career is over. Get FIFA riled and you are done for.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Good.... Keep politics out of sports.... And outh Korea is low; as low as china. Even had their bad mitten team thrown out for unsportsman like behavior.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

is nationalism means hating another nation??? it just looks like that here , this guy may become the Ashihara of Korea, he is on the way to become the Governor of soul

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Hope behaving like an *** was worth loosing an Olympic medal.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Imagine the outrage and sense of victimization all across Korea if a Japanese player had displayed such a sign.

3 ( +5 / -3 )

Dokdo is a Korean territory. The following are some excerpts from various researches from elite universities includding Standford.

With the beginning of the Meiji Restoration in 1868, the Japanese government began compiling land registers and bthe Meiji government made it clear in 1877 that Ulleung Island and Dokdo were Korean territory, saying they had nothing to do with Japan.

Hosaka, a Japanese-born academic, says he bought the book from a dealer who specializes in old Japanese maps. He has also found other complete maps of Japan that do not include Dokdo.

Japan’s claims of sovereignty on Dokdo are closely related to its attempt to justify its early imperialist expansion in 1905. Thus, Japan’s claiming of Dokdo was a part of its imperial-colonial expansionism design which made Korea the first victim of Japan. In the furtherance of this attitude, the Japanese extreme rightists glamorize the past imperialist appetite and colonial occupation, invasion, and bringing aggressive war and various war crimes.

Along with the Yasukuni Shrine issue and the controversy over Japan’s distortion of historical facts in middle and high school student textbooks, this sovereignty controversy about Dokdo, backed by national sentiment, has been functioning as one of the most serious barriers to better relations between Korea and Japan.

There are historical evidences that Korean title to Dokdo dates back to the Sixth century.

Yuji Hosaka, Japanese professor, states that another couple of historic Japanese maps have been discovered that do not include Korea’s Dokdo islets as part of Japanese territory.

Measuring 115 cm by 123 cm, one map was produced by the Japanese Army in 1877 and depicts the country’s sovereign territory in detail, but does not contain Dokdo. In 1889, Japanese surveyors created the country’s first-ever map on a 200,000:1 scale compiled from all of the maps that had been produced until that time, but even that makes no reference to Dokdo, Hosaka said.

Japan should stop making distorted and false claims on many historical events and data.

How would you feel if Korea started to claim that Honshu is a Korean island and start publishing textbooks and make stories as it is true.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

He's right about it being South Korean territory, and it's got to sting coming off the South Korean win, but it's poor sportsmanship all the same, and it's right he's barred.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

I say bring back "streaking".

Much, much more amusing...

6 ( +6 / -0 )

To all readers. I apologize for being an ill-mannered jerk.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

ExportExpert: "Time japan stood up and took these island by force and then stand tall with arms folded across its chest beligerently, korean can and will do nothing about it as america will hold it in place, like the older kid breaking up a school yard fight."

Japan couldn't take it's own pensioners by force if it tried, and the US would never back up anything so silly and stupid. They would stand back and say it's a domestic issue, unless it resulted in full out war. On the other hand, South Korea is by far more highly trained and would cut any Japanese forces to shred before the old men got even close to the islands. No, if there's anyone who can do nothing about this, it's Japan. And clearly though the sign is in Korean everyone has gotten the message, no? else the guy would not be barred from the medal ceremony and people like you wouldn't be shaking your fists and making claims Japan could do what it never could, and never will, be able to.

-2 ( +3 / -6 )

Weasel: "Hope behaving like an *** was worth loosing an Olympic medal."

He doesn't lose the medal, just the chance to show it off to the world.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

He will probably be the center of attraction when his team returns to Korea, and will get the highest national honor, including a gold medal from South Korea. He might even be considered a living national hero. On the other hand, he probably secured a permanent persona nongrata status in Japan and possibly will never be issued a visa. My 2 cents worth of speculation. And do not tilt the scales.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

This is a problem for government officials and diplomats. I think athletes do their sport a disservice by politicizing what are supposed to be athletic games that transcend nationalistic squabbles and discord. That said, is there something particularly strategic about these islands? I've seen pictures of them--they're literally dinky rocks sticking out of the water. I actually feel bad for the police officers who got stuck with the assignment of "guarding" the islands.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

davees9526 - I don't know what you did, but apology accepted.

Funny how almost every International sporting event involving Japan, Korea and China (not involving women) makes them all look like a bunch of spoiled children with respective politicians acting as the no-life soccer moms fueling the bad behavior.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

avigator: "He will probably be the center of attraction when his team returns to Korea, and will get the highest national honor, including a gold medal from South Korea."

Center of attraction, perhaps. Getting a gold medal from Korea? how do you figure? This was a bronze medal match.

"He might even be considered a living national hero. On the other hand, he probably secured a permanent persona nongrata status in Japan and possibly will never be issued a visa."

Don't need a visa to travel to Japan. If Japan barred him from entering based on the sign he displayed that would be illegal. Don't know why he'd want to come here anyway.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

he probably secured a permanent persona nongrata status in Japan and possibly will never be issued a visa.

He would be issued a visa. Japan is not such a country like China. Whatever he did during Olympics. he just broke the rule of Olympic spirit. He did not commit a crime so he is not a criminal. But he would be watched all the time while staying in Japan.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

This is not the first time we've seen exhibition of political fervor at the Olympics. There was the Black Power salute at the 1968 Olympics, just to name one. But I think this is the first time an athlete has been barred from medal ceremony for his/her political indiscretion. Don't you think the IOC is being very hypocritical in its stand on this latest incident since it was this very committee which refused to honor the Israeli athletes who were massacred in Munich? If this refusal/dishonor isn't a political statement, I don't know what is.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

ExportExpert: "smithjapan how hard do you think it would be for japan to send a couple of warships with equipment (helicopters, hover craft, high speed boats etc) for landing on these island and take them, could be done before your eggs are ready one morning, korea would have no time to respond and then if they later tried do you think merica would let japan and korea go to war against each other?"

How hard do you think it would be for South Korea to detect warships leaving Japan? You seem to think the South Koreans are blind while they would detect it before Gemba could pretend to try to understand what was happening. You also forget that the US needs the South Korean bases just as much if not more than the bases in Japan, and work much better with South Korea than they do with the whiners in Okinawa who depend on them but chide them every chance they get. Japan wouldn't even get close to the islands before South Korea's superior forces turned them back, and all Japan would do is say, "It's vewy vewy regrettable". But before all that, you have to take into account the fact that Japan would never, ever, have the balls to do such a thing. They'd beg the US's permission first, after forming panels and discussing it, then forming new forces to vote on it, then bring it to government which the opposition parties would demand an election first before agreeing, then the next PM (how many have changed since Lee took power in SK?) would be against it until his approval rating slipped.

Dude. As with Japan, you lost this battle. The guy holding the sign was way out of line, but his message was correct, and it must have hurt pretty bad for you to get all uptight.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

smithinjapan

This may have been news after your post...

"IOC officials have recommended that a South Korean soccer player will be barred from collecting his bronze medal after he celebrated his team's victory over Japan by holding a sign that addressed an ongoing, hot-button political flap in the region."

http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/olympics-fourth-place-medal/ioc-says-south-korean-player-t-accept-bronze-145955541--oly.html

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Dokdo is a Korean territory. The following are some excerpts from various researches from elite universities includding Standford..................etc.

Let's take this case to the international court, then better make sure that the island belongs to Korea so that Japan would never bitch about it.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Weasel: Didn't see that, thanks. I don't think the message is worth losing a medal, though barring him from the ceremony is definitely just. The IOC cannot tolerate such messages in their games, but I don't think they can dictate politics either -- that shows a power that should not be held.

kwatt: "Let's take this case to the international court, then better make sure that the island belongs to Korea so that Japan would never bitch about it."

When Japan is willing to take the Senkaku island issue to the ICJ, then SK and Japan should do likewise. Since Japan says they are unwilling to take the former to the ICJ because it's "their territory unquestionably", why should SK take it to the ICJ when they say the same? The Japanese claim smacks of lack of confidence, and they know it. SK owns and maintains the islands, and lives on them. There is no question, and no need to go to the ICJ.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

If such an incident were on Japanese players, he would give up the metal because of disgrace for the world from all points such as honesty, politeness, decency, etc of sportsmanship. It seems that Korea has a different mind culture of it.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Ktwatt

Do you have any links to prove your point or is it just speculation?

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

kwatt: "If such an incident were on Japanese players, he would give up the metal because of disgrace for the world from all points such as honesty, politeness, decency, etc of sportsmanship. It seems that Korea has a different mind culture of it."

Proof, please. Your politicians sure seem to be incapable of providing it.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I live in South Korea and nationalism here is far beyond anything I experienced while living in Japan, and makes it one of the worst aspects of living and working here. Ignoring the fact that I despise soccer despite coming from the UK, I can't count up how many thought it was important to tell me SK beat GB in the soccer. Thankfully all conversations were brought to a sudden halt when i (innocently?) asked about women's badminton. And surprisingly little coverage here of the bronze medal loss to Japan in the women's volleyball.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

He should be the only who has to serve in the military since he's such an advocate. This should be embarrassing to any country when an athletes take politics to the Olympic stage (see John Carlos and Tommie Smith, Summer games 1968). No matter what the cause. Disclaimer: I raised my fist and "said it loud".

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Some of you are painting Koreans as "nationalistic", but when an American does anything like this it would be described as "patriotic"?!! C'mon!

Anyhow, let me give you a little perspective of how MOST Koreans think of this issue as someone who is living in Seoul. All of my Korean friends think this guy was really stupid because:

A. The Olympics do not allow political statements. B. Dokdo is already Korean territory. Why keep making an issue of it as if it's contested?

I agree with the above and looking at a similar comment posted on Chosun.com there are 114 in favor and 90 against. So the majority of Koreans are NOT blindly nationalistic as some of you think.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Political issues are nothing new for the Olympics. Remember many Olympics ago when U.S. black competitors raised their fists in a black power salute while on the victory stand.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Please, don't make that air-head a martyr. Should have got a slap on the wrist... but should have been at his ceremony, and apologizing foe breaking the rules. That's not the IOC's role to tell what is political.

The IOC had begun an investigation into Park’s actions,

What do they think they can they find ? They are really over-reacting.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

My suggestion is that Park apologizes to the IOC/FIFA and gets his medal. He's just a dumb kid who got caught up in the moment and held up a lame Dokdo poster given to him by a dumbass football fan. It was not planned.

While they're at it, the IOC and FIFA should ban BOTH "Dokdo" posters and "Rising Sun" flags (kyokujitsu-ki) at the Olympics and World Cup events.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Apologize for what? Why should he return his medal?

The island does belong to Korea and the banner he was waving was in no way racist or derogatory.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

This has to do with the Olympic Committee and FIFA not a pile of rocks in who cares where" not Takeshima, not the Senkaku not La Isla de Perejil but with two world wide non-political organizations that have been embarrassed by Korea's poor behavior toward The Committee, FIFA and lastly Japan. If all of Korea supports this thug the Korea should be banned from the next Olympics & any participation in FIFA for the next five years. Then maybe they will learn how to behave in the international arena.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Feihu: "The Committee, FIFA and lastly Japan. If all of Korea supports this thug the Korea should be banned from the next Olympics & any participation in FIFA for the next five years."

Hahaha... You obviously haven't been to many football games in Europe. No, there is nothing they should do about this but suggest what he did was wrong. FIFA and the IOC are not political bodies, and if they did something like you suggest it would end up with no countries being able to participate in anything at all. What... an American like Tyler Hamilton can dope it up for eight years but the entire American Olympic contingent shouldn't be barred, but one Korean holds up a political sign and you think all of Korea should be banned for five years?

Utter nonsense. The guy is being barred from the medal ceremony, and that is punishment enough.

0 ( +2 / -3 )

Francois5: "What is disgusting is the SK media is making this guy a victim. That is extremly wrong. Although I am not surprised."

hahaha... like the Japanese media never does the same thing. They are already the victim in just about everything you can point a finger at. They colonized much of Asia? "Wasn't me! I'm the victim!"

0 ( +0 / -0 )

So help me out here - I don't think he is getting a medal now, so I believe he is going to have to do military service, right?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

If this guy is such a nationalist/patriot - I'm sure he probably wants to do military service and be stationed on "Tokuto" anyway.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

shame on the korean player. he should be banned from the olympic in 4 yrs time. and pay a heavy fine. for those who thinks his action is great.. well this is olympic and not political game.. well i hope this guy left london and was send back to South korea..

0 ( +2 / -2 )

1, http://static.news.zum.com/images/9/2012/07/11/NISI20120711_0006648080_web.jpg 2, http://s1-05.twitpicproxy.com/photos/full/635394351.jpg 3, http://photo.sankei.jp.msn.com/~/media/essay/2012/08/0811korea/20120811korea_3.jpg 4, http://imgnews.naver.net/image/076/2012/08/11/2012081101001082800088961.jpg

Both are putting a small chest barge which shows a member of the Korean Association of Athletes or something. Is that a coincidence? Are they giving the political message to the soccer player? Oh... Organized crime...

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@ hoserfella

Utrack for someone who was alive during Mexico '68 it's a shame you think the black glove salute is the same. Tommie Smith and John Carlos were protesting racism in the united states, not petty territorial disputes for personal gain. Those two men knew that their actions would not be appreciated by white america. Parks gesture was selfish and knew it would stoke the egos of Korean politicians.

Hoserfella, this is because you are not looking at the big picture here. Both incidents stem from unfairness and inequality. If you could step back and look at Korea's history with Japan and African American history with the US, yes the later lasted over 500 years I know. But everyone wants equal rights, truth and fairness. Not oh this is the land we conquered but even though we lost the war, we still want some of it crap.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

So ridiculous.... To revok a medal because the Japanese complained... The Japanese have always belittled S. Korea through out history... If they are upset over that sign then Japan should not have waved the Rising Sun flag from WWII. To the south Koreans that flag is just like the German's Swaztika flag from WWII...

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

@smithinjapan - the point is that ROK athletes exhibit this type of behavior far more than anyone else the boxing, the fencing, and now this maybe the other things were somewhat justified but bad luck has happened to many countries in these nd other games and they don't go off like these people do and they do it because everyone treats them differently when they do. They know they can get away with it. What other nation has exhibited such a lack of sportsmanship so many times over? There is no excuse ... what because they are Koreans? That does not fly. They are 50 million people just like the rest of us we all eat, sleep, bleed and defecate the same way. Why are people continually making excuses for these people? The the Argentine team hold up signs about the Falklands, did the Spanish about Gibraltar, did the Moroccans about the disputed islands in the Mediterranean? No. But the world is going to give a pass to the Koreans. That is what is utter nonsense. Instead of giving them medals lets give them something practical....very large crying towels. Maybe it's no big deal but it gets really tiring to hear the whining and complaining.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The IOC is withholding his bronze medal.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@vg866: Political actions are banned at the Olympics. That's why. He needs to follow the rules like everybody else. How would the Chinese like it if a Japanese athlete held up a poster saying "Senkaku Islands are Japanese!"??? I don't want to see that kind of stupidity at a sportings event unless it's really important. And Dokdo is just not that important to anyone but Koreans.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@Jeff Martin

Are you for real?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@Jeff

So ridiculous.... To revoke a medal because the Japanese complained...

It doesn't say the medal was revoked, merely that he was barred from the award ceremony. And "Japan" didn't complain. That was "Olympic officials".

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The IOC's decision has nothing to do with Japan. It was not Japan that criticized the soccer player and made the decision.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@OssanAmerica

Korean nationalism is over the edge. That they even talk about Japanese Nationalism is a joke.

I have 100x more respect for Korea than any other country in Asian, especially Japan. These people have been trampled on by either Japan or China over the last 200 years, They truly know what the price of freedom is....

After all Japan did, and got off so easily after WW2, why don't they just let it rest. Japan should feel so lucky to be living in a free and prosperous nation, instead of going around protesting every other country in Asia... Give it a rest ok...?

-11 ( +0 / -11 )

At the end of the day this player tried bringing politics into the games which goes against the gamesmanship of the Olympics. He was rightly punished in the same way that Argentinian hockey player was also punished.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

As much as I am disappointed by the act of the Korean player and the general support he is getting from the people of Korea, I am equally impressed by the calm and rational manner seen on the part of the Japanese media and people in approaching the matter. No overreaction whatsoever. I see maturity here.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Barbara Reder Aug. 12, 2012 - 11:03PM JST shame on the korean player. he should be banned from the olympic in 4 yrs time. and pay a heavy fine. for those who thinks his action is great.. well this is olympic and not political game.. well i hope this guy left london and was send back to South korea..

I don't blame the Korean player. From the South Korean perspective, losing Dokdo would be to legitimizing Japanese colonial rule. Japan’s annexation of the islands was among the first in a series of actions that led to the colonization of the Korean peninsula in 1905. For Koreans, the most recent incident created a strong nationalist sentiments and resentment over the war crimes committed by the Japanese during their occupation of the peninsula. This will be a very difficult for the Korean government meet halfway with Japan under current circumstances.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

What the South Korean player did was not what the spirit of the Olympics is all about. Being too lenient on him would give the wrong impression that what he did is not that bad at all. The Olympic stage is not the place to discuss politics.

The women's soccer final between the U.S. and Japan was one example of what the Olympic spirit is all about. Players on both sides playing a hard-fought, but clean game, and shaking each others' hands and hugs after the game was finished, and then accepting the medal you got with a smile on the podium. No political sniping, or malice towards one another at all, even though in history, the U.S. and Japan were brutal enemies in WWII.

And it doesn't have to be because it was South Korea vs. Japan. In archery, when the South Korean archer, Jin Hyek Oh defeated the Japanese archer Furukawa, both of them were very classy and amiable towards each other, shaking hands and sharing pleasantries while accepting their medals on the podium. Both of them clearly understood what it meant to be an Olympian.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The latest news is that the South Korean soccer association has given a formal apology over the incident.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

It seems that Korea will do everything it can to help the guy.

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/sports/2012/08/136_117355.html

Also, how can this one be one of the main news on The Korea Times?

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/sports/2012/08/136_117378.html

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Olympic is time SPORTS to show SPORTMANSHIP and only time to be fighting in a nice way and not to boil more political problems. What got into the mind of this guy?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Karen,

His actions are not only tolerated in Korea, he's essentially a hero in the eyes of the majority of the Korean population. It's unfortunate that many of the Korean population cannot grasp the spirit and intent of the Olympics. What's more pathetic is that after the decision handed down by IOC, a group of Korean citizens are petitioning the IOC to strip Japan's medals in gymnastics because their uniforms resembles the rising sun ensign which was used by Impirial Japan Navy during the Pacific War. Bear in mind that IOC had approved the logo prior and that when this was addressed to IOC during this soccer fiasco, they found no violation.

To the Koreans, they only see what they want to see.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

nigelboy

To the Koreans, they only see what they want to see.

You're doing the same thing. Let's face it, if a Japanese player had done the same thing, then he would be a hero in Japan as well.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Thomas,

There is a reason why the Japanese athletes haven't done the same thing.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Thomas Anderson:

You're doing the same thing. Let's face it, if a Japanese player had done the same thing, then he would be a hero in Japan as well.

I believe you're wrong on two accounts - First it is pretty much close to impossible to imagine a Japanese player doing the same thing. Second, it is pretty much close to impossible to imagine such an act considered heroic in Japan.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I believe you're wrong on two accounts - First it is pretty much close to impossible to imagine a Japanese player doing the same thing. Second, it is pretty much close to impossible to imagine such an act considered heroic in Japan.

LOL that is an awesome circular reasoning... It is impossible because it is impossible! Wait, what?

If Ishihara is a hero in Japan for buying the Senkaku islands, then why not?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

If Ishihara is a hero in Japan for buying the Senkaku islands, then why not?

Don't know how you compare a metropolitan government buying land from a Japanese owner through donated funds is comparable to this situation is beyond me.

To get back to your statement, a similar situation occurred when a Japanese Women's Volley Ball team beat the Korean women's volleyball team for the bronze. Did anything remotely close to this incident happen or displayed by Japanese Volleyball player?

As I stated before, there are reasons why Japanese athletes haven't done the same thing.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

alliswellinjapan

As much as I am disappointed by the act of the Korean player and the general support he is getting from the people of Korea, I am equally impressed by the calm and rational manner seen on the part of the Japanese media and people in approaching the matter. No overreaction whatsoever. I see maturity here.

LOL WHAT?? It's ALL OVER THE NEWS! In fact, this is pretty much the only thing that Japan reports. Plus there are articles all over the web about how the Koreans are foolish and how Japan is embarrassing itself by not taking a tougher action. If this happened in the rest of the world, then this news would not get more than 5 seconds of coverage. But this is like the only thing that Japan is reporting these days.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

nigelboy, look at this article:

http://jbpress.ismedia.jp/articles/-/35881

The top comment with the most amount of thumbs up is:

日本政府は韓国に供与している通貨を引き上げる決定をするべき

Does THAT sound "mature" and "rational"? Absolutely NOT! The rest of the comments aren't any better.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

The top comment with the most amount of thumbs up is:

Based on 8 total comments... sigh

What this man was talking about is not extending (which expires in October I believe) the Japan-Korea currency swap in which Noda increased the amount last year whereby Korea can secure USD to protect themselves from volatile KRW which was experiencing a downside. This, if you recall, was the fundamental reason for their 1997 financial crisis.

What do you think Thomas? Should Japan extend the swap despite the recent actions of President Lee and his comments about Emperor's visit?

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Those comments are typical of any other forums. Look at Yahoo, whatever, they're all the same.

http://headlines.yahoo.co.jp/hl?a=20120815-00000315-soccerk-socc

http://headlines.yahoo.co.jp/hl?a=20120815-00000001-jct-ent

http://headlines.yahoo.co.jp/hl?a=20120815-00000021-scn-spo

Look at all those angry, irrational, hateful, nationalist comments...

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

I think that if a Korean player claimed that the Takeshima islands belonged to Japan, then he would become a hero in Japan. So basically, this is all relative.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Thomas Anderson:

LOL WHAT?? It's ALL OVER THE NEWS! In fact, this is pretty much the only thing that Japan reports. Plus there are articles all over the web about how the Koreans are foolish and how Japan is embarrassing itself by not taking a tougher action. If this happened in the rest of the world, then this news would not get more than 5 seconds of coverage. But this is like the only thing that Japan is reporting these days.

I agree this particular news was covered by most of the major media here but believe it to be only natural given its news value, but it is aside my point - My singular point was that Japan seems to have been approaching this matter calmly, maturely and rationally, focusing purely on the act of mixing olymplics and politics, in careful avoidance of any emotional reactions related to the territorial dispute matter itself, which was in stark contrast to the emotional support seemingly expressed by the majority of the media and people of Korea towards the act, which did not necessarily strike me as calm, mature or rational at any level. It is obviously difficult to avoid the build of negative views towards Koreans in general on the part of the Japanese through what has taken place, but at least it appears Japan is trying to be (and keep everyone) cool about this. I fear however the subsequent remarks made by the Korean President (which I find truly unprofessional and somewhat demagogic) is not helping the situation at all.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Thomas Anderson: Here is my reference from a Korean media report on the communication made by the Japanese Football Association which, while referring to the incident as "unfortunate", wishes for the good mutual relations to be maintained and congratulates Korea for their bronze medal. Don't think there would be that many people in Japan who would be infuriated by any "embarrassment" to be caused on the part of Japan by the way the association is addressing this matter. Hope you read Japanese. http://japanese.joins.com/article/554/157554.html?servcode=A00&sectcode=A10

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I hope they ban him for life.

This kind of nationalism can not be accepted in any sport.

Ban him for life!

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Thomas AndersonAug. 15, 2012 - 11:20AM JST You're doing the same thing. Let's face it, if a Japanese player had done the same thing, then he would be a hero in Japan as well.

You have not made a single point with that comment.

First place the Japanese are not fanatical nationalist, they are civilized and show respect for the sport.

The Korean player was out of line and should be barred for life from playing in any soccer event outside of Korea.

Lastly, Japanese players would never, never act as childish as their Korean counterparts.

You have no point and your comments show your lack of logical reason.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

alliswellinjapan

I agree this particular news was covered by most of the major media here but believe it to be only natural given its news value, but it is aside my point

If this happened in any other parts of the world, then it would not get more than 5 seconds of coverage. Yet Japan acts like as if this is the most important and interesting news there is.

JoeBigs

First place the Japanese are not fanatical nationalist, they are civilized and show respect for the sport.

AHAHAHAHAHAH. Sure, most Japanese are NOT nationalists. LOL. They are, buddy, so stop hiding it.

I remember how on the Internet, the Japanese kept badmouthing the Korean ice skater Kim Yu-Na to "fall". Yes, so very mature, civilized, etc. NOT.

Lastly, Japanese players would never, never act as childish as their Korean counterparts.

Can't argue with this unassailable Japan Logic (tm).

You have no point and your comments show your lack of logical reason.

Your comment above is "logical reason"? LOL.

-8 ( +2 / -10 )

Generalize much, Mr. Anderson?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I remember how on the Internet, the Japanese kept badmouthing the Korean ice skater Kim Yu-Na to "fall".

Correction: "SOME Japanese kept badmouthing ..."

All of my Japanese friends I know actually admire Kim Yu-Na and kept calling her "kakoii" for her 007 routine. Don't go putting all people in one group because of the bad practices of a few. Although you may have a point that most older Japanese people are nationalists. At least the younger Japanese that I know (below 40 years of age) are not and hate right wingers and their lot. I'm sure the same can be said of most Koreans. What this soccer player did was in poor taste, but I'm sure that it doesn't reflect most Koreans, as what a few Japanese do doesn't reflect the population as a whole.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Is there something valuable on those islands?????

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

This is all politics at it's worst. It is hardly a coincidence that all of the participants are facing elections or change of leaders, as in China in the coming months and the participants are bent on parading their devotion to these historic claims. Korea’s is scheduled for later this year, when Lee must step down. He is not allowed to run for a second term, but undoubtedly wants to make things easier for his party. Japan’s election has not been set but is expected to occur later this year. About the same time, the Congress of the Chinese Communist party meet to pick the next generation of leaders. Islets, no matter how small, will remain in stormy seas.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

From the comments above it appears that Thomas believes comments on boards to be somehow representative of national opinions. I have read plenty of yahoo articles and scrolled through a few of the comments as well. Do I take these as being representative of American opinion at large. No I do not. One of the reasons being that politically motivated extremists are constantly stoking those boards with their opinions.

I personally think it highly unlikely that any Japanese athlete would do something like what happened. I also think that if one did, they would be a hero to a minority and nothing more than a hot discussion point for those who are interested in such topics. Many are not interested at all. The same goes for interested in olympics. I have plenty of sporting friends who hardly watched the olympics at all because they didn't want to miss practice. That's Japan.

I would concede that the Japanese are indeed nationalistic at heart. However, for the most part they value restraint in the way that sentiment is publicly expressed. Ishihara, for example, is not a national hero at all. Amongst those few people interested in politics, there are very mixed opinions about him, Hashimoto and the rest.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

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