Members of JAXA retrieve a capsule dropped by Hayabusa2 in Woomera, southern Australia, on Sunday. Photo: JAXA via AP
tech

Japan's capsule with asteroid samples retrieved in Australia

24 Comments
By Mari Yamaguchi

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

©2022 GPlusMedia Inc.

24 Comments
Login to comment

Awesome job,Japan.

Truly inspiring.

I wonder why with such technology available it is easier to get a PCR test in Africa than Tokyo!

8 ( +15 / -7 )

Absolutely remarkable!

Although China send their spacecraft to the moon to get samples.

I believe they will win the moon race and settle their base there.

-11 ( +4 / -15 )

Excellent job, but what is with the plastic bag wrapping? Japan needs to stop with plastic wrapping everything.

4 ( +14 / -10 )

Though not really showy (to many lay audiences), the project is remarkable, highly valued among experts. It's also worth noting that Hayabusa 2, an upgraded one suffered no major accident throughout its interstellar trip. That proves that the project team have rightfully learned from the mishap of the previous Hayabusa mission.

For Hayabusa2, it’s not the end of the mission it started in 2014. It is now heading to a small asteroid called 1998KY26 on a journey slated to take 10 years one way, for possible research including finding ways to prevent meteorites from hitting Earth.

No break? Hardworking....

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

Well done Japan and JAXA! Jaw dropping achievement. 10 years ago people would have laughed if you told them a space mission would land on an asteroid and retrieve samples. Mind blowing!!

Although China send their spacecraft to the moon to get samples.

I believe they will win the moon race and settle their base there.

Sorry, I disagree. Japan is gaining more experience in successful space exploration and I am convinced they will win the world race to the moon before China, and set up a permanent Japanese moon base by 2030.

-2 ( +7 / -9 )

“The Murchison meteorite opened a window on the origin of organics on Earth because these rocks were found to contain simple amino acids as well as abundant water,” Ireland said. “We will examine whether Ryugu is a potential source of organic matter and water on Earth when the solar system was forming, and whether these still remain intact on the asteroid.”

This is great for cerebral knowledge, but what in a practical sense will this do for us here on Earth? Will it improve our lives? How will it help humankind?

6 ( +12 / -6 )

@sandy b, I would have thought that they wrapped X up plastic to stop any cross contamination, the last thing you need outside dust or moisture entering a sensitive area possibly wrecking the whole mission.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

I thought the picture depicted a new take for boil in the bag barbeque.

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency must be proud of such a ground breaking achievement.

Zurbuchen wrote on Twitter: “Together, we’ll gain a better understanding of the origins of our solar system, & the source of water & organic molecules that may have seeded life on Earth.”

Why am I such a cynic?

I am struggling to mentally justify the prioritization for the expenditure to accomplish such an endeavor.

I guess that is a political question for future economists to mull over.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

Awesome...well done to all involved.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

Have no scientists in Japan ever read The Andromeda Strain or seen the movie?

2020 is not the year for this stuff!

3 ( +10 / -7 )

The advancement of science is an achievement for man-kind, not just Japan. Well done, and thank you.

-7 ( +3 / -10 )

That picture is so Japanese, four people carrying something a single teenager could carry.

Keeps people employed I guess.

8 ( +12 / -4 )

Asteroids are full of resources, some are estimated to be worth Hundreds of Trillions.

Helium-3 another important resource can be found on the Moon, very expensive and can be used in Fusion Reactors to generate electricity without pollution, radiation.

More should be invested in JAXA if your serious about space.

Japan could have done a lot more in the past and we didn't, first to rise and become wealthy, yet barely any notice we give to space. We let others do it, discover everything and claim it for themselves. Japan is last at the table, last to get any food,last to get any land, any resources.

They get it for free and we have to pay for it. That's what happens when your last.

-11 ( +1 / -12 )

Although China send their spacecraft to the moon to get samples.

U. S. has already was the first to establish a human presence on the moon . . . the moon base concept, is by the US, NASA, and has also welcomed others . . . . see also, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exploration_of_the_Moon

9 ( +10 / -1 )

I am struggling to mentally justify the prioritization for the expenditure to accomplish such an endeavor.

Barring a national security issue these types of endeavors will rightfully and legitimately be questionable. The technical achievement however is truely amazing.

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

itsonlyrocknroll:

I am struggling to mentally justify the prioritization for the expenditure to accomplish such an endeavor.

I am struggling to understand your struggle, where it seems so obvious.

We humans are where we are precisely due to series of advancement of knowledge and technologies. Knowing what we did not before, doing what we could not do before and going where we've never been - that makes us who we are. We suffer from ignorance and inability. We liberate ourselves by overcoming ignorance and inabilities.

To know origin of life is to better understand our lives today and tomorrow. Sending a probe to a distant asteroid and bring back samples to Australian desert with such precisions is a victory of our science. There are many good reasons why we cerebrate the JAXA achievement.

-7 ( +3 / -10 )

We always take things. Next time we should leave some gummi bears or something. Still, it would be fun to leave a camera to take pictures of where this asteroid goes, and to be picked up when it returns.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

@Sal Affist

How does this achievement effect us down on earth? The miniaturization required of electronic parts used in space vehicles has spilled over into areas that are beneficial to your life in many ways. Many medical procedures have been improved and surgeries made less invasive thanks to this knowledge.

-8 ( +1 / -9 )

Great job, JAXA! Along with the samples NASA recently retrieved from the asteroid Bennu there will be plenty of reseach work and study for space scientists, geologists and others in the years to come. Another advancement for mankind and some real good news for this sucky year 2020.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

I had to have a chuckle at the second photo. They are out in the middle of the flipping desert, but still wearing face masks. :D

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Yep. If there is anywhere I would anti-mask it would be in the Aussie desert. It's brutal out there, Corona has no chance.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

FrankToday  06:36 am JST

Yep. If there is anywhere I would anti-mask it would be in the Aussie desert. It's brutal out there, Corona has no chance.

Oh yes it does. We can't see it.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites