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‘No contact’ app lets you check in to hospitals and hotels with QR code

4 Comments
By George Lloyd, grape Japan

Under the state of emergency the Japanese government is encouraging people to minimize physical contact as much as possible. Yet lots of buildings, including hospitals and hotels that accept coronavirus patients in self-quarantine, have no choice but to stay open.

Acomo has just introduced a free app that allows visitors to hotels and hospitals to scan a QR code with their smartphone. There’s no need to sign into a visitor’s book, so physical contact with people and objects is kept to a minimum.

Acomo designed its app to improve the efficiency of the tourism industry but it can be used in a wide variety of settings. After all, all kinds of companies are obliged to record the arrival and departure of visitors to their facilities. Doctors’ surgeries record the arrival of patients. Warehouses record the arrival of suppliers. And all kinds of facilities record the time of arrival and departure of their employees, so as to calculate their wages.

Even when the state of emergency comes to an end, it will still be necessary to maintain social distancing for some time, so all kinds of companies will be looking to minimize physical contact between staff and visitors.

Often, a receptionist is given the task of ensuring that visitors sign in and out of a visitor’s book, so a record is kept of the arrival and departure of all visitors. But the coronavirus can be passed from an infected person to paper and pen. With this simple app, receptionists and visitors can rest easy, knowing that social distancing has been preserved and the risk of infection kept to a minimum.

With Acomo’s app, visitors can give personal information, such as their name, address, phone number, email address, and nationality with the touch of a button. Certain establishments might also like to know additional information. For example, hotels like to know where their guests have just come from, how they got there and where they plan to go next.

Acomo’s app is currently available in English and Japanese. Downloading the app is simple. Go to www.checkinherenow.com and register your company information. You will be given a QR code. Print out the QR code and display it in a prominent place with instructions for visitors. Visitors scan the QR code with their smartphones. Log on to the website and you’ll be able to see a record of all the visitors to your facility. You’ll also be notified by email every time a visitor checks in.

Acomo hopes that its app will help to reduce physical contact, and thereby the coronavirus infection rate. Acomo has produced this short YouTube video to explain how its new app works.

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© grape Japan

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

4 Comments
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Check into hospitals with no contact? Yeah, right. Japanese hospitals are still running on paper cards and file folders, fax machines, and hankos. You have to hand in your health card, the individual cards for that clinic or hospital (if you don't have one, you have to pay to register one), plus any number of other cards they may require (no credit cards, though -- must pay cash!).

And, I think we all know how Japanese apps tend to work. Probably doesn't work with Apple phones, and depending on your Android it doesn't work, the fields are all messed up, you have to wait and register by paper first, get a card reader for your cards... getting new cards first, etc.

Sorry, but I don't believe it. Hotels? yes, so long as the hotels have the proper equipment to deal with it.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Over the past year or so, I have had a lot of my time attending three hospitals including operations.

In the beginning of each, I had to register with my various health insurance documents and receive the card for that hospital.

After that, when I attended I just inserted my hospital card into an ATM type of machine which would give me a print out where to go and a number. I would go to the clinc needed and wait for my number to show up.

At the end I would wait in the general reception area and when my number was displayed I would go to the ATM insert my hospital card and it would show what I owed. Decide whether to pay in cash or credit card and then get a print out for my account.

All the hospital also had cash ATM's.

At the final hospital in Kobe, once you insert your hospital card, you then picked up a pager so you could be anywhere in the hospital, like having a coffee, and it would page you when it was your turn.

Never needed to use a hanko at any of them.

Several times I needed to change the time of my appointments so I would call and once they checked with the doctor it was cool.

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My local hospital, upon joining, has a machine that you can use to make appointments (Japanese language only). However, we still have to go to the counter to pay, I think?

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My hospital files went back and forth between the hopitals digitally has did all the scans I had.

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