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Remove your tattoos, Beijing tells Chinese soccer players

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What a joke the Communists are. In which century are they living in? Tattoos are popular among the young, deal with it. How do they negatively affect ones soccer play? Look at most of the top soccer players in Europe. They have tattoos. Guys like Beckham have been covered in them for decades.

Whats next? Target those with unacceptable haircuts or teeth that are too white?

13 ( +16 / -3 )

The next step is to tell them they have a choice of four approved hair cuts they must get one of.

Personal freedom now gets the death knell in China. Groups of old men now making all the calls and how you look, what you can and cant wear and they style your hair must be so you do not look effeminate.

Ridiculous a sporting body telling grown men they cant get a tattoo. Tell them where to go.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

zichiToday  01:50 pm JST

And the foreign players?

A hunch tells me the players in the Chinese national team might be Chinese.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Chinese are surely among the most tattooed people. Going from Japan to China, it's quite a shock. Hot chics working in upscale fashion shops, waiters in somewhat expensive restaurants and etc have tattoos on their necks, behind ears and etc.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

A hunch tells me the players in the Chinese national team might be Chinese.

Not necessarily true al all.

As you likely know, quite a few Brazilian nationals play for the Chinese national team. It is highly unlikely they are Chinese citizens, more likely qualified under the residential rule.

So Zichis question is valid.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

As you likely know, quite a few Brazilian nationals play for the Chinese national team. It is highly unlikely they are Chinese citizens, more likely qualified under the residential rule.

It appears that they have been naturalized as Chinese citizens, so the rules probably affect them too, they are "Chinese".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Chinese_naturalized_footballers

4 ( +5 / -1 )

China - still living in the 50s.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Bet players would be allowed to have a tattoo of Xi on them!

8 ( +8 / -0 )

what is wrong with tattoos? even here in Japan tattoos are frown upon...

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Every day, Chinese government becomes more toxic for humanity.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

Xi's obsession with total control will be his undoing.

He wants a N.Korea type dictatorship and will end up with a N.Korea type economy too!

11 ( +11 / -0 )

Xi will ultimately destroy the ccp. People just don't like being told what to do and he doesn't know where to draw the line.

Communism rots from the inside, and Xi has the dial turned up to 11.

The west just needs to sit back, wait and watch it all fall apart over the next 20 years.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

The west just needs to sit back, wait and watch it all fall apart over the next 20 years.

The free world should not be passive. They should be boycotting ALL trade with China and cease all diplomatic relations. Starve them of resources and foreign money.

Diplomatic relations should be shifted to the great nation of Taiwan.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

The next step is to tell them they have a choice of four approved hair cuts they must get one of.

Sounds like a Japanese salaryman: A, B or C cut, sir?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Maybe it’s a good thing. Tats used to be trendy and it was a brave thing to do to celebrate your life experience. Now, it’s just not cool. Most of my friends want them removed.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Fighto!Today  02:54 pm JST

A hunch tells me the players in the Chinese national team might be Chinese.

Not necessarily true al all.

As you likely know, quite a few Brazilian nationals play for the Chinese national team. It is highly unlikely they are Chinese citizens, more likely qualified under the residential rule.

So Zichis question is valid.

Nope, you have to be a citizen of the nation you play for regardless of where you were born.

If China decides to apply the rule to all league players it will just stop most foreign talent going there and with the way China is heading it wouldn't surprise me.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

China will at some point in the future begin to splicing DNA to produce a superior physical Han population. Han resistant to disease, injuries and aging; and that means people who are naturally physically and mentally gifted. They are already gathering DNA samples from places all over Africa. Sub-Saharan being the birthplace of the human race is the only place where pure humans still live. Most Sub-Saharan Africans are only human. All other populations outside of Sub-Saharan Africa from Europe, Asia and the Americas have human DNA mixed with Neanderthal DNA.

The Chinese Genetic Experiments That Shocked The World

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MXDpCVxksh8

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

China is going through all the Western is cool phase. Lots of trends not common in China are cool. I had friend living in China who got paid to be a foreign friend to make Chinese people appear cool and worldly to others. The "agency" who worked for also rented out foreigners to act as doctors and other professionals for formal events like dinner parties and ceremonies. The hosts wanted to seem "reputable".

The CCP wants to exploit the West, but they do not want the Western values to erode the CCP's hold on power. in country with such a large population.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I have to like women with tattoos. I guess if I lived in China and dated such a woman I'd be tossed in jail or sent to a re-education camp. So, I'm glad I live in Canada, where such body decoration isn't frowned upon by most people.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

This is definitely a step down for their overall soccer program. Some players being passed over because of image/grooming incompatibilities will limit skill development and could push Chinese players to play abroad and stay abroad.

Someone else already mentioned the ramifications of applying this rule to foreign players and how it would discourage a lot of top talent from entering, which also hurts China’s soft power moves because of the rejection of culture.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Let’s not forget @TrevorPeace 7:04pm like China with the Uyghur “campuses & dormitoiries”, Canada did frown upon many aspects of Indigenous culture, including facial tattoos.

From the early 1900s to the 1970s, the Canada government forcibly removed Indigenous children from their families & communities and placed them in the government-sponsored ‘residential school system’. Some curriculum aimed to convert indigenous children to Christianity but all schools forced children to assimilate to a Euro-American way of life and erase their previous traditions and culture. Many of these children suffered mental, physical, and sexual abuse with some dying during the process.

The experience was deeply traumatizing for these Indigenous cultures. The loss of many Indigenous languages, ways of life, and cultural identity have had repercussions in Indigenous communities to this day. The art of tattooing was one of the era’s casualties, and the practice largely disappeared in northern cultures during the early 20th century.

*- @TrevorPeace 7:04pm: “I have to like women with tattoos. I guess if I lived in China and dated such a woman I'd be tossed in jail or sent to a re-education camp. *So, I'm glad I live in Canada, where such body decoration isn't frowned upon by most people.” -

1 ( +2 / -1 )

It's like old Japan and even Japan is coming around slowly, I went to this Onsen and the sign says "NO tattoos" and yet, there were 3 young guys that had them, which cracked me up. You are definitely seeing more and more people in this country wearing tatts and it has become so prevalent that a few establishments (including Onsens) are loosening up on their No tattoo rules. I don't have tatts, never liked them or found them attractive, but each to his own, if people want them, let them have it. 

China is now going through that same phase, but this might be a bit more different, I think the Communists will forcefully push these people to remove their ink if they truly want and I can see that definitely happening.

Someone else already mentioned the ramifications of applying this rule to foreign players and how it would discourage a lot of top talent from entering, which also hurts China’s soft power moves because of the rejection of culture.

Exactly.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Tattoos. A fading trend. A diminishing 'cool' factor. A trend borrowed from prison. Some of that ink a surface reveal of certain pathologies.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

No ink on the members of World Cup Champions, Nadeshiko. Nor any call to 'express' one's individuality thru pattered ink on one's epidermal layer. Tats associated with creepy, sociopath yakuza.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Tattoo removal is painful and leaves scarring. It would be much easier to just require the players to cover up the tattoos (running in spandex and sleeves) like the Iranian national team does (though they cover up for a different reason, of course). Then, when the player is no longer on the national team, he can display his tats based on his own personal desires.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Tattoos. A fading trend. A diminishing 'cool' factor.

(Translation: Richard is too scared of needles to get a tattoo)

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

*Let’s not forget @TrevorPeace 7:04pm like China with the Uyghur “campuses & dormitoiries”, Canada did frown upon many aspects of Indigenous culture, including facial tattoos. *

From the early 1900s to the 1970s, the Canada government forcibly removed Indigenous children from their families & communities and placed them in the government-sponsored ‘residential school system’. Some curriculum aimed to convert indigenous children to Christianity but all schools forced children to assimilate to a Euro-American way of life and erase their previous traditions and culture. Many of these children suffered mental, physical, and sexual abuse with some dying during the process.

China even copied the re-education camps from the Canadians.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

"In special circumstances, the tattoos must be covered during training and competition, with the consent of the rest of the team."

Same as most of the sento/onsen in Japan, no drama here..

The Anti-China brigade is ending the year in tears, Lol ..

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

For those of you that wish western democracies were a little less tolerant, maybe this will open your eyes. The price of freedoms is the toleration of other peoples.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Every single day the CCP seems more and more drunk on power, almost as if it was just demonstrating how many things it can get away with against the Chinese population, controlling unnecessarily every aspect of their lives just to show it can.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Same as most of the sento/onsen in Japan, no drama here..

I've never been denied an onsen due to my tattoos.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Hopefully when the Chinese finally rule the New Global Order, they will extend this ban to all citizens of the planet, and also prohibit other unsightly displays, such as body piercing and colored hair dyes and excess makeup and perfume. And when people of all genders, races, and other current outmoded divisions wear the same uniforms, then we will achieve true equality and March forward in lockstep toward a glorious future of cultural enlightenment!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Rob NadsDec. 30  09:00 pm JST

Tattoos. A fading trend. A diminishing 'cool' factor.

(Translation: Richard is too scared of needles to get a tattoo)

Actually Richard is particularly correct.

In recent years there has been 2 opposing trends going on in the west especially North America.

One is those that thought a Tattoo or extreme piercing, somehow made them more " unique" and individual in expressing themselves, now going through the often painful, expensive, long process of removing tattoos and repairing extreme piercing ( especially the giant earlobe holes).

On the other side are those that have taken tattoos and piercings to the extreme because they no longer "stand out" or are "special" in a sea of tattooed and pierced people. Going to more and more extremes to be noticed.

In my home city there are long waiting lists for "corrective" surgery to remove tattoos and close up extreme body modifications.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Hate to sound like my parents did but not a fan of this whole tattoo craze that seems to have become more and more popular over the past 5-10 years. A small one here or there with personal sentiment like a loved ones name in an inconspicuous place that can easily be covered up is ok to me, my wife actually has a small one but this recent trend of doing your whole arm/leg or neck and just putting anything anywhere just to "express" yourself seems a bit much. I'm not agreeing with the Chinese either, that's too excessive to outright ban, but come on people less is more please, have some class.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

This is why marxism is dangerous.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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