sumo

Sumo champ Hakuho gets Japanese citizenship

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I am rather disappointed that he was forced into taking this route! He is a proud man, and he wanted to hold his Mongolian citizenship in deference to his father who is evidently a well know man in Mongolia as well.

The sumo association's archaic rules about "having to be a Japanese citizen" to become a "oya-katta" and run his own stable would have been seriously challenged as they really dont want to let their record holding yokozuna to just up and leave the sport after he eventually retires!

All that aside, congratulations to Hakuho.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

According to justice ministry data, about 1,000 foreign nationals annually have obtained a Japanese passport in recent years.

Obtained Japanese citizenship right? Why play with words, it's not about the passport, it's about the citizenship!

1 ( +4 / -3 )

 Japan does not allow multiple nationalities for adults over 22

Why?

At this point, Japan is like an ancient tribe who believe in a religion.

BTW, I know some foreign people who have more than one nationality.

Is it not OK for only celebrities or what?

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Hakuho found a suitable middle ground. He honored his national hero father until the man passed away, then got the citizenship to prepare for his future coaching career. Much more dignified for a yokozuna than opening a nabe restaurant.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Two points:

Japanese law allows non- citizens to work only in non-supervisory positions in government. For example, a Japan-born Korean can process your papers at city Hall but can't tell others what to do. That doesn't apply to private companies, so shouldn't to sumo - but considering its close connection to Shinto, I'm not surprised.

Japan has no way to determine dual nationality of those born with it, like my kids, so they look the other way. For those nationalized, a foreign nationality is obvious, and the government demands it's relinquishment. But again, there's no way for them to be sure. My guess is that Hakuho will manage to hold on to both.
2 ( +2 / -0 )

For those nationalized, a foreign nationality is obvious, and the government demands it's relinquishment. But again, there's no way for them to be sure.

I was just talking to a Canadian friend about this on the weekend, as his kid is turning 20 soon. He called Canada, and they told him they will neither confirm nor deny to foreign governments whether a person is Canadian or not. So it seems that a Canadian could safely retain Canadian citizenship, without worry of being exposed by the Canadian authorities at least.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Hakuho found a suitable middle ground. He honored his national hero father until the man passed away, then got the citizenship to prepare for his future coaching career. Much more dignified for a yokozuna than opening a nabe restaurant.

Hey, what's wrong with a nabe restaurant? Being the owner of a business is just a dignified a position than being a "stable" master in a sport that is really having a hard time keeping any popularity, and having a hard time finding wrestlers from within Japan that want to live that "ancient" lifestyle!

There was no "middle-ground" here, he gave in to the sumo association, and his father is more than likely flipping over in his grave because of it. It could not have been an easy decision for him to make, and the sumo association are a bunch of archaic butts for forcing this on him!

I hope the day soon comes that a female becomes Prime Minister here! Can't wait to see the association have apoplexy in telling her she cant get up on the ring because she isn't "pure" enough!

I love sumo, but there really needs to be some changes, like this one about stable masters!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

For those whose country of birth will not allow them to relinquish their citizenship, Japan allows them to swear allegiance to Japan. There are a number of Japanese with overseas citizenship who enter and leave Japan on their Japanese passports, but travel elsewhere on other passports. It's a very grey area.

The Yosha Bunko web site has a comprehensive guide to citizenship and nationality, recommended reading:

http://www.yoshabunko.com/nationality/Nationality_primer.html

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Strangerland: Canada has a phone number? :)

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Strangerland: Canada has a phone number? :)

1-800-CAN-ADA1

2 ( +3 / -1 )

@Yubaru--you are wildly off if you think that after a decade at the top spent not ruffling feathers, Hakuho is going to go looney like Asashoryu, get himself thrown out, and seek revenge by refusing to hire Japanese staff for his bar. But instead of drama, he is staying on track to be an establishment insider.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Much more dignified for a yokozuna than opening a nabe restaurant.

@TorafusuTorasan

There is absolutely nothing wrong or undignified by owning a nabe restaurant. Being a business owner is a tremendous thing. Furthermore, in order to advance in his own sport, he had to give up his nationality. That is a much bigger atrocity.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Sumo culture, sumo rules; Japan culture, Japan rules !!

Sorry, no bonus..

Good for Hakuho..

0 ( +4 / -4 )

There are no problems becoming a Japanese national, and many be or having dual, triple, quad nationality because the Japanese government have never done again about it.

Why on earth would anyone non-Japanese want to become Japanese?

Odd question especially if you actually live in Japan. That's on par with asking why any non Japanese would want to live in Japan.

Donald Keene the American had a long association with Japan. Then retired and became a Japanese citizen, even proclaiming to have given up his American citizenship. Then he died had his funeral here and his grave too is here.

For myself the only additional aspect to becoming Japanese would be having the vote.

As of 2015, a total of almost 581,000 people have become legally Japanese since the fall of the shogunate and the rise of constitutional "westernized" Japan.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Why on earth would anyone non-Japanese want to become Japanese?

Because they love the country, it's people, culture and traditions and would like to be able to vote and help shape the Japan of tomorrow ?

Besides nobody residing in Japan is forced to take on the Japanese nationality as long as you abide to the rules.

Congratulations to Hakuho for becoming a Japanese citizen and I wish him the best of luck.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

But acquiring Japanese citizenship is relatively rare.

According to justice ministry data, about 1,000 foreign nationals annually have obtained a Japanese passport in recent years.

This claim is bogus on two counts.

(1) Applying for a passport is completely separate from acquiring Japanese nationality. You can acquire Japanese citizenship, but you do not have to acquire a Japanese passport.

(2) Acquiring Japanese citizenship is relatively common.

Last year 9,074 people acquired Japanese citizenship. In some recent years the figure has been over 17,000.

http://www.moj.go.jp/content/001180510.pdf

Japan has a relatively high rate of naturalization among large countries that are not immigrant based.

An excellent data source on how to apply can be found here:

https://www.turning-japanese.info/

1 ( +2 / -1 )

In other sports, if selling jumbo dogs, nachos, and plastic cups of beer is just as dignified and satisfying as the jobs of the guys running the teams on the field, then why does anyone go into coaching and managing in the first place?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

i would throw my passport if i could get a Japanese one for sure no matter what nationality i have.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Laguna, “My guess is that Hakuho will manage to hold on to both.”

My guess is that that won’t happen. The procedures he went through to relinquish his Mongolian citizenship and then later, the confirmation from the Mongolian government was done publicly and shown in the media.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

i,m pretty sure most people in Japan when they look at him, it,s pretty much like he was Japanese already. came here at age 15, looks like Japanese, fluent in the language, practiced the most respected sport in Japan, has the record for most wins. this is one of those rare cases in which not only the institution accepts him as a Japanese, i think the country as a whole accepts him as a Japanese. in pretty much every other case, Japan will always look to the foreigner as a foreigner who just changed the papers. that doesn,t bother me at all, as i would never think about getting Japanese citizenship. what bothers me is that people that make that decision (who love and respect the country) aren,t able to have dual citizenship. - since they will only be Japanese, it is unfortunate that their country will never see them as real Japanese.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

If you were Japanese citizenship you would be expected to use a Japanese passport to enter and leave the country. If you were also an American citizen you would be expected to enter and leave the country with the passport. If you are also British the same rules apply on exit and entry.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Well,

Mongolia's Annual Household Income per Capita 1,414.776 USD (2017)

vs

Japan's Annual Household Income per Capita 17,041.727 USD (2017)

Sometimes numbers make the choice easier.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

i would throw my passport if i could get a Japanese one for sure no matter what nationality i have.

well you clearly havent experienced living in many other countries. I could name at least 5 countries where the lifestyle is far better than Japan and the future retirement prospects not as bleak

3 ( +3 / -0 )

@Strangerland As long as you only travel with the Japanese passport, yes

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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