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U.S. soccer players must stand for national anthem

38 Comments

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If these players don't like it, they can leave for other teams. It is disrespectful and tasteless. Leave the US if you cannot at least stand. If they are Americans' then submit your passport and surrender your citizenship just don't let the door hit you on the way out..unless it helps them out the door further...

-6 ( +11 / -17 )

Makes absolute sense.

Look, if you are chosen to represent the national team, this means you accept that you are representing the nation internationally. And, that, if the national anthem is played, you respect it. That comes with the territory.

This is substantially different from someone not standing for the national anthem while playing for a professional team or a team within the country.

6 ( +11 / -5 )

of course, I mean, what right do those peasants have to criticize the royalty.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

Whatever U.S. national player Megan Rapinoe political bellyache, a bit of respect for Flag and Country is not a lot to ask.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Some good players may decline to play for the national team.

They could still keep playing for their clubs though. The USSF can't order the clubs. It's up to the clubs to set their own policies.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Creepy.

The land of the free?

8 ( +14 / -6 )

When Tommie Smith and Josh Carlos gave their black-gloved salutes at the Mexico Olympics, I'm pretty sure they knew they were breaking the rules and it would have consequences. Their protest would have been pretty feeble otherwise. As it was, it had a big impact (on one young boy in Scotland at least).

Not having rules and allowing any kind of behavior during the playing of national anthems would dilute any protest. No one would pay attention.

On the other hand, I'm not sure their is a great difference in terms of respect between kneeling and placing a hand over your heart.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

There is no comparison between Smith, Carlos and the empty-headed children of today. Back in '68, there was actual inequality and there could have been serious repercussions for the act. Today, the mental midgets are nothing more than textbook virtue signallers with no clear understanding of what they are protesting.

Notice Colin Kaepernick has suddenly declared his kneeling over the minute he was released by his team and out of a job. A hypocrite and sell-out.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

"There is no comparison between Smith, Carlos and the empty-headed children of today. Back in '68, there was actual inequality"

Wow. I didn't know inequality had disappeared. When did that happen?

5 ( +9 / -4 )

Sometime after that, Jimizo. Please show me some examples of actual inequality in the United States today.

-8 ( +2 / -10 )

"Sometime after that, Jimizo"

Bit vague, isn't it? Give us a date and we'll work from there.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Jimizo, u want the actual date that inequality stopped being a thing?

In other words, you aren't serious and have no argument.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Ok, Jimizo.

May 4th, 1991. 3:54pm EST.

Now, what are your examples of systematic inequality in the United States?

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

clamenza

How about discriminatory hiring by companies?

and lower wages paid to African-Americans?

and inequality regarding wealth?

and home ownership?

and education?

Need any other examples?

2 ( +6 / -4 )

serendipitous - those are very serious charges if true. Where is your evidence? If it were even remotely true, there would be huge, class action lawsuits all across the land.

But there are none.

Inequality regarding wealth? Are there no wealthy black Americans at all?

None who own houses?

None who are getting educated?

Could it be you have simply blurted out the first few clichéd buzzwords that came to mind?

Where is your evidence that this is even remotely true??

-7 ( +3 / -10 )

Do away with the whole nationalism vocal display before a sporting event. Nationalism has lead to many wars and the less people have to do with it the better. Just look at WW2 and nationalism!

5 ( +7 / -2 )

@Clamenza

Let's get this straight. Are you saying there is no sense in which white people have a privileged position. There is no inequality here?

Also, you said Smith and others had a case in 1968 but people don't now. When would you say the last vestiges of discrimination disappeared and virtue signaling kicked in? Looking at your previous posts, it follows logically that there must have been a point when it became discrimination-free. When would you say this was?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

If these players don't like it, they can leave for other teams. It is disrespectful and tasteless. Leave the US if you cannot at least stand. If they are Americans' then submit your passport and surrender your citizenship just don't let the door hit you on the way out..unless it helps them out the door further...

100% agreed!

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

The United States Soccer Federation has instituted a policy that requires players on a national team to “stand respectfully” during national anthems

"Stand respectfully". This is simply a matter of common courtesy and respect for all of the teams, nations, players, and fans involved.

It's only my opinion, but KEEP PERSONAL POLITICS OUT OF SPORTS.

I don't care if the Rapinoe-types ever play the game again.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

"100% agreed!"

Wow. Freedom of thought certainly has taken a beating.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

This is though because if you are on the side of freedom, you also have to support the right of the private federation to set whatever crazy rules it wants. If their rules required players to spin around in a circle while the anthem is played, or to do the accompanying dance moves which they had invented... then so be it in the name of freedom. However, if something similar is required at a government sponsored event then we would have a serious problem.

Of course, the danger is that some people either don't understand or don't care about the legal nuance here and start calling for these people to be stripped of their citizenship, which would be a gross violation of their constitutional rights.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

It must be hard for the average Japanese to understand the level of hatred for one's country and culture that these privileged brats exhibit. In many ways this is the exact opposite of everything Japanese society stands for.

This is perhaps a good metaphor for a discussion of gun control. Japanese people do not need guns because they live in a culture that from Okinawa to Hokkaido there would not be any place for such a sociopath to escape public disdain. Americans need guns because these sociopaths are pop idols in the minds of people so deluded that they cannot tell the difference between good and evil.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

U.S. soccer players must stand for national anthem

You mean, all that daily pledging allegiance at school doesn't work.

Oh my!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I'm not a big flag waver, but I would expect to stand, quietly, for any game in any country during the opening ceremonies.

It is called being respectful.

Players are free to show their "freedom of speech" elsewhere.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Land of the "free" and home of the brave.

Sitting down and snubbing this policy would be free and brave.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@Jimizo "privileged position" is nothing but another meaningless buzzword from the snowflakes.

in effect, you are claiming there are no white people who are poor or struggling to make ends meet. You are claiming that there is institutionalized racism, a concerted effort by politicians and the law itself, to keep people of colour down.

Where is your proof?

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

Wow. Freedom of thought certainly has taken a beating.

Has nothing to do with Freedom! Rules were put in place to bring about order within our societies. if I get angry and want to kill someone, I can't, I would go to prison, so where are my rights? I'm not allowed to take vigilante justice? Freedom doesn't give you a license to do as you like or yell fire in a crowded room or take a woman against her will.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Actually think that kneeling or not singing the national anthem are 2 polite/subtle ways to express some sort of disagreement respectfully. Imo it says "although I love my country am sure we can all do better at ___'.

I do prefer when athletes stand and/or sing etc but those who don't often have good (personal or not) reasons not to. I personally never sing my national anthem or drape myself in the flag, or have it on display at home. Athletes also have the right to express high/not so high/low levels of patriotism the way they want.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"Has nothing to do with Freedom! Rules were put in place to bring about order within our societies. if I get angry and want to kill someone, I can't, I would go to prison, so where are my rights? I'm not allowed to take vigilante justice? Freedom doesn't give you a license to do as you like or yell fire in a crowded room or take a woman against her will."

It has everything to do with freedom. The freedom to dissent. You have the freedom to ROFL at an opinion you don't agree with and I'm sure that's precious to you - as it should be. Enacting rules which oblige people to follow a particular idea, or at least oblige people to put on a show of respecting an idea, is a violation of freedom of thought.

You do see the difference between this and violating the rights of others in the form of rape or murder?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Talking about soccer, I just read that South Korea will propose a joint-bid for 2030 World Cup along with Japan, China. And North Korea. Seeing is believing.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Standing for the anthem is a globally ritual to show respect for your country and in turn for the event and other competitors.

Of course the me-first/entitled generation don't like it.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

It has everything to do with freedom. The freedom to dissent.

No, it has nothing to do with freedom, it has everything to do with being compliant to a group or organization. If you want to dissent, do it on your own time, No arguments, but in life you have rules, freedom doesn't allow you to blatantly break them whenever you feel like it. I want to have a two hour lunch, but if I insist, certain people I work with wouldn't like it, even if it is my right. Again, if you want to dissent, No problem, just do it on your own time and not when you are in a group setting that can through the group in a disarray.

You have the freedom to ROFL at an opinion you don't agree with and I'm sure that's precious to you - as it should be. Enacting rules which oblige people to follow a particular idea, or at least oblige people to put on a show of respecting an idea, is a violation of freedom of thought.

Yeah, but I'm not with a group bothering people to make a political statement. Please, leave the Apples and kiwi comparison out of this.

You do see the difference between this and violating the rights of others in the form of rape or murder?

For example?

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

America - land of the forced patriotism, home of the twittering president.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I guess if it's the national team, then this sort of makes sense, unless the protest is for something truly egregious. However in that case, it would be more effective to just boycott the national team

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@Bass

You honestly don't see the difference between dissent which doesn't infringe on the rights of others and rape and murder which clearly infringe on the rights of others?

Whose rights are being infringed by someone's decision not to stand for an anthem?

Let's imagine Obama had got his way and changed the Stars and Stripes to the hammer and sickle, changed the star spangled banner to "Onward to glory you Bolshevik Muslim anti-Christs", would you stand and salute as a mark of respect?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

That is the U.S. in general. Some people have a big problem with not showing 'respect' to the flag but no problem with people flying the flag of a group of states that were all about seceding and enslavement and caused a bloody civil war in the process. They also have no problem with certain domestic terror groups because those groups fit into their narrative http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/king-donald-trump-remains-silent-white-men-terrorize-america-article-1.2975405

1 ( +1 / -0 )

At the 1936 Olympic Games some athletes did not salute the host nation's (flag) as they marched into the stadium at the opening ceremony. I do not know whether there were any repercussions. I refused to represent my country in an athletic event in 1994 because they did not take any action against cheats and sanction breakers in previous events. I still took part in the event as an individual, my time would have been good enough to place the team second behind the Russians had I been in the team, instead they were unplaced.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Some of you "show a little respect for the flag and country" need to get over yourselves. Whether standing or kneeling, players are still showing "respect." They aren't turning their backs. They aren't walking off the field. There is nothing wrong with showing respect while protesting at the same time.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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